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HALL 



NAOMI EMMA SPACEMAN HALL 

AND 
THEIR POSTERITY 



0086044 




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Date. 



'cnrmO230 6 79 1 



13C 1-41 d Printed in USA 






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JOHN HALL AND NAOMI EMMA SPACKMAN HALL 



AND 



THEIR POSTERITY 



DATE MICROFILMED 



ITEM #. 

PROJECT and 
ROLL # 



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CALL tt 






GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF 
LATTER-DAY SAINTS 



DEDICATED 
TO 
THE POSTERITY OF JOHN HALL AND NAOMI EMMA Sl'ACKMAN HALL 



I would like to take this opportunity to express my appreciation to all of 
you for your cooperation in compiling this Hall History. It has been a 
"labor of love", which has given me the opportunity to know and appreciate 
our Hall relatives, and hopefully it will bring us all closer together as 
a family. 

I sincerely hope you will forgive any mistakes I have made, and I want 
you to know that even though it is not perfect, it contains lots of love 
and appreciation for our grandparents and the sacrifice they made to leave 
their home in England to come to America for the Church of Jesus Christ of 
Latter-day Saints. 

May this year of 19S3 and the years ahead bring continued health and 
happiness to all of you, and may the Lord's blessings be with you always. 

Sincerely, 




>4^£ Si^fc 









x- 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Chapter I John Hall and Naomi Emma Spackman 5 

Chapter II John Spackman Hall and His Posterity 17 

Chapter III Edward Spackman Hall and His Posterity 57 

Chapter IV Emma Spackman Hall and Her Posterity 123 

Chapter V Alma Spackman Hall and His Posterity 154 

Chapter VI Louisa Spackman Hall and Her Posterity 166 

Chapter VII Ella Spackman Hall and Her Posterity 191 

Chapter VIII Josephine Spackman Hall 213 

Chapter IX Oscar Spackman Hall and His Posterity 216 

Chapter X Florence Spackman Hall and Her Posterity 233 

Chapter XI Henry George Spackman Hall and His Posterity 252 

Chapter XII Mable Spackman Hall and Her Posterity 287 

Chapter XIII Genealogy and Maps 292 

Chapter XIV Miscellaneous Pictures 309 



3- 



TILE DESCENDANTS 

OF 

JOI1N HALL AND NAOMI EMMA S PACKMAN 



Children 12 

Grandchildren 41 

Great grandchildren 120 

Great, great grandchildren 213 

Great, great, great grandchildren 25 

Total 411 



*h 





CHAPTER I 



JOHN HALL AND NAOMI EMMA SPACKMAN HALL 



Children 

John Spackraan Hall 
Edward Spackman Hall 
Stillborn Son 
Emma Spackman Hall 
Alma Spackman Hall 
Louisa Spackman Hall 
Ella Spackman Hall 
Josephine Spackman Hall 
Oscar Spackman Hall 
Florence Spackman Hall 
Henry George Spackman Hall 
Mable Spackman Hall 



-->>' 



JOHN HALL AND NAOMI EMMA SPACKMAN 

Grandfather John Hall was born during the winter of 1849, on February 21, 
in ChaHock, Kent, England. He was the second of nine children born to 
George and Charlotte Back Hall. We know very little about his youth, 
except the fact that he listened to the missionaries of the Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter-day Saints and was the first of his family to join the 
Church. He was baptized on April 13, 1870, when he was 21 years old. 

Three years later he left Liverpool, England, on the Steamer SS Nevada 
and arrived in the Port of New York, June 16, 1873. We assume that he 
was with other converts to the Church, because on the same passenger list 
was the name of Henry Spackman, who was his future wife's father. .Ve have 
been told that one of his brothers also came with him. The group arrived 
in Salt Lake City on June 26, 1873, having traveled across the continent 
by train. (The railroad was completed to Utah on May 10, 1869.) 

Grandmother Hall, Naomi Emma Spackman, was the 6th child in a family of 
9 children. Her twin brother, William, died the day after birth. She was 
born in Burbage, Wiltshire, England, on October 8, 1856, and was baptized 
on October 8, 1864, when she was 8 years old. Her parents were already 
members of the Church. Her father, Henry Spackman, had been baptized on 
April 21, 1850, and her mother, Ann Hibbard, was baptized on April 29, 1850. 

Grandmother came from England in October of 1873, when she was 17 years old. 
Evidently her father came a few months earlier to find a place for the 
family when they arrived in October. After she arrived she worked in the 
Erdley family home as a maid, and Grandfather worked in the Erdley grocery 
store. According to records of Aunt Ella, Grandfather also worked for 
President Brigham Young, while he was living in the Forest Dale Ward. 



John and Emma 




Less than a year after arriving in Salt Lake City, Grandfather received 
his endowments, March 2, 1874, in the Endowment house (while the Salt Lake 
Temple was being constructed). He was ordained a Seventy on October 12, 
1876, and was ordained a High Priest on February 4, 1906. He and Emma 
Spackman were married and sealed together for Time and Eternity in the 
Endowment house on March 6, 1879, by Daniel H. Wells. He was 30 years 
old and she was 23 years old. The Salt Lake Temple was not dedicated until 
April 6, 1893. 

They were blessed with 12 lovely children — 6 boys and 6 girls: John, 
Edward, Emma, Alma, Louisa, Ella, Josephine, Oscar, Florence, George, and 
Mabel. Their third child, a son, died at birth on February 22, 1883. 
Grandfather had the privilege of baptizing each one of his children. Aunt 
Florence, the only living child of this family, was 88 years old on March 
30 of this year, 1983. 




Back Row: Alma, Ella, George, Florence, Oscar, Emma, Louisa 

Front Row: Mabel , Edward, Grandmother, Grandfather, John, and Josephine 



They first lived in the Sugar House itfard, where the first 3 children were 
born. They raised their family in a home on 21st South and 9th West, near 
the bank of the Jordan River in the old Farmers Ward; the family helped 
build the home. In those days a builder would bring a load of bricks from 
the brick kiln and take back a load of sand that Grandfather and John had 
scraped out of the river. Oscar and Alma would soak the bricks in a large 
tub of water until they stopped bubbling, so they would not take the 
moisture out of the plaster. One day Florence, who was 4 or 5 years old, 
dropped one and broke it. When she cried they told her not to worry, 
since they could use it when they built the chimney. 



There were 5 bedrooms in their home — one downstairs and 4 upstairs. 
In the front yard some of the grandchildren can remember a large mulberry 
bush that drooped very low; 2 walnut trees in the backyard; and a beauti- 
ful California poppy bed by the back door. The grandchildren loved to play 
under the mulberry bush and were often scolded for getting stains on their 
clothes. There was a flowing well with a pump that resounded in the house. 
Uncle Oscar, being a natural born mechanic, often had to repair the pump. 
I'm sure we don't truly appreciate having running water in our homes, as 
well as the many other modern conveniences we take for granted. In 1910 
gas pipes were installed to provide gas lights. 

They had a very happy childhood. Aunt Florence remembers sitting around 
the fireplace on cold winter evenings sewing carpet rags, while their 
father read to them from the Book of Mormon. They would sew the strips 
together and roll them into balls to be taken to a neighbor lady who wove 
them into carpets. She also remembers many pleasant evenings sleigh riding, 
with sleigh bells on the horses, having taffy-pulls and popping corn. She 
said there was lots of fun and love in their home. In fact, she doesn't 
remember her parents ever using cross words. 

One of the boys did some janitor work in a jewelry shop and would bring 
home some of the sweepings, which contained small beads. They would wash 
and dry the beads and thread them on thread their mother had rubbed with 
bees wax to make it strong. The girls then braided them into necklaces 
and felt very "dressed up" when they wore them. 

During the winter Grandfather, Alma and Oscar dug a long trench and lined 
it with straw in which to put their fruit and vegetables. They put in 
apples, pears, celery, cabbage, red beets, potatoes, carrots, etc., and 
covered them with straw and dirt. They then put pipes in as markers, so 
that when they needed the food they knew where to get what they wanted. 
They always had plenty to eat. 

Aunt Florence remembers watching her mother make butter for sale. She 
pressed the butter into a round butter mold with a paddle and then turned 
it out onto a damp cloth. The mold had a spray of wheat on the bottom, 
which showed on the top of the round pound of butter. She said, "Father 
sold fruit and vegetables from the garden, and Mother's butter and eggs 
were sold to the Erdley Store, where he worked when he first came to Utah. 
Mother, with the help of the boys, raised beautiful flowers and gave them 
to the Church members, rte always had flowers in the house in the summer, 
and geraniums blooming in the house in the winter." 

Another incident she recalled: "My father sold three grades of sand to 
the builders. He scraped the sand out of the Jordan River in the spring, 
summer and fall. The boys shoveled the sand on to 6 and 4 foot screens. « 
fine, medium, and large. In those days a big load sold for 25C or 50<;, 
which would be about $15.00 or $20.00 today (1983). One day ray father 
asked a contractor why he didn't finish his building. The man said, 
'Brother Hall, I can't pay for the sand, and I can't get more of a loan.* 
My father took hold of his hand and shook it several times and said, 'Pay 
me when you can. Take as much sand as you need.'" 



Sf- 



As the children grew older they had good times on outings at Bear Lake, 
and they loved to go dancing at Salt Air, the resort on the Salt Lake. 
The Church was the center of many activities — picnics, dances, quilting 
bees, canyon trips, and canoeing down the Jordan River. That river was 
both the swimming pool and the baptismal font. 

Their friends were always welcome in their home. Aunt Florence reman bers 
how much her friends enjoyed the strawberries, currants, and other goodies 
when they visited her, and when she took some back with her vhile she was 
training to be a nurse at St. Mark's Hospital. 

Grandmother, who was very quiet and retiring, was always anxious to have 
the children look neat and clean for Sunday School. Each week she would 
iron the stiff white collars for the older boys. Her sister Sarah, who 
was married to quite a wealthy man, Fred Yeates, sent her children's out- 
grown clothes so that Grandmother could make them over for her children. 
They were always well dressed for school and Church. Aunt Florence said, 
"We were poor, but we were happy." Aunt Ella wrote in a letter several 
years before her death, "Mother was a good housekeeper, and a loving kind 
person, always helping those in need." 

Aunt Florence recalls the following experience. "About 1911 or 1912 Alma 
took Mother and me to Hoytsville to see my sister Emma and family. We 
left to return home in the early afternoon, because Mother wanted us to 
gather elderberries and choke cherries (growing wild in the canyon) to 
make jelly. Lyman said it looked like snow clouds. A blizzard started 
when we were half way through the canyon, and the horses refused to go any 
farther. Alma tried to lead them but without results. Mother told us that 
if we prayed God would help us. I remember Alma led us in a beautiful 
prayer, and when he finished. Mother said, 'There is a light quite a dis- 
tance away. They may loan you a lantern, and the horses may let you lead 
them.' Alma didn't have his overcoat, because it was early fall, so he 
pulled his coat collar up around his neck and ears and ran toward the 
light. The people there gave him a lantern and told him to keep it, be- 
cause they had others, and the lady loaned him a big wool shawl. He was 
gone about an hour, or maybe a little less. When the horses saw the light, 
and when Alma talked gently to them and patted their necks, they followed 
him out of the canyon. We got home safe, and Father took the horses to the 
barn and gave them some oats. Mother made some hot chocolate, and Josie 
cut Alma a big piece of pie. I was cold and exhausted, so I just had some 
cocoa and went to bed." 

The family lived in the old Farmers Ward, which later became part of the 
Cannon Ward, organized on May 31, 1896, at a meeting held in the little 
school house built in 1879 on the George Q. Cannon farm. President Cannon 
donated a piece of property at 1385 South 8th West on which to build the new 
meeting house. Everyone who could helped with the construction. I'm sure 
Grandfather and the older boys did their part. Lewis M. Cannon was the 
first Bishop, and the meetings were held in the school until the new meeting 
house was completed. The new building was just one room, 60 by 30 feet, with 
a stove at either end to heat it. There were long red curtains hanging 



-7- 



by wires to divide the different classes. The older boys helped make the 
bricks for the new building during the summer of 1896. The first meeting 
was held on March 6, 1898, but it was not fully completed until 1900. 

1900 was the year that Edward left on his mission to Tahiti in the Society 
Islands. Another son, Alma, left in 1906 for the same mission, and Grand- 
father left for the Eastern States Mission in 1915 — all from the Cannon 
iVard. Edward returned after a 5 year mission, August 3, 1905, and was set 
apart as Mission President, returning to Tahiti on October 5, after marry- 
ing Sarah Helena Carlson. Their first child, Edward, was born during the 
two years they were in the Islands as Mission Tresident. 




Old school house where first 
meetings were held while new 
meeting house was being built, 



New meeting house 



The Cannon Ward grew rapidly and became part of the Pioneer Stake, which 
was organized on March 24, 1904. Classrooms were added, each equipped 
with its own stove for heat. It was not until November 14, 1915, that a 
large steam boiler was installed. There were no custodians at that time, 
so all the chores were performed by the Deacons. They swept the floors, 
chopped wood for the potbellied stoves, kindled fires, etc. I'm sure the 
Hall boys helped with all of this work. 



to- 



In the history of the Cannon Ward we note that in 1896 there were 181 
members of the ward, and in 1900 there were 331. Everyone knew each other 
and lived as one big happy family. The Kail boys all had their turns to 
pnss the Sacrament, using the large goblets and pitchers (shown below), 
because it was not until June 2, 1912, that the first individual sacrament 
cups were used. 




- §~ ^1— -v 



i_' . . . . . _;»— ..... — * — « . . 



-;-3r»~..J& 



Sacrament set donated by President George ^. Cannon 

From the various programs printed in the Cannon Ward History we also learned 
that Ella S. Mall was assistant secretary of the Sunday School, and Emma S. 
Hall was the teacher of the Second Intermediate Sunday School class. In 
the evening session of the Sunday School Conference, June 7, 1908, Louisa S. 
Hall gave a presentation on "Paul's Conversion and First Missionary Journey", 
in the Theology class. John S. Hall was assistant Treasurer in Sunday School 
in 1899. I'm sure there were many of the other children who held similar 
positions, but these are the only ones recorded in the history. 

It was when their last child, Mabel, was 15 years old that Grandfather re- 
ceived a call to go on a short term mission. He was set apart September 8, 
1915, and returned July 9, 1916, having spent most of his mission in New 
York. While he was gone Grandmother and the children sold produce from 
their garden to keep the family. Grandfather was a very spiritual and 
dedicated man. The children and grandchildren remember his prayers and his 
unusually long blessings on the food, especially when they werevery hungry 
and anxious to start eating. 

In about 1820, after most of the children were married, the family moved 
from the farm to a smaller home in the Highland Park area of Salt Lake City, 
1249 Whitlock Avenue, just east of Highland Drive near 25th South. Orville 
Hall remembers Grandfather sitting outside in the sunshine and he and Alma 
cutting the lawn and taking care of the yard for them. The house is still 
there (1983). 



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Hall reunion — 1919 



3ack Row 



John & Louisa, Hazel & Oscar, Lyman, Florence & Jesse, Heber, Josephine, 
Skog Hall Crittenden Miller Wilde Hall 



Ida, Edward 
Hall Hall 



Middle Row 



George, John, Ella, Emma, Grandfather & Grandmother, i>arah, Zina & Alma 
Hall Hall Wilde Crittenden Hall Hall 



Children 



Virginia, Luella, Pauline 
Wilde Crittenden 



Irene, Emerson & Ella 
Hall Hall 



Front Row 

Helen, Ida & Edith, Gerald & Arlene, Mabel, Orville, Joseph, Edward 
Hall Hall Crittenden Hall Hall Hall Hall 

Josephine, Bernice, Alma, William 
Hall Hall Hall Hall 



■13- 



Grandfather passed away on Decenber S, 1923, after suffering with cancer 
of the esophagus. Grandmother fed him by spoonfuls for several months 
before he died, because he couldn't swallow. He finally just "went to 
sleep". He was buried on December 11 in the Salt Lake City Cemetery. 

Grandmother died in a diabetic coma on January 6, 1936, in Charlotte, North 
Carolina, while she was with her daughter Josephine. She was buried on 
January 12 in the same Salt Lake City Cemetery. 

Our grandparents both had a strong testimony of the truthfulness of the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ, which brought them to Utah. .Ve can all be very 
grateful for their faith and courage to come to a strange land, leaving 
their relatives and friends in England. 

We would love to have known them better, and we wish we had at least asked 
more questions when our own parents were alive. The information we have 
was gleaned from letters and conversations with various relatives. Aunt 
Florence, the last living child of the John Hall family, furnished most of 
the information. We love and appreciate her for all her efforts, and we 
are especially grateful for her remarkable memory. We have finally realized 
how important it is to keep a journal, and hope these recorded experiences 
will help our grandchildren and great grandchildren appreciate their heritage, 



Grandfather in front of 
Highland Park home 



Grandmother 





-/y- 



Grandfather 




Grandmother in 
Lyndhurst, New Jersey 
February, 1933 




-16- 



Oscar, George, Alma, Lyman, John 

Critten den Skog 
Heber, John, Grandpa, Edward, Jesse 
-Vilde Miller 



[ John Hall Called by 
Death; Funeral Will 
Be Held Tuesday 




JOHN HALL. 
John Hall, native of Kent. Eng.. 
and resident of Utah since 1873, 
. today at his home. 12 19 Whit- 
lock avenue, after several months' 
Mr. Hal! was horn Feb. 21, 
1849. and was baptized a member of 
hurch in April, is:::. He is 
survived by his widow and n s«ns 
and dauglu.is as follows: John &., 
Edward S., Alvin s. Oscar b. and 
e s. Hail, -M.s. Lyman Crit- 

H. Wilde, Miss .1- i phine Hall. Mrs. 

j e Miller and Miss Mabel Hall. 

A numbi r <<( them were « ith him at 

the tin..> • : di ath. 
CuBflral services will be held at 
' d l.v, Dec. H at the 

nis_-hlaml' Park ward chape). The 
> " ■" "'<■ ho "'" 

from 10 to 11:30 on the day of the 

funeral. Interment will ' 

cemetery. 



Emma Backman Hall 

Mrs. Emma Baekman Hall, 7!), former 
resident nf Salt Lake Citv. died at her 
home in Charlotte, N. C. Monday eve 

according to word re- 
ceived here Wednes- 
day. 

Born in Burhidge. 
England. Ortober 8. 
ISoti. Mrs. Hall rame 
to Salt Lake City as 
a young cirl. and re- 
sided here until a few 
. years ago, when she 
loved lo Charlotte. 
Surviving are the 
following sons a n d 
daughters: Miss Jo- 
sephine Hall, Char- 
lotte, N. C. ; John 
Kail, Salt Lake City; 
Mrs. Louise Skorf, 
^Salt Lake Citv. Ed- 
ard Hall. Pasadena, 
It,; George Hall, 
[Long Beach, Cal. ; 
iMrs. Florence Miller, 
(Honolulu: Mrs. W. 
jHcbcr Wilde. Coal- 
|villc, and Mrs. Mabel 
JOIsen of New Jersey: 
grandchildren and 
s i ?; great-grand, nil- 
dreu. 

Funeral services will be ronduetcd in the 
Cannon L. D. S. ward chapel Sunday at 
2 p. m. Bishop Tracy Y. Cannon will offi- 
ciate. Friends may 'all at the home of her 
son. .T. s. Hall. .T774 Ninth East street. 
Saturday evening and Sunday prior to the 
services. Burial will he in city cemetery. 




Hall 



lb' 




CHAPTER II 



JOHN SPACKMAN HALL 



Wife 



Ida Eugenia Hartwell 



Children 

John Orville 
Alma Earl 
Edith Evelyn 
Ida Eugenia 
Dorothy Barbara 



17- 



JOHN SPACKMAN HALL 

John Spackman Hall was born December 4, 1879, in Salt Lake City, Utah, 
the first child of John Hall and Naomi Emma Spackman Hall. His parents 
came to .America from Kent, England, in 1873, after joining the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 

■Wien he was a small child, he and his younger brother, Edward, were able 
to communicate with each other in a special "language" that no one else 
could understand. There was always lots of fun and companionship in their 
home as the other brothers and sisters joined the family. 




Edward 
and 
John 



-/#- 



John married Ida Eugenia Hartwell in the Salt Lake Temple and was sealed 
for Time and Eternity on September 20, 1905. Ida was born in Salt Lake 
City, Utah, on April 17, 1883, a daughter of Orville Eugene Hartwell ail 
Eugenia Druce Hartwell. 




Ida 




John worked for Bennett Glass and Paint Company, delivering paint and sup- 
plies by horse and wagon. On July 7, 1906, John Orville Hall was born, at 
Elizabeth Avenue and 6th East. Alma Earl was born October 8, 1909, on Gar- 
field Avenue between 3rd and 4th East, Salt Lake City. 

About 1910 or 1911 my Father and Walter Shepard formed a partnership and 
bought an 80 acre farm in Hoytsville. Father, with the help of my grand- 
father, Orville Hartwell, built a small four room house on his half of 
the land. On February 3, 1912 Edith Evelyn was born. 



19' 



Clearing the land of sarebrush and rocks was long and hard work. He helped 
build a water reservoir but never did receive any water rights. Father 
worked his part of the farm as a dry farm. The share holders of the reser- 
voir did allow him to use enough water for a snail garden next to the stream 
where we obtained our drinking water. 

Father did painting and wall paper hanging to supplement his earnings. 
During the summers he also hauled coal from a small mine close to Coalville. 
It was so soft it formed a lot of soot, but it was better than wood. 

In 1914 Father and his partner, Walter Sheparc, filed on a spring north 
and west of the house and laid a pipe line to Walter Shepard's half of the 
farm, then north down to Father and Mother's house. In the winter of 1914 
and 1915 the pipe line froze from the house back to the spring, so they 
were without running water again. 

On July 22, 1914, Father and Mother received a little gift from heaven, 
Ida Eugenia. In the fall of 1915 they moved Dack to Salt Lake City. They 
stayed with his parents until he could find employment and a house for the 
family. About 1916 or 1917 they moved to a house on 7th South and 9th .Jest. 
Father bought a bicycle to carry his painting and wall paper hanging tools 
to his work. 

They moved to 2nd North and Main Street in the La?ce View Apartments, where 
he was custodian for two years. Then they moved to the Santa Anna Apart- 
ments on 2nd South between 3rd and 4th East. He was also custodian there 
for several years. 

They bought a home at 425 East 21st South, where they continued to raise 
their family, and on July 24, 1923, Dorothy Barbara was born. Grandfather 
John Hall died on December 8, 1923. 

Father was employed by the Gold Medal Dairy for many years. At first he 
had horses and a wagon to deliver milk on his route, but in the later 
years the dairy bought trucks for the deliveries. 

About 1924 Father fixed a box on the running board and between the seats 

of his car for storing tent, clothes and food, and took his family to Seattle 

to visit Mother's sister, Ada Hartwell McCarthy and family. 

About 1925 Father sold the 21st South hone and bought another one on 9th 
East and 3800 South, with 2 acres of ground, where he started to raise 
chickens, geese and pigs. At that time everybody was in the chicken 
business, so there was little profit. Father and Mother invited aunts, 
uncles and cousins for dinner, with home made ice cream and cake, several 
times during the summer. 

On September 15, 1918, John Orville married Helen Bergum and moved to their 
new home at 140 Vidas Avenue, Salt Lake City. Father was struggling hard 
to keep up the payments on the house, and did odd jobs to help supplement 
his income. 



Z0- 




On September 15, 1933, .Edith Evelyn married Hamilton Brydson at his 
mother's home. On November 13, 1934, Ida Eugenia married Frederick 
rfiley Ferguson. On October 7, 1935, their daughter Edith Evelyn Hall 
Brydson died from child birth complications, leaving a husband and a 
son. On January 7, 1936, Father's Mother passed away in Charlotte, North 
Carolina, and was buried in the Salt Lake Cemetery on January 12, 1936. 

In 1939 or 1940 Father and Mother moved to Kent, Washington, to a home 
owned by their son Alma. Father had a little garden and took care of the 
fruit trees there. Father had employment with Pacific Car and Foundry, 
where he worked for several years until he retired. 

In May 1941 Dorothy Barbara Hall graduated from high school with honors, 
and on July 3, 1943, she married Robert Ivan Gill, and later they moved 
to Cordova, Alaska, to make their home. 

Christmas was a snecial occasion during the life of my Father and Mother. 
Although we did not receive many gifts at one time, we always had some- 
thing in our Christmas stockings. We were always a happy family. In 
1955 John Orville and Helen moved to Seattle. It was a joyous time as 
all Father and Mother's living sons and daughters were close. 



Xh 



Orville, Ida, Dorothy, and Alma 




John and Ida's Golden bedding 
1955 




I 



-_2JL- 



About 1960 Father and Mother were ageing to a point where they had to have 
someone take care of them. Their granddaughter Jilenda Ferguson lived with 
their, and took good care of them. John Grville would relieve Elenda one 
night each week. Finally Mother became so weak she was confined to bed 
with cancer. In July 9, 1963, Mother passed on and was buried in tVashing- 
ton Memorial Cemetery in Seattle. Father became worse, and Hlenda could 
no longer tal^e care of him. Alma, Ida, and Orville decided to put him 
in a nursing home, where they could take care of him. On December 17, 
1963, Father passed away in Bellevue, Washington, and was buried next to 
Mother. 



Ida, John, Helen (Orville's wife), George, Helen (George's wife), Alma 




23- 



JOHN ORVILLE HALL 

Wife: Helen Bergun 
Children: Hugh Orville 

John Orville Hall was born July 7, 1906, to John Snackman Hall and Ida 
Eugenia Hartwell, at Sixth South and Elizabeth Street, Salt Lake City, 
Utah. According to pictures, I had white hair. My first recollection 
was waving good-bye to my Father and his partner, Walter Shephard, leaving 
21st South and the railroad tracks (about 3rd West) in a box car with their 
horses, wagons and supplies to go to Hoytsville, Utah, where they had 
bought an 80 acre farm. I remember visiting or living with my grandparents 
(Hartwells), and ray Grandfather trying to teach me to walk quietly in the 
house. He also made me a small wooden wagon along with other wooden toys. 
I remember my Uncle Ross taking Mother to the train early one morning and 
me hanging on the back of his Ford one-seater car, and the fun I had with 
my Aunts. I remember the old fashioned plumbing in their home, especially 
the toilet flush tank, which was located close to the ceiling. I also re- 
member staying in my Aunt Claire's small bedroom on the second floor, with 
a small door out to a balcony over the front porch. 

I started school when I was seven years old. I remember walking to school 
on top of the snow, over the fences and across the fields, and coming 
home by way of the road, following the sleigh tracks. The snow was so deep 
I would be wet to the waist. 

T remember being baptized when eight years old in the Weber river, just 
south of the road that crossed over to the houses in our area west of the 
river. There were many other boys and girls, and we all dressed and un- 
dressed back of the small bushes there in the river channel. I can still 
see the Priests standing out in the river in their white clothes, receiving 
and baptizing each boy and girl. 

I remember my parents visiting some neighbors and coming home in the bright 
moon light, the snow squeaking under their feet. I also remember bringing 
drinking water from a small stream, up the hill and west of the house, in 
a five gallon milk can on my sleigh with a bushel box wired to it. Some 
times the sleigh would tip over, spilling the water, and I would have to 
go back to the stream and refill the milk can. Sometimes when Father came 
home with the horses and big sleigh, he would let me take them up to pick 
up the water. 

The snow would drift around the house, barn and grainery about 6 to 8 feet 
deep. We would dig holes in the snow drifts around the house and play there. 
One winter the neighbor boys came up to our house, and we went up on a 
small hill west of our house and coasted down for about \ mile on our 
sleighs over the top of the fences. One cold winter while my Aunt Louise 
Hartwell was visiting with Mom, she had a seizure and died. I stayed at 
the Winters' home while the folks went to Salt Lake City for the funeral. 
One of the Winter boys and I went up to our house to check to see if every- 
thing was all right. Thefrost was § inch thick on the windows, and a lot 
of Mother's plants were frozen. 



-2.V- 



My Father and Salter Shepard filed a claim on a small spring northwest of 
our home. They ran a water pipe to Shephard's half of the farm and then 
down to our house. It sure was nice to have water in the house, but the 
next winter the pipe froze all along the line. 

One summer my folks and I went to Salt Lake City to visit. We left early 
in the morning by horses and wagon, and I remember how slow we traveled up 
Silver Creek. When we came to Kimball's Junction Dad drove the horses 
through a small stream to water them. I remember as we were going down 
21st South long after dark, we could hear the frogs croaking so loud. 

About 1915 my folks quit the farm life and moved back to Salt Lake City, 
where we stayed with my grandparents, John and Bmma Hall, at 21st South 
near the Jordan River (about 14th West), until my Father got a steady job. 
I remember riding my tricycle on the side walk around my grandparents' 
home, and eating fruit from the trees and bushes. My Aunt Josephine showed 
me how to cool off in the hot summer by putting my hands and wrists in the 
nice cool flowing well water. My Aunt Mabel played with us around the 
Mulberry bush, and we would often get mulberry stains all over us. Some- 
times we would run out on the lawn stirring up all the mosquitoes, causing 
the folks sitting on the porch to go inside. 

Grandfather would put a gunny sack full of rhubarb on the pedal of my bi- 
cycle for me to wheel over to a neighbor on 8th West and 20th South, who 
would take it to market with his produce. I remember taking a horse and 
buggy to meet my Aunt Josephine at the end of the street car line at 13th 
South and 8th West. She hand painted china at Walkers Department Store 
and would bring the china home and put it in a kiln over night. I remember 
Grandmother making butter in a wooden churn, also the big family meals 
served in the dining room, and how we would kneel for family prayers in 
the living room. Some of my uncles would keep a fish line out in the river, 
and when they came home they would go out to check their catch. 

About 1916 my folks moved to 7th South, just east of the Riverside school , 
where I had been attending. I walked from my Grandparents' home on 21st 
South to school each day. My Father was a painter and wall paper hanger. 
He bought a brand new bicycle to take his tools to his work, but he told 
us children not to say a word about it to our Grandparents. 

We moved to 2nd North and Main Street to the Lake View Apartments, where 
my Father was custodian, and I helped clean the hallways and helped fire 
the furnace. We stayed there for a year or two, and then moved to 2nd South 
between 3rd and 4th East to the Santa Anna Apartments, where Dad was also 
custodian for several years, and I again helped clean the hallw<y s. I re- 
member sleeping in a fold-down bed and the two girls in a large closet. 
Next we moved to 425 Bast 21st South, across from Saint Ann Orphanage. I 
went to the Frazier School and the South High, where we attended the school 
dances and other activities. 

I worked for Rue Smith at the corner grocery, delivering groceries on my 
bicycle after school and on Saturdays. Later on, while my Father had em- 



-3-S 



ployment with the Gold Medal Dairy, my brother, sisters and I used to take 
turns going with hin to deliy er milk in the early mornings before school. 

One summer about 1922 or 1923, my Father made a large box to fit on the 
left running board of his car and another box to fit between the front and 
back seats. We made a trip on the John Day Highway through Oregon and up 
to Seattle, where we visited Mother's sister Ada May McCartney on Mercer 
Island. The dew was so thick at Portland that everything was dripping 
wet when we arose in the morning. .Ve had a great visit and went swimming 
off their boat pier, where I think I really learned to swim. 

I started working for the Gold Medal Dairy after graduating from Junior 
High School. There I washed bottles, cleaned up the dairy, took care of 
the horses, greased the wagon wheels and cleaned out the barn. About 
1925 my folks moved to 9th Bast and 3800 South, where Father raised a few 
pigs and chickens. I remember Ida and I killing and cleaning 300 fryers 
for market. i have never liked to eat chicken since. However, I can eat 
it now if it is cooked well. 

I quit the dairy and worked for the Prescription Pharmacy on Main Street 
across from the Post Office. I delivered drugs on a motorcycle and in 
the winter used a sidecar, picking up the big orders from the wholesaler. 
Once I had a special order un "L" Street, and instead of going on a "through" 
street, I thought I would save time and go un "D" street. At 2nd Avenue a 
car was going west and I couldn't stop, so to avoid an accident, I turned 
my motorcycle and slid sideways into the car. I wrenched my knee, which 
took a few weeks to heal. My brother, Ai, took over for me while I was 
off work. 



I remember courting Helen Bergum by 
Motorcycle and my Father's Studebaker 
sedan, which always had flat tires. 
>ve went nicknicking up the canyons 
with her folks. Once we stayed over 
night, and we all slept on the ground 
in a line. I was married to Helen on 
September 15, 1928, at her folks* home 
by Bishop Arthur T. Shurtliff. Our 
marriage was later solemnized in the 
Salt Lake Temnle on March 30, 1944. 

We bought a little 4 room home at 140 
Vidas Avenue, 2600 South State Street. 
I remember coming home late at night in 
the winter and spring, pushing my motor- 
cycle through the mud in the lot back of 
us, as we did not have a driveway. We 
started out with a wood burning range, a 
steel bed, a borrowed kitchen table, 
and 'two unpainted kitchen chairs from 
Sears. 

Orville and Helen 




3,(o- 



I started working for the Franklin Auto Agency on Main Street between 
8th and 9th South. About 1930 they moved to Coveys building on 9th South, 
just west of Main Street. I continued working for then until the Frank- 
lin factory closed down and the Salt Lake Franklin dealership quit busi- 
ness. Then A. M. Seiler took over and made the business a general auto 
repair shop, known as Seiler Motor Company. During the depression while 
work was slow, Mr. Seiler bought some wood and I nade 2 tool cabinets, 
one for him and one for me. Later he went on a mission for the L.D. S. 
Church, so I ran the shop for him until 1954, when we moved to Seattle. 

After I started working for the Auto Company, I became active in the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and was ordained an .Eider, 
and after awhile was made an Elders' Quorum i resident. .Vith the help of 
my counselors we activated many other Elders and had many socials and fun 
times. After a year or so, I was set apart as a Seventy and served on a 
Stake Mission, as one of the 7 Presidents of the Seventies .;uorum. 

vVhile all this was going on Helen and I had a son, Hugh Orville Hall, 
born January 25, 1931. 



Helen, Orville, and Hugh 





-JL7- 



Over the years we furnished our little hone, built a garage, dug the dirt 
out from under the house, put in a cement wall all around under the house, 
and finally made an apartment in the basement. One day while putting in a 
section of the basement wall the forms collapsed, pouring cement all over. 
VilfordTolman was helping me, so we hurried and moved the cement away, put 
the forms back in place and shoveled the cement back in the forms. 

From 1950 to 1953 Helen and I went with Donna and Wilford Tolnan south to 
the canyon lands each year on the 30th of May to spend our 3-day week ends. 
We had a lot of fun, but they were hard trips, and the ladies said, "I'o more.' 

Hugh married a lovely girl from across the street, Beverly Thomson. They 
were married in the L.D. S. Temple and lived in our basement apartment. 
They had 2 lovely children, Ronald and Christine. Later in Ogden they had 
two more children, Bruce and Tamara. wle's had a lot of fun with them while 
they were growing up. Ronald has become very skilled at leather tooling 
and has made many beautiful gifts for family and friends. 



Ronald, Hugh, 
Beverly, Christine 
Bruce, Tamara 




■2.S- 



In 1953 and 1954 work in the Auto Shop slowed down, so I closed the shop 
and went to work in Seattle for my brother, Al , at the Allied Manufactur- 
ing Company making kit Cat Clocks. First I worked on a plastic injection 
machine making cases and other parts for the clocks. Then 1 worked as a 
machinist, helping make metal moulds for parts to be made of plastic. 

In 1963 Allied Manufacturing Company closed their doors, and I went to 
work for Jorgensen Steel Company as a machinist. I worked on a 24 inch 
lathe, turning out snail shafts, gear blanks for Western Gear Company and 
small and large crane hooks, some rough finished and some finished with 
threads and nuts to fit. I ivorked for Jorgensens until I retired in 1971. 
In 1966, while the machinists were on strike, I went out to Pacific Beach 
and installed some playground equipment for our friends, Duey and Gail 
Vhittaker, who operate Whittaker Real Estate Company in i'acific Beach. 

In 1955 Helen and I bought a home at 6920-44th Avenue South, with a white 
picket fence around it and with several trees in the parking strip. Even- 
tually the fence went and then the trees. In the second summer I installed 
a gas floor furnace in the home, as the oil furnace was not adequate, and 
oil was real high in price. A few years later we installed baseboard elec- 
tric heat in each room, which really kept us warm. 

.Ve lived on the Southwest corner lot and installed a 3 foot chain link 
fence on the south side. When we first moved there the street south of 
us was full of blackberry bushes. A few years later the city regraded 
the street so cars could go through, and in 1968 and 1969 the city installed 
a large storm drain system along with curb, gutters, side walks and a new 
paved street. It surely did improve the area. 

Over the years I served on a Stake Mission, and Helen was Relief Society 
Counselor and then President. I was set apart as a High Priest and was 
Quorum President and instructor in the Seattle 10th Ward. I also served 
as Ward Clerk for seven years under 2 Bishops. We had many good friends 
there. Alone with many other members of the 10th and 14th Wards, I helped 
build a new ward house in Skyway, which we shared with the Renton 14th .Vard. 

During the years we lived in Seattle we visited our family in Tempe, Ari- 
zona;' Long Beach, California; and Las Vegas, Nevada; and made a few trips 
to Canada, as well as points of interest in the northwest corner of Wash- 
ington. We went to the spit on the Strait of Juan De Fuca to gather agates 
to polish. One summer when we returned home from our vacation the zucchini 
in our garden were as big as watermelons. 

When I retired from Jorgensen Steel Company the last of July 1971, I en- 
joyed being home all the tine working around the house and in the garden 
keeping the lawn nice. In November 1976 we thought of selling our home 
and moving back to Salt Lake City. I went over to a friend in the Washing- 
ton Mutual Savings to find out the procedure of selling our home. He gave 
me some literature and told me some of the ways to sell. I went home ai d, 
while sitting at the kitchen table reading the literature, a lady knocked 
on the door and wanted to see the house. She then asked if she could bring 
her son that night. The next day she bought the house, and we had our cash. 



■29- 




Orville and Helen 
in Canada 



© 




/ 



The next 2 weeks were hectic 
as we were trying to get 
packed to move. Christine 
Hall, our oldest grand- 
daughter, cane up to visit 
before we moved out. About 
December 1, 1976, Helen aid 
Christine left for Salt Lake 
City in the Toyota, staying 
over night at LeC-rande, Ore- 
gon, and arriving in Salt 
Lake December 2, 1976. 

With the help of the neigh- 
bors and good friends the 
O'Connors and my brother, 
Al, we loaded a large U-Haul 
truck and trailer and left 
from my brother's home in 
Medina, Washington, early 
December 5 for Bountiful, 
Utah. After driving all 
night we arrived at the home 
of my Aunt and Uncle, Clair 
and Ras Miller, 333 West 3100 
South, on December 6th. Al 
helped me unload our furni- 
ture and belongings and then 
he flew back to Seattle. 

We had a very nice Christmas at Beverly and Hugh's home after we were settled. 
They insisted we stay over night so we would be there when the children 
opened their presents Christmas morning, so now it is a tradition for us to 
stay over on Christmas Eve. 

On July, 1977 we bought a 1974 Tioga Motor home with 26,000 miles on it 
for $8300.00. We took a few trips around the western states and really 
enjoyed our motor home. On March 21, 1979, we joined the International 
Good Sam R.V. Club and helped fomthe 25th chapter of Good Sam, called the 
Golden Eagles. We have enjoyed this organization very much. 

On Marth 4, 1979, I was set apart as Secretary of the Bountiful 7th Ward 
High Priest group. During 1982 I went to the Ogden Temple many times with 
my friend Wilford Tolman. 



GROUSE MOUNTAIN CHAIR LIFT 



VANCOUVER, CANADA 



-30 



On July 1, 1982, we left for Canada with 5 couples of our Golden Eagles 
Good Sam group. .Ve visited Helen's sister in Helena for two days, then 
met the group at Holden Dam in -Vontana. On July 3 we left for Calgary, 
Canada, thaiup to Lake Louise where we were to meet our friends the 
O'Connors. >v'e had a very nice trip for six weeks. 

The 1982 Christmas at Beverly and Hugh's was another wonderful season, 
but the 1982 and 1983 winter was very bad with a lot of snow and rain. 
On January 22, 1983, we met my brother, Al, at Death Valley and had a nice 
three week visit with him; then a three day visit in Chula Vista with 
Helen's niece Thelma; and a one week visit with Helen's sister and her 
husband, Maisie and Tony, at Los Osos, California. 

•Ve are hoping to keep well so that we nay continue to enjoy traveling 
with our Good Sam friends. 



FOUR GENERATIONS 
John, Orville, Hugh, Ronald 




31- 



Hugh and Beverly's family at wedding of 
Christine Hall and Eugene Sorensen 





■32.- 



Bruce and Patricia Hall 




Bruce and Patricia's Wedding 




2£ 



Alma, Helen, Crville Hall 

Hall Reunion 

1967 





Ronald and Nancy Hall 
Hugh and Beverly Hall 
Christine and Eugene Sorensen 
Tamara Hall 

Children: Candice Hall 
Jennifer and Melissa Sorensen 

July 4, 1983 



. 3 y- 



ALMA EARL HALL 

Wives: Dorothea Randolf and Alice Sparks Green 

I was born on October S, 1909, on Garfield Avenue, between 3rd and 4th 
East, in Salt Lake City, Utah, to John Spackman Hall and Ida Eugenia 
Hartwell. Soon after, we moved to Hoytsville, Utah, where Mon and Dad 
built a small frane house, a log barn, a grainery, and, of course, an 
"out house", then tried to eak out a living. 




25 



After several lean ye^rs I guess they decided to give it up and move back 
to Salt Lake City. .Ve lived with Dad's folks for awhile, then Dad got jobs 
at several different apartment houses as janitor to supplement his painting 
and paper hanging business. Eventually we moved to 21st South between 4th 
and 5th East and lived there for several years. While there I got my first 
job as delivery boy for Rue Smith grocery store, on 4th East and 21st South, 
working each night after school and all day Saturday for $3.00 a week. 

While living there Dad fixed up an old Chevrolet touring car, and with their 
four kids made a trip up to Seattle to visit Mom's oldest sister, May Mc 
Carthy. Many fond memories! Soon after getting back to Salt Lake City, 
Dad got a job with Gold Medal Dairy, delivering milk on a route. Then Dad 
had a chance to buy 2\ acres of land with a brick house, on 9th East and 
about 38th South, where he was going to try to go into the chicken business. 
He built one coup, about 20 feet by 90 feet, and started raising chickens. 
Everybody and all their brothers and sisters also got into the business, 
so that turned out to be a loss. Dad was still delivering for the dairy. 



About that time I got my second job. Orville was delivering for the Pre- 
scription Pharmacy in Salt Lake City. He was involved in an accident and 
hurt his knee, so he asked me if I would take over and deliver for him. 
Needless to say I jumped at the chance, as I hated every minute of school, 
and besides it gave me a chance to drive Dad's 1923 Studebaker sedan. The 
Pharmacy was open 24 hours a day, and the work consisted of 2 delivery 
shifts. Because one of the other workers didn't come, I worked 2 shifts 
for about a week. I was getting a little tired, so I told Orv if he w?nted 
his job he would have to come and get it 
(for which I have been sorry ever since). 
Anyway, Orv came back and we talked to the 
owner of the Tharmacy, and he gave me the 
job along with Orv. Eventually Orv quit 
and went to work as mechanic for the Frank- 
lin Auto Company. I stayed on for about 2 
years, then quit and went to work in the 
motorcycle shop as "flunky". I think this 
was about March or April of 1930. 

On July 5, 1930, I was on my way home on my 
motorcycle when a fellow in a Model A. 
Ford hit me and crushed my leg between 
his front bumper and the engine of the 
cycle. I have to give Dad credit for 
saving my left leg for me, as several 
doctors who looked at it just wanted to 
cut it off. Dad persisted and finally 
found one that would take the chance of 
trying to save it, as a kind of experi- 
ment. His name was Dr. Sheets, an d he 
did a good job. He put 3 different 
casts on it, but the bone kept sagging 




Alma after leg was injured. 



■2(o- 



out of place, so he decided to let it heal the way it was. Dr. Sheets 
had a chance to go to the Mayo Clinic to study and work, so after my leg 
healed a Dr. Kahn operated on it and straightened the bone and wired it 
together. When he sent me home four or five days later, hesaid I could 
start to put a little weight on it. It felt so good after walking on the 
crooked leg I had before, that I guess I over did it. The bone apparently 
pushed together, and as a result, that leg is about an inch shorter than 
the other, but I don't think it shows when I walk. 



Alma and friend 




3-fcj 



During all this time the 1929 depression 
was in full swing, and everyone seemed to 
be having a hard time. I had been laid up 
for well over a year with no work. Orv 
got me a job where he worked as janitor 
and "grease monkey" for S dollars a week. 
Later on they started the N.R.A. which 
raised me to $12.00 for 40 hours, instead 
of the 48 hours I had been working. This 
lasted several months, but it didn't get 
better for my employers, so they were 
going to cut me back to the $8.00 and 48 
hour week. Orv and most other people 
told me I should hang in there, but big 
shot me, I told them nothing doing, so 
they let me go. 



Naturally there was no work, so when a 
friend told me he could get me a job pick- 
ing up potatoes in Shoshone, Idaho, I bor- 
rowed some money from Orv and put a few 
things in a 26 Buick I had and went to 
Shoshone, Idaho. I found my friend Jim 
Craig, and the next morning he took me 
out and got the job for me. It lasted a whole half day. Then all the 
potatoes were picked up, and I was again unemployed. I stayed with Jim 
for a couple of days hoping to find other work. 

Jim's wife, Marie, finally saved my neck. Her folks had a farm and some 
cattle north of Shoshone. She talked them into giving me a job helping 
out, as they were getting quite elderly, and her Dad was beginning to be 
over worked. He was milking sixteen head ofcows morning and night and 
trying to do the other work necessary on a 40 acre farm. I was thankful 
for the job, even though it was from 5 a.m. till 9 p.m. for 6 days a week 
and the milking on Sundays — $50.00 a month with board and room. I worked 
there the rest of the summer and the winter of 1934 and 1935. 

In the spring he (Mr. George Bancroft) hired a couple of transients to 
help with the spring plowing and other work that had to be done. I think 
they worked there for about 2 weeks, when they decided to move on to Eastern 
Washington and get into fruit thinning and other spring work. Besides, 
they had a friend in Buena, Wail ington, who said there was lots of work to 
be had there. I still had the 26 Buick, and they talked to me about driving 



-3 7- 



them up there if they would pay all the expenses. It looked pretty good 
to me, so they didn't have to twist my arm very hard. i wanted a change 
and had saved nearly all the wages I had earned. Mr. Bancroft tried to 
talk me out of it and offered me much more to stay. Many times I have 
thought back on the situation and felt that I really let him down when he 
needed me badly, and especially since he took me in when I was down and 
out. Anyway, I think it worked out the best for me. 

The three of us went up to Buena and found their friend and wife living 
in a tent. We found a house we could rent and all moved in. We were able 
to find quite a bit of work, but the only thing was it would usually only 
be 2 or 3 days work. Then we would spend most of our money in a day or 
two finding new work, so we really weren't getting ahead. Then the haying 
started coming on, and we worked fairly steady on that. It was really 
heavy work, so when my cousin -Elinor McCarthy wrote and said she thought 
she could get me a job with the company she worked for, I dropped every- 
thing and headed for Seattle. She did get me the job of helping to take 
care of the new cars and get them ready for delivery for the Mills Motor 
Company, a distributor for Seattle and vicinity. I worked up to be in 
charge of that department. 

After working there about 5 years, I was talked into quitting Mills Motors 
and went into and helped start HiVVay Auto Wreckers. I worked there till 
well into the Japanese war and was about to be drafted. I sold out there 
(HiWay Auto Wreckers), and was later turned down by the draft because of 
my leg. Then I went to work for a ship building company in Houghton, 
Washington. I worked there one winter, mostly out on the open decks of a 
half built ship, runninn wires from control panels to large blowers and 
other equipment, as well as lighting and other electrical needs for a 300 
foot ship. 

Later that spring, when working conditions improved and it wasn't too bad 
to be working out in the open, another friend offered me a job working on 
20 millimeter and 3" guns for the services. He was in charge of a large 
electrical company, and his job was to take 20 millimeter and 3" guns into 
the shop to repair any damage, overhaul and replace worn parts and to bring 
some of the older guns up to date with newer equipment, and in general to 
get the guns ready to go back into service. I eventaully got the job of 
making parts on the lathes and mills, and received a lot of machinist 
experience. After the war was over, and I was just about to be la id off 
because of lack of work, and because they were having to convert from war 
time work to anything else they could find, and being a relatively new 
employee, I knew my time was limited. 

Meanwhile back in 1942, on the 19th of February, I married a lovely lady, 
Dorothea Randolf, who was in charge of reweaving company in the University 
district with 2 or 3 other employees. So in 1946, when the Alcan Highway 
to Alaska was being opened to the public, Dorothea and I talked about 
making the trip. She got a month's leave from her job and when I was la id 
off, we got things together — lots of groceries, tires for car and trailer, 
spare parts for the car and a 50 gallon drum of gas that I was told I would 
need — then left home for a wonderful trip. We had many trials and 



■3S- 



Dorothea, Alma and his Dad 




tribulations and many disappointments, 
but lots of fun and pleasures, We were 
gone nearly 7 weeks, and Dorothea almost 
lost her job because of it. Her job was 
really never the same after that trip. 

After getting back I had to look for 
work. I met a friend I had known in 
the gun shop, who was operating a ser- 
vice station at 45th and Corliss in 
Seattle. He made me a good offer to 
go in with him. I did, and 2 weeks 
later he had a chance to buy a tavern 
across the street, so he sold the sta- 
tion to me. I soon found out I wasn't 
cut out to operate a station, so I sold 
out too. 



I soon got a job with Cliff Stone Manu- 
facturing Company, who had invented and 
was making the kit Kat Clock. It had 
the body of a cat with large eyes and 
a tail that moved back and forth. He 
bought the motor that ran it, but made 
everything else. I got the job of 
machining all the necessary parts to 
go into it. The business grew, and I 
became general foreman of the plant. 
He wanted to improve the clock, so he 
put in some large hydraulic presses 
and an injection press to make nylon gears and levers for the clock. .Ve 
didn't have enough work to keep the machines busy, so he went out and got 
outside work to fill up the machine time, We were doing a lot of Boeing 
Aircraft work and had the promise of much more if he put in more machine 
equipment. Cliff Stone made a deal with 2 Jews to finance him for the 
equipment he would need for the Boeing work. All went well for awhile, 
but the Jews weren't getting a big enough return on their money, so they 
wanted out. They talked Cliff into letting them sell their portion to 
another Jew, who was supposed to be checked out and would become a good 
partner. But when the payments on the equipment started coming due, it 
was found that his money belonged to his mother-in-law, and she wouldn't 
part with it. Cliff tried to get refinanced but his creditors overwhelmed 
him, and he had to go into bankruptcy. 

About this time my wife, Dorothea, passed away. Also, just before we 
closed the shop, a fellow by the name of Bill Merritt came in and wanted to 
rent the use of one of our large hydraulic presses to make a part he was 
experimenting with. I liked the idea, so when I became unemployed again I 
approached him about coming in with him. He agreed, so we bought the 2 
hydraulic presses from Cliff Stone and went into business together. We 
are still partners. We rented a building and got our equipment set up and 
were just starting to get going when the building was sold. So we rented 
another building and tore out all our machines and moved into that one. 
•Ve were there about if years when that building was sold out from under us. 
It was a very big loss to us to keep moving, so we looked around for a 



•i?- 



place to buy. We finally found the land and buildings we now occupy, tie 
worked long and hard and finally got the land and building paid off, with 
all our new equipment and a large inventory free and clear. 

On October 1, 1978, we sold the business and the real estate to a Mr. 
.Vhite. All went well for 6 months. Then he quit paying anything he didn't 
have to pay, including us. He ran up bills somewhere between il50,000 and 
S200 t 000, before we could force him into bankruptcy. We got the company 
back on May 6, 1980. It was just a skeleton of what it was when we sold 
it. Hie have been building it back to what it used to be, but he turned 
around and sued us for fraud and interference of his business. We had a 
jury trial and, to our consternation, he won a large settlement from us. 
We immediately appealed the verdict, and we will go back to court with 
lots of amunition to win the appeal on April 1, 1983. So much for that. 

In 1948 Dorothea and I bought a 26 foot Chris Craft boat. We had nearly 
10 years of cruising in and around Puget Sound and the San Juan Islands 
and 3 or 4 trips to Canada. I think that was the happiest time of my life. 
In 1958 J sold the boat, hoping to get a little larger more comfortable 
one, but things didn't work out and Dorothea passed away soon after. I 
bought the boat I have now (a 33 foot Owens built 1951). It is much nicer 
with lots more comfort. 

On February 22, 1963, I married another lady, Alice Sparks Green. She 
didn't care for the boat very much, so it hasn't been so enjoyable as the 
first boat. .Mhen I got sued over the company, Alice was afraid she would 
lose her lovely big home that was all paid for, so she divorced me. So 
now I am free, white, over 21, and as happy as can be expected. 



Alice, Alma, Helen, Ida, Christine, Ronald, Bruce, and Hugh 




-y^- 



EDITH EVELYN HALL BRYDSON 



Husband: Hamilton B. Brydson 
Children: Earl H. Brydson 



Edith Evelyn Hall was born in Hoytsville, Utah, on February 3, 1912, 

the third child of John Spackman Hall and Ida Eugenia Hartwell Hall. The 

family moved to Salt Lake City in 1915, where Edith attended the Whittier 

School, graduated from South High School, and attended the L.D.S. Business 

College. 

She was married 
to Hamilton B. 
Brydson in Salt 
Lake City, Utah, 
on September 15, 
1933. She died 
of childbirth 
complications on 
October 7, 1935. 
A tribute to her 
follows on the 
next page. 



Edith 

and 
Hamilton 




Hi- 



In memory of Edith, 

by Dorothy Hall Kellar (sister) 

The memory of ray sister, Edith Evelyn Hall Erydson, is very precious to 
me. She has always been my ideal to follow and certainly was the favorite 
person in our whole family. 

Edith had an inner beauty and strength. Her nature was rather serious 
and thoughtful, with a kind, pleasant and happy disposition. I do not 
recall ever seeing her angry. She was a quiet peaceful person with much 
understanding and compassion for others, yet had a strong will and much 
determination to succeed in life. 

At night before we went to sleep, I remember her telling me about the Sun, 
Moon and Stars and how they functioned to bring light and nourishment from 
God to all planets, our earth and all the plants and animals, even to us 
and all of humanity. 

I remember the warmth and the sharing at the Christmas Holidays, whei our 
family was together decorating the tree, and then later opening the presents. 
It was a joyous occasion of love and caring that we all enjoyed. 

After Edith and Ham were married, they were sometimes referred to as 
"Ham and Eggs," by the family since Ham was a cook. One week-end Edith 
asked me to stay with her at their apartment in Salt Lake City. It was a 
quiet, comfortable few days of just being together and enjoying each others 
company that I will always treasure. 

Other happy fun-filled experiences that will never be forgotten are when 
a group of us would gather some evenings at Edith and Ham's apartment. 
Usually it was Orve and Helen, Ida and Fred, Al, some of their friends 
and I, who would then go roller skating on theside walks of Salt Lake City. 
Those were exhilarating nights. 

Later I went to stay with Ida and Fred at Ely, Nevada, when their oldest 
daughter, Elenda, was born. A few weeks after my return home, Earl was 
born (about a month after Elenda.) During our first visit with Edith and 
Ham to see their new son, Edith and the baby were lying in bed talking 
with us. As Edith turned to reach for something the baby rolled toward 
her, and I remember saying to her that, "He is afraid you're going to 
leave him." I was only twelve years old then and never dreamed that she 
would actually be leaving us all in a few short days, which left us all 
devastated, especially my Mother. 

We all loved her very much and felt a vacancy within our hearts at her 
passing on to the heavenly realms. However, we were very fortunate to 
have her with us for the few short twenty-three years of her life. 



-¥*.- 



Hamilton and Earl Brydson 




Rites Set Tomorrow 
For Young S. L. Mother 

Funeral services for Edith (Eve- 
lyn Hall Brydson, who died Mon- 
day in a local hdspital, following 
childbirth, win be held tomorrow 
at 2 p.m. In the Eighth ward 
chapel under 
the direction of 
Bishop John 
Fetzer. Friends 
may call at the 
home of the 
husband's par- 
ents, Mr. and 
Mra. M, E. 
■Brydson, 451 
Third East 
street tomor- 
row from -lb 
a.m. until time 
of services. 
Mrs. Brydson 
HL was from in 
-» 1011 u ,_ HoytsvlUe, Feb. 

an^ «.' 2, a ^«* ter of John S. 
and Ma B. Hardweit Hall She 

ZBSJHOg* Ci * * m 

Sii t 8 ??' *** btotherg, Jphn 0>- 
? le n £^ *?* *"*• City/ and 
Alma Ej&atf, Seattle. Tvash and 
two eistefs, Mrs. Id* Bvelyn Per- 

Sl 8 *"^ £ lr J, Nev - «> a Miss Dop- 
«tay Hall, Salt Uk e city. 




-V5- 



IDA EUGENIA HALL FERGUSON 

Husband: Frederick Wiley Ferguson 

Children: Ida Elenda, Frederick Arthur, John Robert, 
Patricia .Ann, Eunhemia 

Ida Eugenia Hall was born on 22 July 1914 in Hoytsville, Utah, the fourth 
child of John Spackman Hall and Ida Eugenia Hartwell Hall. Our family 
moved to Salt Lake City in 1915, and I was baptized on 26 January 1924. 

The first memory I have of my Dad was of him sitting in a chair, with his 
legs blistered from knee to ankle, and my Mother pulling the blisters off 
with a pair of tweezers. How it must have pained! It seemed so awful at 
the time , as I was very small. We were living in the basement apartment 
in the Lakeview Apartments on Capitol Hill in Salt Lake City. Years later 
I learned that Dad had been working for the railroad and got his legs 
burned with steam from an engine. 

•Vhile living in the Lake View Apartments, I was scared to death to go 
through the field of sun flowers that were over my head, because of the 
bumble bees. I had to go, as that was the way to the Lafeyette School, 
where I attended kindergarten. I remember Edith and I playing back of the 
Capitol building and Orve and Al scaring us, trying to make us think there 
were snakes. It was there that Edith and her friend were playing Dr. and 
Nurse and fed me salt water until I was sick. We also used to play in the 
clay bank to the south of the apartment building, making all kinds of things. 

Then the family moved to the house on 21st South just east of 4th East, right 
across from the Kearns St. Ann's Orphanage. Every Saturday we would see the 
small children out working, sometimes washing the windows on the 2nd and 
3rd floors, and I was always afraid they would fall, because they seemed 
so small. Edith and I always had fun in the back yard playing house among 
the fruit trees. There was one pear tree that I loved to climb and sit 
on the limb that formed a natural seat. It was fun imagining all kinds 
of things — we would pretend we were different movie stars. I guess I 
was more of a torn-boy than Edith as 1 did all the climbing, on the chicken 
coop and the garage. 

We used to go to the Wells Ward, where we went to the movies they had every 
Friday nicht. Sone were scary movies like the Green Hornet, and whenever 
one of those scary ones had been shown, Edith and I always got scared by 
Orv and Al as we walked home at night. They w> uld hide behind the hedges 
along the way and jump out at us. We never knew where they were going to 
pop out at us, as they always managed to run ahead of us, and we could 
never see where they were hiding. I remember one Halloween when Orv and 
Al, with some other boys, would pull the trolley off the street car as it 
started up from the end of the line at 21st South and 4th East. The man 
would be so mad at them, but could never catch them. 

Edith and I went to the Whittier School on 3rd East and 17th South, and 
it was there that she accidentally cut my chin. I still have the scar. 
Someone had given her a seam ripper as a present for Christmas at the 



-yy- 



school Christmas party. It was like an old-fashioned straight razor blade 
with a handle on it. As we were walking hone from school, she cane running 
up to show ne, and as she held it close to my face I tried to back away, 
but it accidentally cut my chin. 

It was at that hone on 21st South that Dad bought our first phonograph, 
and it was Edith's and my job to keep it wound up every night so Dad could 
listen to the music when hewent to bed. "0 Sol Mio", "Always", "I'm for- 
ever Blowing Bubbles", and lots of the other old tunes were among his 
favorites. .Ve used to take turns cranking the handle, and hating it, but 
we liked the music, too. 

Edith and I got the scarlet fever and were confined to the front bedroom 
that opened into the living room and to a door that opened out onto the 
front porch. Dad had to live at his Mother's and Dad's place while we 
had it, and he only came to bring milk and groceries that he would leave 
on the front porch. Mom would have to take them around to the back of 
the house to the kitchen. I think Edith and I were a little onery, too, 
as we would pop out on the front porch when we shouldn't. 

I remember the tine Aunt Clair took Edith and I Christmas shopping to 
Sugarhouse. It was so much fun walking in the snow and then coning hone 
with all the packages and decorating the tree. I also renerber when Uncle 
George took Edith and I out to Grandna's and Grandpa's place, at the bend 
of the Jordan River near the Redwood Road, in his Model T Ford. The roa!d 
was covered with snow and ice, and he turned the car around in the middle 
of the road two or three tir.es. I know now he did it on purpose, just to 
hear us scream with fright, as we hugged each other to keep from falling 
out of the car. 

:Vhen I was 12 years old we moved to our place on 9th East and almost 39th 
South. I went to the Lincoln School on 5th East and 39th South. Dad 
raised chickens, rabbits, and pigeons that he sold to the Hotel Utah. 
Dad loved to garden and always had a big garden which I helped to plant, 
harvest, weed and irrigate. It was a lot of hard work. Dad always seemed 
to be working hard. You had to in those days to make a living. Mother 
worked hard, too, keeping the house clean and getting our meals. I was 
with Dad more than I was with Mother. Edith, my older sister, was the 
one that helped Mother. 

Dad was a very kind, gentle, loving man, but he also was very stern with 
us children. When he said something he meant it. It wasn't until we 
moved to the place on 9th East that I really learned to know my Dad very 
well. I went with him on his milk route in the horse and wagon. .Ve would 
leave home around 1 or 2 a.m., go to the barn, way out west on 13th South, 
get the horse ("\ieenie) and wagon and go to the Gold Medal Dairy. Dad would 
load the wagon with the cases of milk, cream, buttermilk and butter, and we 
would run the route. I got so I was good at carrying 2 quart bottles of 
milk in each hand, or a metal bottle carrier that held 6 or 8 one-quart 
bottles in it, in each hand. Dad would take one side of a street and I 
would take the other side, and the horse would meet us at the end of the 



-**■ 



street. Or we wimld go around a block and the horse would always meet us 
where she was supposed to. Dad was too kind, soft hearted and generous 
for his own good, when it cane to bill collecting. He would let some slide 
for a whole month before paying, and sone that were really down and out he 
would pay their bill for them once in a while, but not all the time, We 
would arrive back at the dairy about 11:30 or noon, and Dad would unload, 
reserving 2 bottles of milk for us. 

There was a meat nie company right next door to the dairy, and Dad would 
buy us each a meat pie to eat while we took the wagon and horse back to 
the barn. That would be our lunch. Breakfast would be some hot glazed 
doughnuts and milk that Dad would buy at a bakery on the route. The fellows 
at the dairy called Dad "Johnnie", and would joke with him, and he would 
joke back. 

.Another thing I remember about our home on 9th Hast was the strawberry 
patch on the north side of the house under the peach trees. iVhen they 
were ripe I would pick a large bowl of them as soon as it was light enough 
to see. That was the most peaceful tine of the day. 



Dad like to decorate the living room at Christmas time with red and green 
crepe paper streamers and red bells. Aunt Emna, Dad's sister, would give 
Dad a surprise birthday party on the 4th of December for several years 
after we moved to the 9th East place. Dad was always surprised, and we 
had a lot of fun. There was always home made ice cream and cake. Almost 
every Sunday we had hor.e made ice cream that Mon would make with a cooked 
custard. Orville and Alma would take turns turning the freezer, and I 
would sit on a gunny sack on top of the freezer while they turned it. 

I was about 16 when I saw Fred Ferguson 
for the first time. My girl friend and 
I v/ere standing on her front porch talk- 
ing when this good looking man walked by. 
I thought, "That's the kind of man I want 
to marry." She said Hello and he waved 
back. He was on his way to work at Ben 
Hill's Ice House on 39th South and 7th 
East. A few weeks later I went on a 
date to Lagoon with my boy friend and 
another couple. The other fellow was 
Fred. It wasn't until 4 years later 
that we became acquainted and started 
going together. The reason we were 
married on the 13th of November, 1934, 
instead of the 17th, as planned, was 
because we had to leave on the 14th for 
Ely, Nevada, where Fred had a new job. 



Free', and Ida 
in Ogden, 1934 




V^ 



The following children were born to Ida and Fred Ferguson: 

Ida Elenda born 23 August 1935 in Ely, Nevada; 

Frederick Arthur, born 11 November 1936 in Salt Lake City, Utah; 
John Robert, born 2 February 1940, in Salt Lake City, Utah; 
Patricia Ann, born 29 March 1941, in Salt Lake City, Utah; 
Euphemia, born 24 January 1943 in Herraosa Beach, California. 



Fred Perguson & Elenda 
October 1935 



Fred & Ida 
Elenda, Johnnie, 
Art, Famie, Patsy 





Art, Elenda, Ida, Euphemia 
1971 




-^7- 



Frederick Arthur Ferguson and Virginia Pearl i ierce Ferguson had the 
following children: Vivian Lavern Ferguson, who has 4 children; and 

Virginia (Jenny) Pearl Ferguson, who has 2 children, May 

and Sarah. 

John Robert and Mary Ferguson had one daughter, Dona Ferguson. 

Patricia Ann Ferguson Wills and Bruce Austin Wills have 2 children: 
Janelle Diane Wills, and Jason Brian Wills. 

Euphenia Ferguson and Richard Willaham Campbell had one son, Frederick 
John Campbell. 

Arthur and Juanita Ferguson have a son, Leon. 



Ida, Elenda, Euphemia Ferguson 
Janelle an d Jason iVills 




■</*■ 




Frederick 
Arthur 
Ferguson 



Juanita, Arthur, 

and Leon 

1982 




■HI- 



John 

Robert 

Ferguson 




£uphemia Ferguson 
Richard Campbell 

Frederick John Campbell 



'jSTO- 



Patricia Ann 

Ferguson 

Wills 




Janelle, Patricia, Bruce, 
Jason Wills 
1971 



0086044 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT 

CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF 
LATTER-DAY SAINTS 



Si- 



iilenda Ferguson 



John Hall 
Famie and Bonnie 
1951 




Ida & John Hall (front) 
Jilenda, Ida, & Fred 
Ferguson 



■S2- 



DOROTHY BARBARA HALL KELLAR 

Husbands: Robert Ivan Gill and Kenneth Morton Kellar 
Children: Dorothy Bonnie, Judy Marie, and Sylvia Sue 

The evening of July 24, 1923, I prematurely entered this life at my Aunt 
Gert and Beaulah Hartwell's house in Salt Lake City, Utah, while my Mother 
was visiting for a few hours. 

At age six Mother escorted me to Roosevelt Grade School, where study con- 
tinued until I was transferred at age twelve to Granite Jr. High, and 
later I attended Granite High School. The last half of my senior year, 
in December 1940, my folks, John Spackman and Ida Eugenia Hartwell Hall, 
and I moved to Kent, Washington, into a house my brother Al had bought. 

In May of 1941 my high school graduation took place, and in July I began 
my career as a beautician at Mary Stone's Beauty School. A year later my 
first position began at Audrey's Beauty Salon in Seattle. 



Dorothy - Graduation A special day occured July 3, 1943, 

1941 when I became Mrs. Robert Ivan Gill. 

Our first child, Dorothy Bonnie, was 
born April 18, 1944, in Seattle while 
Bob was lost in a storm at sea during 
the war. He was on an Amy Supply 
boat in Alaska, missing for almost a 
year. Bonnie was three months old 
when the boat was found near the 
Russian coast, and over a year old 
when her Father came home on furlough. 
About nine months after the war Bob 
received his army discharge. 

Later we sold our house in Seattle and 
moved to Renton, Washington, where he 
worked in a sawmill. While living there 
Judy Marie was born in Seattle , April 25, 
1947. We then moved to Aberdeen, Wash- 
ington, where Bob worked in a logging 
camp. Our last daughter, Sylvia Sue, 
was born here on September 8, 1948. In 
1952 we moved to Cordova, Alaska, for 
seventeen years. I establiSied the 
Cordova Beauty Salon and Bob became a 
successful Commercial fisherman and 
still is. 

All three girls finished high school in Cordova. In 1963 Bonnie married 
Phil Davis in Cordova. Phil is a successful survey engineer with his own 
business in Sitka, Alaska, where they now live with their three lovely 
children, Simone, Michael, and Stephane. 




-. . •*■ 



S3- 



After high school Sue went to Peterson's Business College and worked in a 
Seattle bank for some time. Now she and Jon Deering are living in Bllamar, 
Alaska. 

Judy and Mike Cullen are living and working in Las Vegas, Nevada. After 
high school Judy studied at Wenatche College in ..ashington. Then she 
worked as a waitress in Seattle for several years before her marriage in 
Las Vegas. 



Bonnie 

Sue 

Judy 




Lbrothy 
and 
Bonnie 



■S¥' 



Bob and I moved back to Seattle in 1969 and planned to make our home in 
Washington, while he fished in Cordova during the summers. I then trained 
in a Medical College to work in a doctor's office, but instead found work 
at Pathologist's Central Laboratory at Seattle General Hospital in glassware 
and the Bacti Lab, inoculating cultures, and some book keeping, until 1974. 

After five years of mutual separation Bob and I were divorced. Later I 
married Kenneth Morton Cellar. After ken quit work at Seattle University 
in the Cryogenic Physics Lab, we managed the Waldorf Towers Apartments, 
and later the Hmerson and Lowell Apartments. During this time webought a 
house in north Seattle in 1975, which we sold in 1978 and bought a wooded 
acreage in Snohomish, about twenty miles northeast of Seattle. 

Both of us are now retired, but keep busy gardening, enjoying good health 
and happiness with our thoughts on higher spiritual aspirations and 
humanitarian values of life. 



Dorothy 
1980 



ken Kellar 
1972 




£?■ 



Bonnie and Phil Davis 
Simone and Michael 



Judy Cullen 









Simone, Stephanie, 
Michael Davis 

Sue Gill 



-&L- 




CHAPTER III 



EDWARD SPACEMAN HALL 



Wives 



Sarah Helena Carlson 
Leah Ollie Bevel Fletcher 



Children 



Edward Carlson 
Helen Carlson 
.Villi am Carlson 
Joseph Carlson 
Bernice Carlson 
Josephine Carlson 
Irene 



-57- 



EDWARD SPACKMAN HALL 

Edward Spackman Hall was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on July 13, 1881, 
to John Hall and Naoni Emma Spacknan Hall. He was the second child in the 
family of 6 girls and 6 boys, one of whom died at birth. He grew up in 
the hone on the bank of the Jordan River in the Farmers Ward, which later 
became part of the Cannon .Vard. As a young boy I am sure he was full of 
fun and enjoyed all of the many happy experiences mentioned in Grandfather' s 
history. He was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints on his eighth birthday , July 13, 1889. 

At the age of 16 he worked at the Bingham Copper Mine in order to earn 
money for a mission for the Church. He would ride his bike to the depot 
and then take the train to the mine with the other workers. Aunt Florence 
told of this narrow escape. One morning after Edward had gone to w> rk, 
Grandmother said, "We must pray for Eddie. I dreamed there was a train 
wreck and many were killed." Soon they saw him coming down the road 
pushing his bike. He said, "I can't go to work today. I broke my bike." 
They learned later that there had been a train wreck and many had been 
killed. Soon after that their neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. Sharp, came to 
comfort Grandfather and Grandmotler, thinking Edward had been one of the 
casualties. When they saw him, they threw their arms around him and cried 
with joy. Grandmother had such great faith. She said, "God protects us 
if we are worthy. " 

Edward became acquainted with Sarah Helena Carlson, who, because of the 
illness of her father, was living and working in the home of President 
George Q. Cannon and his wife Eliza. Dr. William Cannon, son of George Q. 
Cannon, had amputated her father's leg, and, knowing the needs of her 
family, who lived in .Villard, Utah, invited her to work for his parents. 
She was just 17 years old and worked for o3.00 a week plus room and board. 
She lived there for 6 years and was treated just like one of the family. 

Sarah was born on January 26, 1882, in Goteborg, Sweden, to Axel Alfred 
and Johanna Gustava Mathiasson Carlson. She came to the United States on 
July 1, 1884, after her folks had joined the Church of Jesus Christ of 

Latter-day Saints. They settled first in Richmond, then Ugden, and 
finally .Villard, Utah. 

Edward and Sarah enjoyed a happy courtship and participated in the many 
Church activites until he was called on a mission by iiishop Lewis Cannon. 
He received his Endowments on October 18, 1900, andwas set apart October 
24, 1900. He served his mission for 5 years in Tahiti in the Society 
Islands. 

After his return, August 3, 1905, he and Sarah were married, October 4, 
1905, in the Salt Lake Temple by John R. Winder. Edward was asked to re- 
turn to Tahiti as Mission President, and they were given a farewell party 
by the Cannon .Vard to say goodbye to their friends and relatives. 

On October 5, 1905, the day after they were married, they left on the 
9:30 a.m. train for San Francisco. Edward's father, sister Emma, and 



-£i- 



Edward as a young 
man before his 
Mission 




Sarah as a young 
girl about 

18 years old 



-£?- 






3?G®«r& 



^SS/n/r l&y, '^//„/,, October 24th, 1900, 



Hon J. Lamb Doty, 

United States Consul to Tahiti, 

Papeete. 
Dear Sir:- 

This mill introduce to you Hr. Fdward S. Hall, an 
elder of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, who 
has been appointed by us to minister among the members of the 
church in Tahiti and neic-hborino- jslynds- "Elder Hal? 1s a. 
native of Utah and this is his first visit outside the 
borders of the United States. Any courtesies you can extend 
to Elder Hall will be greatly appreciated by 

Yours very respectfully, 




Hirst Presidency of the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. 



-L0- 



brother Alma went to the train with then. Aunt Florence told of this 
incident. Before they left home the family was gathered together to szy 
goodbye, and Edward was holding his 3 month old sister, Mabel. He joking- 
ly said he was going to take her with him, which made little Florence cry, 
Grandfather had to explain to her that Edward was only trying to ease the 
tension of their leaving, to keep them all from shedding tears. As they 
drove off in the Surry, with Alma driving, they could see Sarah wiping 
away tears as they waved goodbye. 



Sarah 



Edward 




"6/- 



They arrived in San Francisco on October 6th at S p.m., after crossing 
the bay fron Oakland on a ferry boat. During the 10 days they spent there, 
Bdwnrd and the architect who was with then purchased enough building mater- 
ial for a small Meeting House and Mission Home. On October 17, 1905, at 

11 a.m. they boarded the steamship Mariposa and left for Tahiti, spending 

12 happy days crossing the ocean. At daybreak on October 29, they sighted 
the very beautiful island of Tahiti, which, according to Sara's journal, 
appeared as one large mountain covered with green foliage. At 8 a.m. they 
landed at Papeete, where they were greeted by the missionaries and many of 
the natives. 




Picture of Edward 
and Sarah taken in 
San Francisco on 
their way to 
Tahiti. 



-6>Z- 



During the next few months nany of the Elders were called in from the 
surrounding area to assist in the building of the new Meeting Mouse and 
Mission Home. Quoting from a letter written on October 31, 19C6 by Edward 
to Eugene M. Cannon he said, "I have been very busy with my mission wo rk 
and the putting up of these two buildings, and in getting the grounds into 
shape. There has hardly been a day for the past year that I have not worked 
hard from six in the morning until six in the evening, and then do my 
mission work in the evening. We now have our two buildings all finished, 
and they are fine ones and a credit to the town as well as a credit to the 
Mormon people. '.Ve dedicated the meeting house on the 6th of October in 
the evening. The building was racked, and there were large crowds in the 
yard and street. There were about 20< of our people present, mostly from 
the Tuar.otu Islands. Following the dedication we held three days of 
conference, which was well attended and also came off fine." 



Mission Headquarters of the Society Islands 
Papeete, Tahiti - Built 1906 




■% *A 



il'" fl 



Smtfii 

ililllUii 



L>3 



SALT LAKE TEMPLE 




TAHITIAN MISSION. 



CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS. 
PAPEETE, TAHITI. 



September 12, — i9o_£, 

Lions ieure le Gouverneur, 

of French Establishments in Oceania; 

Papeete, 

I.Ionsieur le Gouverneur: - 

Having nearly completed the new church at the 

corner of the rue Brea and the rue Dumont d'llrville, I propose to inaugurate 

this new building on the 6th, of October next by holding there our religious 

services, to be followed by cenferencesbn the two or three succeeding days. 

As we had to obtain permission to celebrate our services in our former 

place of meeting out side of Papeete, I have the honour to requestjthat your 

Administration may be so hind as to .grant us similar permission to officiate 

in our new church for the future, 

I have the honc/r to be, 

Monsieur le Gouverneur; 



Your most obedient sei'vant, 



-fr 



~) 



W- 



Mission President Edward S. Hall and Sarah (seated on right) 

Papeete, Tahiti 




-US- 



On February 6, 1906, there was a terrible hurricane which severely 
damaged the island, destroying many homes and other buildings. A de- 
scription of the disaster is included in the following articles appear- 
ing in the Church News. It also tells of the heroic rescue of the records 
of the United States Consul by President Edward S. Hall and the Elders. 
This was the second tine Edward's life was spared. During the rescue he 
was caught by a huge wave and had to cling to a palm tree while the wave 
completely destroyed the consul's house. 



1906 

Feb. 7, Papeete, Tahiti — As a hurricane lashed 
the island, the family of U.S. Consul William F. Doty 
took refuge in the Tahitian Mission Home. The 
following morning, with part of the town washed away 
and the storm still raging, Pres. Edward S. Hall and 
eight elders from the mission succeeded in saving the 
bulk of the consulate's records from destruction just 
before fierce waves toppled the building. 

A fews days later, in a letter to President Joseph 
F. Smith, Mr. Doty stated, "The elders have produced 
a splendid example of loyalty to the interests of their 
country abroad. I have reported their bravery and 
successful service to the Department of State." 

2— CHURCH • WEEK ENDING FEBRUARY 12, 1977 




The Port of Papeete, Tahiti 
before the hurricane 



-u- 



o 

CD 



o 
u 



o 

U 

o 
> 

n 

to 

i- 

o 
IE 



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On Sunday, August 12, 1906, their first child was born, Edward Carlson 
Hall, bringing nuch happiness and joy not only to then but to the natives, 
who loved the family. The United States Consul, .Mr. .Villian F. Coty, 
draped an American Flag over Sarah's bed when the baby was born, hoping 
he could be considered ar. .\nerican citizen. 



Edward (Eddie) 



Edward on right 




On Sunday, Septenber 23, 1906, Ed's brother Alma arrived in Tahiti to 
start his mission, bringing welcome news from home. It was good to have 
some of their family with them. On April 19, 1907, as Edward, Sarah, and 
the baby were traveling around the island, they were caught between two 
large rivers, about 600 feet apart, by the water rising very suddenly 
during a heavy rain storm. After waiting nearly two hours for the water 
to go down, they were able to cross over to a village where they had to 
stay for two days because of the heavy rains. 

In September, 1907, after completing their mission, they returned to San 
Francisco, where they were shocked to see the great damage caused by the 
earthquake and fire which had destroyed most of the city during the spring 
of 1906. They returned to Salt Lake City on October 5, 1907, and spent 
the winter there among family and friends. They enjoyed singing church 
hymns in the Tahitian language for the family as well as at the Church 
meetings in the Cannon Ward. They brought back a trunk of gifts, coral, 
seed necklaces and pearls, and a big hat for Florence, because, according 
to her, she was called "freckle face". 



i,t- 



Since they had no furniture when they returned iron their Mission, they 
bought everything they needed to set up housekeeping fron the Nebraska 
Furniture Company, 62 Hast 2nd South in Salt Lake City. The total cost 
was $245,00, and they contracted to pay $3.00 each Saturday until it was 
paid in full. The contract is shown below, because it was so unique. 




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■*?- 



In the early spring they bought a snail house and orchard in lleasant 
View, where Helen, William, Joseph (who died after birth, January 9, 
1912), Bernice and Josephine were born. Edward was the basketball coach 
and worked with the young nen of the Ward in the scouting progran also. 
Everyone liked hin — and he was a good husband and father. 




Edward as Basketball Coach 



-70- 



19 20 



Bd, Helen, Bill, Jernice, Josephine, Irene 




1957 Same order as above 



1967 family party 





-II- 



In September, 1915, they sold their home there and moved to ^uincy Avenue 
in Ogden, when Josephine was only 2 weeks old, becoming members of the 
Sixth *v'ard. Their last child, Irene, was born there. 

Later they moved to a farm between Ogden and .Villarc, where Howard nearly 
died during the flu epidemic. Aunt Florence recalls going with Grandmother 
to help Sarah when he was so very near death, with a fever of 106.2. They 
bathed him in cool water every hour and gave him fresh sa^re tea every half 
hour. Grandmother had brought a bag of dried sage and two chickens for 
chicken broth to give him. After he recovered, he told of someone from 
the spirit world coning for him when he was so near death., but he was given 
the choice of remaining or going with them. That was the third time his 
life was scared. 

After moving back to Ogden, Edward was a salesman for a produce company 
and later on a salesman in the W. H. Wright & Sons Store. On March 21, 
1927 Edward and Sarah were divorced, causing much sorrow for their family. 
Later Edward married Leah Ollie Bevel Fletcher in Pasadena, California, 
and Sarah married David A. Robison on June 23, 1928, in Salt Lake City. 

Edward died on March 5, 1953, in Pasadena, California, at the age of 72, 
after having a heart attack. Sarah died on September 23, 1966, in Salt 
Lake City at the age of 84. 

Both Edward and Sarah were good parents and had a very happy home life 
until a very unfortunate situation arose, which caused a break in their 
relationship. We love them both and hope someday in our Eternal Life we 
may all be together again as a family. 



Edward on 50th Birthday 



Sarah - 75 years old 





-7Z- 



Leah and Edward 



Sarah and David 












> 




Sarah 

and 
David 




73- 



EDWARD CARLSON H.M.L 

Wife: Elizabeth (Beth) Bickraore Peterson 
Children: Blaine Edward and Douglas Brent 

Edward Carlson Hall was born August 12, 1906, in rapeete, Tahiti, of 
missionary parents, Edward Spacknan Kail and Sarah Helena Carlson Hall. 
His Father was President of the L.D.S. Mission there for two years, after 
having been a missionary for five years. 

On completion of their mission his parents returned with hin to Salt Lake 
City, where they lived for a time before settling on a farm in Pleasant 
View, I tah. Ed has many happy memories of his life on the farm, where he 
assisted with the farm chores and tended the animals. One of his jobs 
was taking cows to pasture, which gave him free pasture for the family 
cow that he milked night and morning. He also fed the pigs, rabbits, and 
the chickens. When he was just six years old, he had a Shetland pony, 
which was his pride and joy. On one of the holidays (either the 4th or 
24th of July) he entered his pony in a race with the Bishop's horse, 
racing from North Ogden to Pleasant View. Ed won the race, even though 
the nony kept wanting to turn in as they passed their home. He often took 
the pony and buggy on his paper route. One cold winter day the pony slipped 
on the ice, causing Ed to fall and break his foot. 



Vhen Ed was eight years old he 
enjoyed going with his Dad, who 
was scoutmaster, on hikes and 
to play ball, along with the 
various other activities. 



Ed 
playing ball. 



Ed and his Dad on a scout 
hike to Ben Lomond. 








-7Y- 



When £d was nine years old the family moved to Ogden, Utah, where he 
attended Lonn Farr Elementary School. At a very early age it became 
necessary because of the separation of his parents, for hin to help sun- 
port the family, which he did by delivering newspapers for the Examiner 
and by working as a "printer's devil" at the Chimes Press Printing Company. 
At mrht he would sell subscriptions to the newspaper. One year they h?d 
a special drive to get subscriptions just before Christmas. He was able 
to get the most by going to the apartments above the business establish- 
ments on .Washington Avenue. lie remembers going home with the prizes — 
13 or 14 turkeys, loaded on his bicycle. 



Ed's first printing job 




While he was working for Scovilles 
at the Chimes Press, he was asked 
to try selling printing orders. The 
first week he only sold one ^3.50 
order for 500 business cards. Later 
he was more successful, selling 
enough Christmas cares to earn enough 
commission to buy a car. 



Ed and his Dad, 1927 




C his pictures CDdward Jiall, 

lie silent salesman of lie €\)Um6 PtCgg 

of v_ qden. ODds good nature is second 

only to Ins ability to ai ve your calls prompt 

attention, kjust phone 2(1J and lie 

will be on the job 



* 



% 




-7* 



because of his industrious spirit and his willingness to work, he advanced 
rabidly and was sent, by the company, to the Pressman's Home in Tennessee 
to learn the traiie. On the completion of his schooling he took a job as 
head pressman on a morning newspaper in Miami, rlorida. lie would like to 
have stayed on, as the job was interesting and the pay very good, but he 
was obligated to return to the Chines Press in Ugden. On his return he 
worked in both the Ogden and the Los Angeles plants before embarking on a 
selling career, at which he became very successful. 

On June 12, 1930, £d married Elizabeth (Beth) i'eterson in Seattle, Washing- 
ton, where she had been attending school. They returned to Ogden to make 
their hone. Beth war born August 16, 1908, in Paradise, Utah, to Andrew 
Peterson nnd Florinda Bickmore Peterson. 

2d Beth 




During the summer it became evident The Chines Press was in financial 
difficulty, so lid decided to go into business for himself. He convinced 
Mr. William Browning, a veteran printer, to go in with him, and in Sep- 
tember they opened a shop on Tv;enty-fourth Street and called it The Service 
Press. I'.r. Browning set type and made the lay-outs, while Ed sold during 
the day and did the press work at nights. They managed to survive the 
great depression and built up a good business. It soon became evident 
they would have to expand, so they acquired a building on keisel Avenue 
and operated their business from there for several years. 



7<* 



During this period two sons were born: Blaine Edwrd, March 12, 1934, 
and Douglas Brent, May 3, 1938 - both in Ogden, Utah] 



UDuglas 




Blaine 

and 
Pony 



-77- 



Doug 



iid 



Uaine 




Beth 



itoug and Blaine 






-7*- 



Hall Appointed 
Board Member of 
Junior Chamber 




Succeeds W. L. Eccles Who 

Becomes Officer of 

State Group 

Ed. C. Hall, co-owner of the Serv- 
ice Printing company, was appointed 
Tuesday night as a director of the 
Ogden junior chamber of commerce 
to succeed Willard L. Eccles who 
resigned to become vice president of 
the Utah state junior chamber of 
commerce. 

Mr. Hall will be in charge of the 
membership and program division 
of the chamber, formerly handled 
by Mr. Eccles. He has been engaged 
in the printing business in Ogden 
for 17 years and has lived in Ogden 
the greater part of his life. He is 
a member of the senior chamber of 
commerce, Lions, Executives and 
Elks clubs. 

Junior chamber directors elected 
Director Will W. Bowman, of the 
promotion division, as vice president 
of the organization. Mr. Eccles had 
served in this capacity until his res- 
ignation from the board. 

Reports were received that ar- 
rangements for the junior group's 
sponsorship of the Utah Aggie-Uni- 
versity of Idaho intersectional foot- 
ball game in Ogden on Thanksgiving 
day are rapidly taking form. 



ED. C. HALL 



In 1939 an opportunity presented itself for him to buy into a lithographing 
plant in Salt Lake City, so he sold his interest in the Service Lress and 
took over the Craves and Hood Lithographing plant, which had gone into bank- 
ruptcy. He called it The Sun Lithographing and Printing Company. This was 
a very challenging experience as he knew printing, but not lithographing. 
However, with the support of suppliers, who knew something of his ability 
and his integrity, he learned very rapidly and built up a good business 
with a reputation for service and quality. As the business grew, expan- 
sion became necessary, and a new building located at 755 .Vest on Sth South 
was acquired. 

During these years Blaine and Douglas were growing up and worked in the 

plant after school and during summer vacations. They learned much about 
the business and became interested in it. 

The business continued to grow and prosper, and once again it war necessary 
to expand, so a new building located in an industrial park at 2105 West 
2300 South was purchased, and on January 1, 1976, the move was completed. 



79- 



At this tine 2d, feeling confident his sons could nanage the business, 
turned over the management to them, but stayed on in an advisory capacity 
and servicing accounts. lid is happy with the reputation the business has 
for its reliability, its quality and service, and was pleased to have this 
past year received "The Litho-Craf tsman of the Year" award from the Litho 
Craftsmen of Utah Club. 



Ed and the boys enjoy fishing and boating whenever they have the tine. 
Ed and 3eth celebrated their 50th bedding Anniversary in June of I960 by 
touring Eastern Canada and the United States. They have since enjoyed 
traveling to Northwestern United States and Canada and a cruise of the 
Mixican Riviera. 



Elaine, Doug 
Ed 




3laine married Norma .'foods, but w?s later divorced. Their children are 
Janet Elaine Kail and Gregory Hall. He then married Rose Mary Van Dyke, 
and they have the following children: Jackie Shosted and Scott Jansen. 

Douglas married Bonnie Bates and was also divorced. They had one son, 
Michael Hall. He later married Barbara Creel, and they have the following 
children: Carol Bills, Debbie Espinoza, and Tracy Lynn Slay. They also 
have the following grandchildren: April Bills, Spring Bills, Tenya Marie 
Espinoza, Thomas Espinoza, Yvonne Espinoza, and Phillip Slay. 



■%!}■ 



Hd and 3eth on Mexican Cruise 




inflflrTni 







go -/A- 



^eth, Janet 



Id, Greg 




Jnnet 



oreg 




€l- 



Elaine and Janet (4 months old) 




*z- 



Doug and Michael 




\ 



-#_?- 



i.ichael 



Carol 





±>ebbie 



Tracy 





%¥- 



Barbara and Doug Hall 




Bobbi 



Tenya iispinoza 




is- 



c arol Bills 
Sprinr; Bills 
April Bills 




Tom & 


Debbie Hs-iinoza 




H 


^ 


r :.;: .-1 

■■■'1 


■ 
Bul C ' 4n| Bit 





Yvonne Bspinoza 



Tracy and Phillip Hageman 




-<& 



Greg, Blaine, Rose 



Blaine, Rose 




Greg & Janet 



Blaine L Rose 





■U-A 




Jackie & Steve 
Shosted 




Rose 



Scot Jansen 




U-6- 



HELEN CARLSON HALL MARRIOTT 



Husband: Joseph belbert Marriott 
Children: Roger, Jolene, and kay 

I was born July 5, 1908, in Pleasant View, Utah, to Edward Spackman Hall 
and Sarah Helena Carlson. When I was about five years old we moved to 
Ogden, where I went to school at Madison, Central Junior, and Ogden high. 
Later, when ray children were married, 1 graduated from Stevens Henager 
College. 

My Mother was a wonderful person who tried very hard to teach her children 
good nrincinles. We would gather around the piano while she taught us to 
sing "Have I Done Any Good in the World Today?" and "Do 'What is Right, Let 
the Consequence Follow" and other Church hymns. 

Mother always prepared her Sunday dinner on Saturday, so that she would be 
free to take us to Church on Sunday. I'm sure it wasn't easy to bathe and 
dress si>: little children and get then to Church on tine looking clean and 
pressed. Mother was firm but kind. She expected us to be quiet and rever- 
ant in Church. 

Mother designed and made most of our clothes. She was also a wonderful 
cook and was well known for her delicious pies and cookies. She was also 
very particular about her appearance. 

One of the fondest memories that I have of my Father is when he would re- 
turn from a buying trip back East for his company. ,ve were always so 
happy to see him, and after hugs 



and kisses were exchanged, he 
would bring out a gift for each 
of us. He had a way of making 
us feel very special. He was 
never cross with us, and I 
adored him, so when my Father 
and Mother separated I was ter- 
ribly hurt. 

My brother Ed and I went to work 
after school, and before long I 
had a job at the Telephone Com- 
pany. rVithin a year I was a 
Supervisor, teaching and train- 
ing new operators, both local 
and long distance. 

In 192S Mother married David 
Robison. The following year on 
August 14, 1929, I married Joseph 
Delbert Marriott in the Salt Lake 
Temple. .v'e have been very happy. 



Deb and Helen 1929 




-*7- 



At that time the country was in a very bad depression. I continued to 
work so my husband could get a start in the sheep business. He became 
very successful. 

In 1938 on April 30th our son Roger was born. Roger has four sons: Scott, 
Troy, Stephen and Todd. His wife is Wilhelmina. oenes. 

On August 28, 1942, our daughter Jolene was born. She is the Mother of 
six children: Jodie, Holly, ;iecky, Michael, Jeremie, and Ann. Jolene 
is married to Hldon Fontenot. 

We were blessed with another daughter on February 5, 1945. vie named her 
kay Hall Marriott. She is married to Rollo Peterson, and they have five 
children: Allyne, Douglas, Debra, Mark, and Crisann. 



In 1945 we decided to build a motel 
on the large lot adjoining our home 
on vashington 3oulevard. I could 
helo manage this and still be at 
home to take care of our children. 
I met many wonderful and interes- 
ting people from all over the 
world, who had stayed at our motel. 
Some of them returned again and 
again. I also took care of my 
invalid Mother-in-law for twelve 
years, so I was busy. 

After Mother Marriott passed away 
we sold the motel and bought a 
home in North Ogden. After our 
children were married, I went 
back to work at the United States 
Forest Service for two years. 
Then I went to work at the De- 
fense Depot Communications for 
twelve years. 

I have a wonderful husband, a wonder- 
ful brother and three sisters, three 
wonderful children, and fifteen 
beautiful grandchildren, so I feel 
very blessed. I have great faith in 
my Heavenly Father, f n r I know that 
he hears and answers our prayers. 



Helen holding lay. 
Jolene, Roger 





c* 


* 


-■- * vl 








Jt 






>■■ ML 







■ %%- 



iJeb, Roger, Jolene, Helen, kuy 





kay and Rollo 



- 







Steven, Troy, Roper 

. ; i1heinina 

Todd 




•a?- 



f 







\ 





■fa- 



(Previous Page) 
Cldon Fontenot and Jolcne . v arriott Fontenot 
Michael, Ann, Jeremie 



Jodie 




Holly 



Rebecca (Becky) 





'ft- 



Rollo and Kay Marriott Peterson & Far.ily 
Allyn, Douglas, Debra, Crisann and Mark 




Helen iMarriott 




Roger and .Vilhelnina 
Marriott 



■ r 13 



Hall Reunion 1967 
Roy, Utah 






Deb and Helen 




?y- 



.VILLIAM CARLSON HALL 

.Vives: Hester Armstrong and Grace Viola Gray Hellmuth 
Children: Joan and Marian 

.Villian Carlson Hall was born February 20, 1910, in lleasant View, Ltah, 
the third child of Sarah Helena Carlson and Edward Spackman Hall. He was 
baptized on May 5, 1918. He was a very kind and fun-loving boy who en- 
joyed teasing his sisters. .*e had many happy times together. After 
graduating from Ogden High School he went to California, where he was 
employed by paramount Studios in Hollywood, painting scenery for their 
movies. 

Bill 




■9^- 



On September 24, 1930, Bill married Hester Armstrong and had two lovely 
c^ughters, Jonn and Marian, who were both very musically talented. They 
sang together professionally and also played the guitar. Joan sang for 
a number of years wL th the group called the Frontiersmen. 3ill was so 
proud of his children and loved them very much. 

3oth girls were married, and Marian had two children, Shirley and Bill 
Landers. They are all living in California. Bill and Hester were later 
divorced, and on November 3, 1955, he married Grace Viola Gray Hellmuth. 



Bill died on November 9, 1958. 
miss him. 



>Ve all loved him very much and truly 



Hester 
Joan and Marian (left) 




-9&>- 



oill 




Joan 



Marian 





*> 



97- 



Joan Hall 



Marian Hall 




-99- 



Bill's Children and Grandchildren 




■??• 



BERMCE CARLSON HALL SHEETS 



Husband: Heber 3itner Sheets 
Children: Elaine and Alan Wayne 

I was born on January 16, 1913, the fifth child of Sarah Helena Carlson 
and Edward Snackman Hall. It was in a little white house in i'leasant View, 
just north of Ogden, Utah. We later moved to Ogden, where I attended Madi- 
son School, Central Junior High, Ogden High School, and Weber College. I 
was baptized on February 6, 1921, while we were living in the Sixth ulard. 



One of my fond memories of my childhood was 
coming home from school and enjoying the aroma 
of home made bread baking in the oven and chili 
sauce cooking on the stove. I also remember our 
family going for rides in our Model T. Ford, and 
having to put un the "isinglass windows" when 
the weather was cold. 

Our parents were divorced in 1927, causing 
great sorrow in our home. However, we loved 
our Father, inspite of everything, and hope 
our family can be together in our Eternal Life. 



iernice 




Bernice - 1970 In Ogden High School I was editor 

of the Quarterly Classicum and gave 
the Salutatory address at the grad- 
uation exercises, May 29, 1930. 
While attending Weber College I 
worked for most of my tuition and 
board and room in the Girls' Dormi- 
tory, but I also appreciated the 
help of my dear family, especially 
Ed and Helen, who had to go to work 
before finishing school. Ed was so 
good to all of us in so many ways, 
taking the place of our Father. I 
was elected vice-president of the 
Freshman Class, was queen of the 
annual Carnival Ball, and was an 
attendant to the Oueen of the Acorn 
Ball. 

I graduated from .Veber College on 
May 27, 1932, with a certificate to 
teach in the elementary grades. However I had the opportunity to be the 
secretary to President Aaron i*. Tracy and later President Leland H. Creer, 
both very fine presidents of the college. It was preat experience which 
I enjoyed very much. During 1933 I was in the hospital with a broken back 
for two and a half months, during which time my friends and family were so 
good to me. 




/CV 



On December 19, 1936, I was married to Heber Bitner Sheets, son of Heber 
Snencer Sheets and Mary Esther Bitner Sheets. I had met him while on vaca- 
tion at Brighton, up Big Cottonwood Canyon, east of Salt Lake City. .tfe had 
a lovely wedding and reception at tfeber College, and our marriage was later 
solemnized in the Spit Lake Temple. 



Hebe 



In 1940 we moved to Po- 
catello, Idaho, where my 
husband worked for Idaho 
Refining Company, which 
later became part of 

hillips Petroleum Com- 
pany. While there our 
two dear children were 
born: £lain^ July 23, 
1942; and Alan .Vayne, 
February 11, 1945. <ie 
later moved to Preston, 
Idaho, then to Twin J^alls 
in 1948, and in January 
of 1949 we were trans- 
ferred to Salt Lake City, 
buring that move we had 
to follow a snow plow 
most of the way, because 
it was the most severe 
winter in many years. 




Hlaine, Hebe, Bernice and Alan 



■10/ 



•Ve bought our first home in June of 1949, and less than a year later, 
Hebe had a very severe heart attack and was in the hospital for a month. 
•Ve were so thankful for his complete recovery. The children both attended 
the University of Utah, and each one filled a mission for the Church — 
Alan to the East Central States, and Elaine a stake mission while her boy 
friend was on a mission in England. Elaine was married to Thomas Dean Sevy 
in the Salt Lake Tenple on August 19, 1964 by ''resident Nathan Eldon Tanner. 
Alan married Sandra Lee Nelson in the same Temple on September 17, 1969, 
with Elder LeGrande Richards officiating. Cmr dear Mother passed away on 
September 23, 1066, at our hone in Salt Lake City, where I took care of her 
during her illness. She was a wonderful Mother, whom we all loved dearly. 

Hebe and Be mice 1969 




Elaine 



Alan 





/6Z- 



.Ve were transferred to Seattle, .Vashington, in January of 1967, when Hebe 
was promoted to Division Manager for Phillips letroleum Company. ..'e bought 
a home across Lake Washington in Newport Hills, part of Bellevue. In July 
of 1970 Hebe's office was moved to San Mateo, California, where we again 
bought a home. However, in September, just after getting settled, Hebe 
suffered a stroke, which caused him paralysis on one side as well as the 
loss of speech. .Vhile in the hospital the Bishop of our ward gave him a 
blessing, and after only S days he was completely well again. I am so 
grateful for the healing power of the Priesthood, acting for our Heavenly 
Father; it was indeed a miracle. however, it must have been his time to 
leave us, for just 2\, months later, on November 19, 1970, he passed away 
suddenly with heart failure. It was a terrible shock, but I was thankful 
he did not have to suffer. '.ve brought him home to Salt Lake City for 
burial, and while here for the funeral I found a condominium at Carriage 
Lane, making the move again in January of 1971. 

I have adjusted to the new life of being alone by keeping busy and enjoy- 
ing my children and eight grandchildren. Alan and his family live here in 
Salt Lake City, but Elaine and her family live in Gaithersburg, Maryland, 
just out of Washington, D.C. , where her husband works for the Department 
of Health and Human Services. I have been able to visit then about once 
a year, and they are so good to take me on many si r **t seeing trips, such as 
to the Capitol, the .Vhite House, and the many other points of interest. 
On one of the trips they took me to New York to see the L.D.S. pageant 
at the Hill Cummorah, which was- a very special experioi ce. 

In May of 1975 I was sustained as the Holladay Stake Relief Society Presi- 
dent, and in June of 197Q I was called to be an Ordinance .vorker in the 
Salt Lake Temple — both very spiritual experiences. I am now involved in 
doing Genealogical work for the Church, called German .Extraction. Through 
the years I have held many other Church positions, all of which have brought 
a great deal of satisfaction: Primary teacher, Sunday School organist, 
Secretary and Counselors in Relief Society, and, while living in the state 
of .Vashington, I was a Stake Missionary for about a year until we moved 
to California. After a period of inactivity in my life, I have found 
great happiness and peace of mind in the Church and its many activities. 

In December of 1973 I had the opportunity to go on a B.Y. U. tour to Israel, 
where we spent Christmas in the Holy Land. It was a spiritual experience 
I shall never forget. In November of 1974 I had the privilege of attending 
the dedication of the beautiful Washington D.C. Temnle with my daughter, 
Elaine, and her husband, Tom, who sang in the choir. .Ve were fortunate to 
be seated in the Solemn Assembly Room, where President Spencer .V. Kimball 
read the dedicatory prayer. There was such a beautiful spirit there, 
which confirmed my testimony that he was truly a ironhet of God. In June 
of 1978 I went with a group of Relief Society sisters to Nauvoo, Illinois, 
to the dedication of the Monument to Women, and we toured many of the 
other places of Church interest. 

I have enjoyed living here at Carriage Lane, where I have made many dear 
friends who have the same interests. When I first moved here I was able 



-I OB- 



to resume my oil painting, which I started while living in Washington, a 
hobby which I really enjoy. I haven't had too much time for it the last 
few years, but plan to get started again soon. 



I an so prnteful for my children and g 
me much joy and happiness. Elaine nnd 
on September 25, 1965, in Salt Lake Ci 
National Honorary Society and has rece 
to the C.Y.I'.); Nathan Andrew, born No 
John Thomas, born September 3, 1971, i 
Karen, born February 17, 1974, in .Vash 
children were all born in Salt Lake Ci 
Jeffrey Alan, May S, 1974; Laura iVarie 
January 27, 1980. 



randchildren — they have brought 
Ton had 4 children: Janet, born 
ty, (She has been inducted into the 
ived a National Merit Scholarship 
vember 19, 1967, in Snlt Lake City; 
n Havre de Grace, Maryland; and 
ington, b.C. Alan and Sandy's four 
ty: Christine, September 7, 1971; 
, September 9, 1976; and Midi elle, 



I am very thankful for the testimony I have of the truthfulness of the 
Gospel of Jesus Christ, and pray that we may sone day be united as a 
family in our Eternal Life. 

Bernice in 1980 




-joy- 



Tom and Blaine Sevy - Nathan, John, ^aren, Janet 









Christine 
Sandra 
Alan 
Jeffrey 
Laura 
Michelle 
(on lap) 



-US- 



JOSEl'HINE CARLSOK HAIL WHEELWRIGHT 

Husbands: Edison Grover Toone, Paul Telford, and Norman 

George .vneelwright 
Children: ..'ilford Enerson (3ill), Steven Edison, and 

Richard Kail 

I was born September 10, 1915, in the little town of Pleasant Vic, I tan, 
the 6th child of Edward Snackman ilall and Sarah Helena Carlson Hall, 

My parents were separated when I was quite young, but I do renei.-.ber my 
Father as a kind and loving person when he was with us. It was quite a 
struggle for ny '-.other to raise 6 children without the help of a husband 
to provide for them. My brother Ed and sister Helen both quit school and 
found jobs to help support the family. .lie would always look nice in the 
clothes Mother sewed for us. 

• >'hen I was about 14 years of age my Mother married David a. Kobison from 
."organ, Utah. He was a fine nan and treated us like his own children. lie 
had one son, i>elbert, and a daughter, U:la. It was during the depression, 
and I remember how thankful we were when he found a job for $5.00 a day. 

I graduated fron Morgan High School in 1934 and married Edison Grover 
Toone in 1935 in the Salt Lake Temple. 



Tose->hire 



Edison 




■16b- 



•e made our home in Croydon, Utah, with the rest of the Toone families. 
That was quite an experience, because we were really living the "United 
Order". The five Toone sons all had their jobs to do, but whatever money 
was made was turned over to Grandmother Toone. In turn, whenever we needed 
anything, we went to her for it. 



Each summer the daughter-in-laws would get together and can hundreds of 
quarts of fruit for the sheep camp. They would kill E to 10 pips, which 
they would cure for winter, and they would render gallons of lard. The 
sheep, cattle, and farming kept everyone busy during the summer. It was 
always a big event when the families would get together to put up the hay, 
do the thrashing, and shear the sheen. There would be 25 to 30 people at 
each meal. Everyone had a job to do on those busy days. Edison was away 
with the sheep most of the winters, so that left r.e alone with our three 
little boys, Bill, Steve, and Richard. It was so cold that the windows 
in our little house would frost up, and it would sometimes be weeks before 
we could see out. ./e would heat bricks in the oven and put then in our 
beds to keep warn at night. 

Because we wanted our boys to be raised with a Father, we decided to move 
away from Croydon and the rest of the Toone families. ->e found a nice home 
in liuntsville, where Edison worked for the Forest Service and farmed our 100 



Steven 



Richard 



Bill 




-ibl- 



acres we bought. I can truthfully say that the two years we livec. in 
Huntsville were the happiest years of my life. After two years, however, 
the Toone family convinced us to return to Croydon. After being so happy 
in Huntsville for two years, it was very hard for us to be contented back 
in Croydon. Ve noved into n basement house in October and had a long hard 
winter. 3y spring we were ready to move again and found a farm in • anes- 
ville, Vtah. ..'e were extremely "oor, but we were happy to be on our own 
again. The house was small, but we had 100 acres and a herd of mills cows, 

Edison was put in the bishopric, and I worked in the Mutual. .v'e worked 
hard on the farm and again found many good friends. In 1954 Edison, Steven 
and others went hunting up Lost Creek. As they were going up a hill to their 
camp, the horse that Edison was riding turned and started to buck down the 
hill. They rushed him to the bee hospital in Ogden, where they found that 
he had a broken neck. He was in the hospital for 6 weeks before lie passed 
away. One night as I was sitting at Edison's bedside, I resident uavid 0. 
McKay walked in to give him a blessing. Another tine Elder LeC-rande Rich- 
ards also came to see him and again he received a blessing. Those were 
two nights I will never forget. I guess he was needed somewhere else. 

My family and friends helped me to get through those b weeks by staying 
with Edison at nir;ht and part of the day. Mother and Lad Robison moved 
down and stayed with the boys, so I could spend my time with Edison. I 
surely appreciated the kindness that everyone showed during this trying 
time. The boys were still young, and it was hard for then to get the 
milking done before they went to school each morning. 

In 1955 I met and later married Paul Telford, who had two sons, Paul and 
Donald. That was an experience I will never forget, trying to raise five 
teen age boys. ,Ve all went to Church, together and Paul Sr. became the .Vard 
Clerk. he and his boys had never been active in the Church, so their new 
life was ouite different from what they had been used to. After seven 
years together we separated, and he went back to California. Sometimes 
a divorce can be harder to accept than a death. Paul died of cancer 
July 26, 1982. The two boys both live in California now and have pood 
wives and families. 




Paul and Josephine 



-lot- 



I 



'. 



w 









I worked as secretary to the Veber County Commissioners for 4 years; they 
were great ner, to work for. The next 1? yenrs I worked for Ruth 01 sen, 
the .v'eber County Recorder, nnd retired September 10, 1981. 

1 married Norman C. 
Josephine and Norm Wheelwright July 22, 

1964. lie was presi- 
dent of Wheelwright 
Construction Company 
that built a lot of 
roads and bridges 
throughout Itah and 
Nevada. he has one 
son, Kent, and his 
wife, Bonnie, who 
have two boys and 
two girls. They 
have always been 
very special to me, 

While visiting friends 
in Iiuntsville, we saw 
a lovely log home on 
the lake for sale. 
After selling our 
Mobile Home we moved 
to Huntsville on a 
cold stormy winter 
day. It was a fun 
place to live, because we could fish and go boating in our back yard. After 
seven years in iiuntsville, we sold our home to Richard and Cleo and moved 
into a condominium in Ogden. It didn't take long to know that was a mis- 
take, so we found us another home with a big yard, because we both enjoy 
gardening. 

hdison and I had 3 
sons: .Vilfo rd Jimer- 
son, born July 3, 
1937; Steven Edison, 
born March 16, 19 40; 
and Richard Hall, 
born July 30, 1942. 



Richard 
Bill 

Steve 
Josephine 






-101- 



Richard and Clco 



Steven, and Marilyn 



Jill and Marie 




Our son Vilford iimerson (Bill) married Marie Stimpson May 27, 1955, and 
they have five sons who are all married. 

Their oldest son, Craig, married Julie Ann .veils, December 4, 1975, 

and they have two sons, I3rarien and Caleb. 
Their second son, Scott Howard, Married Vicky Lynn .Morton November 5, 

1977. They have two children, Crystal and Jeremy. 
Their third son, 3lake .'.'ilford, married 1 in S. .Vainer on November 20, 

1976. They have ^ne daughter named Michelle. 
Their fourth son, Chris David, married Carol Ann Powers on March 6, 

1981, They have one son, Billy, and another one due right soon. 
Their youngest son, Kevin, married Gv/enda Battistone on March IS, 1982. 

Our second son, Steven Hdison, married Marilyn Benson, March 22, 1960. 
They have three children, Darin, David, and a daughter Lesha. 

Our youngest son, Richard, married Cleo Haacke on the 27th of May 1966. 
They have four sons, Troy, Travis, Tyler, Trent John, and one daughter, 
Tif f ani. 

All of our sons and their families live close to Ogden, so we feel very 
fortunate to have then near to us. 



-I/O 



Bill, Marie & 5 sons 
Craig, Scott, Bla'^e, Chris, Kevin 



Marie k Bill Toone 




Steven & Marilyn Toone 
Marvin Begay, Darin, David 
Lesha 



Richard & Cleo Toone 
Tiffani, Troy, Travis, 
Tyler, Trent (Insert) 





-/// 



JOSEPHINE'S GRANDCHILDREN AND GREAT GRANDCHILDREN 




Julie & Craig Toone 
Braoen & Caleb 



Vickie & Scott Toone 
Crystal & Jeremy 



Gwenda & 
Kevin Toone 



Kim & Blake Toone 
Michelle 




1/2.- 



Carol, Chris & Billy 




Hall Reunion 1967 
Josephine, Norm and Panily 




113- 



IRJiNE HALL HOEHNE 

Husband: Herbert Fred Hoehne 

Children: lionita Louise, Olinda Leigh, Lucille N'.arie, 
David Henry, and Curtis John 

Before I start on my history, I would like to thank my parents for bringing 
me into this world, so that I night give birth to ny five children. There 
is a auote that has helped me along my life and would like to have my 
children and grandchildren contemplate and remember: "The most interesting 
thing about any human being is the values by which he or she lives. Un- 
fortunately, most of us never take the tine to sit down and really think 
through the moral precepts that unconsciously guide our lives." The fol- 
lowing "daily dozen" constitute the personal creed of Robert Louis Stevenson: 

1. fake up your mind to be happy! learn to find pleasure in simple things. 

2. Make the best of your circumstances. No one has everything, and every- 
one has something of sorrow intermingled with the gladness of life. The 
trick is to make the laughter outweigh the tears. 

3. Don't take yourself too seriously. Don't think that somehow you should 
be protected from misfortunes that befall others. 

4. You can't please everybody. Don't let criticism worry you. 

5. Don't let your neighbors set your standards. Be yourself. 

6. Do the things you enjoy doing, but stay out of debt. 

7. Don't borrow trouble. Imaginary things are harder to bear than the 
actual ones. 

S. Since hate poisons the soul, do not cherish enmities or grudges. Avoid 
people who make you unhappy. 

9. Have many interests. If you can't travel, reac about new nlaces. 

10. Don't hold postmortems. Don't spend your life brooding over sorrows 
and mistakes. Don't be one who never gets over things. 

11. Do what you can for those less fortunate than yourself. 

12. I eep busv at something. A very busy person never has tine to be 
unhappy. 

T was the last of 7 children born to Sarah Helena Carlson and Edward Spack- 
man Hall. Mother was thirty-six ye?rs of age, and she called in the doctor 
to deliver ne at home, March 28, 191?. My oldest sister, Helen, was only 
10 years of age, and she tells ne that she would take me for rides in the 
buggy in the park when I becane fussy and cried. It must have been hard 
to have six children, all under the age of 12 in our small bungalow on 
v uincy Avenue in Ogden, Utah, where I was born. My Father worked as a 
salesman at .Vrirrhts Department Store, and 1 am sure did not make very much 
money. 

Vhen I was only two years of age my Father and Mother were separated. My 
oldest brother, Edward, was only fourteen years of age and went to work 
to help support our family. I don't remember too many of the hardships 
that we must have gone through, but I do remember having oranges only at 
Christmas time. Mother would prepare meals with what she had. I remem- 
ber her making a treat for us with cocoa and sugar on bread. 



\H- 



I remember going up to iV'illard to visit Grandma Carlson and her sister 
(Auntie), who lived in a little log home. She would always give us one 
of her sugar squares that she put in her coffee. One day when my sisters 
and I went to visit her, we got off the Bamberger train and took a short- 
cut through a farmer's field. Since I had on a red cape, a bull ch aseu me 
all the way, but I got away from him by climbing through the fence to safety. 
There have been many tines in my lifetime that the Lord has protected me from 
danger. I remember when I was really small skating down the 24th street 
hill and being protected from hitting into cars at the end of the hill. 

">ne of the sad things in my youth was when I was in a play at one of the 
big theaters, and I was to sing the song, "love at Hone". I had told my 
Mother the wrong theater and was crushed when I found out she had not seen 
ny "big performance". That night must have made an impression on me, as 
1 was determined all the rest of my youth to perform in plays and operas. 
When we were young children living on 24th street, we used to put on plays 
with the Shurtliff children in their huge two-story home. In my high school 
days at Morgan High and at .teber College 1 was able to be in their pro- 
ductions. When I grew up and went away to work I even joined choirs, and 
the one I remember best was the Temple Square Mission Choir, led by Freder- 
ick Davis. 



In the summers before I went to 
high school, 1 used to go to 
Bountiful and work in the 
fields picking cherries and 
peas. I lived with my step- 
sister and her husband, Lula 
and Chester Brough, and helped 
tend their children and work 
for them. I also worked for 
a dentist's wife to pay for my 
dental work. I also worked in 
the fields thinning beets. I 
am grateful, however, for the 
opportunity of learning how 
to work. It strengthened ny 
ability to cope with the stress 
and trials that have cone into 
my life as a wife and mother. 

I want to te] 1 of an experience 
while I was a Wave in the United 
-tat os "avy in .Vorld War II. I 
worked in the Medical Hospital 
where all the w ■uinded were 
brought. One day one of the 
doctors had to go to the Warner 
Brothers Studios in Hollywood 
to see Mickey Kooney. He asked 
me if I would like to go with 
him, and on the way he asked me 
which movie star I would like 
to see. Of course I said, 



Irene as a Wave in the Navy 




- / IS- 



"Clark Gable". t«ell, my drear: cane true, and I was able to shake hands 
with hin. He was very cordial and so handsome in his uniform. 

My other experiences in the Navy are too lengthy to tell at this time, 
but it was while I was dancing at the i'aladiun in Hollywood that 1 met my 
husband, Herbert Fred Hoehne (fror. Cuero, Texas), so my life was really 
changed from that time on. .»"e were married on March 24, 1945, and made 
our first home in Long Beach, California. 



Irene and Herbe 




Later, when we were living 
in Apple Valley Ranches, 
after we had three child- 
ren, we were faced with 
several trials. It was on 
Christmas Hve, and as we 
drove ur to our hone we 
could see water running 
out of the front door. 
As we opened it up we could 
see the Christmas presents 
under the tree floating in 
water. The pipes had fro- 
zen and broken. The in- 
sulation had fallen through 
the ceiling into the baby's 
bed. ,ve shut off the water 
and drove to the home of 
some friends where we spent 
Christmas. It was shortly 
after this disaster that 
the Church Branch i resident 
and all the members cane 
out and helped us clean up 
the house. They brought 
food, clothes, and wood 
to burn. 



Through these trials and 
1 



hardships the Lord touched 
my husband's heart, and he 
was baptized. My prayers 
had been answered! He became active in the Church and was set apart as one 
of the first counselors when the Branch was made into a Ward. When we moved 
to Utah we were able to take our four children and go through the Salt Lake 
Tervile, where we were sealed together as a family for Time and Eternity. 
It was a marvelous experience. 



Our lives have been blessed with five children: Bonita Louise, Olinda 
Leigh, Lucille Marie, David Henry, and Curtis John. They have blessed us 
with fifteen lovely grandchildren. 



//&■ 



Lucille , 
Jlinda, 
Bonita , 
David, 
Curtis 



Ik 





Ve have had nany happy family trips together. It was in the summer 
of 1079, when Olinda and John were visiting us from Germany, we took the 
whole family down to Lake Lowell for a week. There were 11 adults and 
<S children -- Jlinda's baby was only 3 months old. .Ve had a 25 foot Cabin 
Crtiser, a 13 foot Boston .vhaler, a kayak, two rubber rafts, 2 tents and 
a 30 foot Vogue i-.otor Lome, a car and a truck. Never having had such an 
experience before like that in C-ermaiy, York (Olinda and John's son) now 
wants to come back to the Lnited States to live. They are now planning 
on moving back in 19S5 or 1986. 



■in- 



«ie love to travel in our Motor Home to California to visit our son Curtis 
and family in Rancho Cardova and to Cuero, Texas (by the C-ulf of Mexico), 
to visit Herbert's folks, as well as many other places. Last year I was 
able to fly over to >Vest Germany to visit Olinda and her husband, John 
Reynolds, and their three children: Alaina Beth, t-athryn, and York. It 
was a delightful trip, and while there I was also able to travel to Swe- 
den, where my Mother was born. Olinda is a very talented artist and has 
sold many of her paintings, 

Lucille' s husband, Frank Mohlman, is a Bishop and an attorney, and they 
live in Tooele, Utah, with their fmir children: Mathhew, Anna, Andrew, 
and Bethany. Another child is due any day now. Lavid is married to Debra 
Snencer, and they hive 'hree children: David Kent, Aaron, and Sarah. 
Bonita is a medical technologist at the University of Utah Medical Center. 
She is a fan for all the sports, and is so good to all her nieces and 
nephews. She loves to ma're afghans for everyone. Curtis married Joanne 
Jacox, and they have three sons and a daughter: Jacob, Heather, Joshua, 
and Johnathan. The children have been married in the Temple and are active 
in Church. I an so thankful that we moved to Bountiful, I'tah, where the 
children have been able to associate with friends that enjoy the same things 
they do. Three of the children filled missions for the Church: Olinda in 
.Vest Germany, bavid in the New -England States, and Curtis in Mexico. 

The family at Olinda's .Veddciing Reception 




My Church activities have included being a Primary 
teacher, chorister in all of the organizations, Mutual teacher, r-resident 
and teacher of Relief Society, choir member as well as soloist for many 
Church programs. 

My working days have included the State Legislature, when I first got out 
of college; then I wd rked for Furmbilt Clothing Store in Salt Lake City; 
then I went to Washington, * ere I worked for Bendix Aviation Limited. It 



■ni- 



was during World War IT that 1 went to Los \ngeles to work. I also worked 
10 years at the Deseret Book Conmany and an now working for the l ; tah State 
Department of Health, where I have been for the past 15 years as a secretary 
to the Director of the bureau of Health Statistics. 



In looking back over my life, I realize I have nissed knowing so nany fine 
peonle in our Father's family. I know very few of then, and T didn't ever 
have the on-^ortunity to know my Grandmother and Grandfather Hall. I am so 
grateful that we are having a history printed so that we c?n get acquainted 
and know more about the Hall family. 



Ijonita 



ii'e are celebrating our 38th 
bedding Anniversary today, the 
24th of March, 1983. 1 hope 
and pray that our lives will 
be more useful, and that we 
will be able to have the 
health and strength to enjoy 
retirement, which will be 
soon. We are living at 356 
Hast 1600 South in Bountiful, 
Utah, 84010. >Ve would love 
to meet all of our relatives 
and visit wi th them some day. 
Our telephone number is 
(801) 295-4469. 




The Mohlmans 
Frank and Lucille 
Anna, Andrew, Bethany 

and Matthew 



//?■ 



The Reynolds Family 
Alaina, John 
Olinda, York 
Kathryn 

December 1982 




mo 



Debra and 

David Hoehne 



David Kent 
Sarah 
Aa ro n 




Curtis and 

Joanne Hoehne 

Jacob and Heather 
Johnathan and Joshua 



-121- 



Hall Reunion — 1967 
Curtis, David, Irene, Herbe, Olinda, Bonita, and Lucille 




Michael David Mohlnan 
3orn June 24, 1983, just in tine to be in the book. 




/22' 




CHAPTER IV 



EMMA SPACkMAN HALL CRITTENDEN 



Husband 



Lyman Crittenden 



Children 



Alvira (Arlene) Hall 
Gerald Hall 
Luella Hall 
Pauline Hall 
oessie Mae Hall 
Betty Mae Hall 



-JZ3- 



EMMA SPACKMAN HALL CRITTENDEN 

Husband: Lyman Crittenden 

Children: Alvira (Arlene), Gerald, Luella, Pauline, 
Bessie Mae, and Bettie Mae 

Emma Spackman Hall was born in Salt Lake City, Utah on May 24, 1884, to 
Naomi Emma Spackman and John Hall. She was reared in Salt Lake City, 
graduated from high school, and attended three years of college at the 
University of Utah. 

She met Lyman Crittenden at a baseball game at Henefer on August 6, 1910, 
and they were married for Time and Eternity in the Salt Lake Temple on 
October 19, 1910. They made their home in Koytsville, Utah, in the family 
home — a lovely two story brick house, on a cattle and hay farm, as his 
Mother, Elizabeth Wareing, died May 14, 1909. 

Emna was active in all 
Church activities of the 
Summit Stake, especially 
the Ward Choir. They had 
four children born in this 
house: Alvira (Arlene), 
10 August 1911; Gerald, 2 
September 1912; Luella, 12 
March 1915; and Pauline, 
12 November 1917. Lyman's 
father died 4 August 1919. 
In April of 1920 they moved 
to Union, Salt Lake County, 
on to a 21 acre fruit and 
berry farm, where Emma 
canned the fruit, berries 
and garden vegetables to 
keep the cellar full. She 
sewed and made most of our 
clothes. Lyman also worked 
at the Smelter Assay Office 
in Midvale to pay for the 
farm. Twin daughters, Bessie 
Mae and Bettie Mae, were born 
on 31 May 1922. Aunt Flor- 
ence was there to help out 
at that time and recalls 
that instead of using bottles 
they fed the babies with 
small hand painted china 
cups that Aunt Josephine 
had painted. 




Emma 



IzH- 



Lyman Crittenden 




Five Daughters 1944 



Gerald 



/Zf- 



In the Union Ward, Jordan Stake, Hmma taught Sunday School and later was 
Secretary and Superintendent of Religion Class and Treasurer of Relief 
Society. In 1923 she was set apart as President of Relief Society, and 
served faithfully in this capacity until poor health forced her to resign 
in the spring of 1926. The next fall she was sustained as Theology tea- 
cher in Relief Society, and Gleaner Girl Instructor in MIA. In the fall 
of 1926 she was sustained as MIA President. This was the position she 
held at the time of her death, December 14, 1929, of ruptured appendix. 

Besides her active life in the various organizations of the Church, she 
was a devoted wife and mother, giving her husband and children the best 
of care. She taupht her children to sing and v ^lay instruments and took 
pride in their accomplishments. 



iimma 



Lyman and one of his 
prize peaches. 




■ IZ0> 



Pauline recalled the following memories of her Mother. "Mother died when 
I was 11 years old, but there are several things I do remember about her. 
She was a very proud person. itfe didn't have very much, but she was always 
one of the first Deople to help someone that was sick or had an accident 
of needed help of any kind. She would take a loaf of bread, cake, eggs, or 
something to heln out; I know because I was with her many times. 

"My Father got sick and had to have an operation. The ward would hold a 
benefit dance for people in the ward who needed help. They had a dance 
for my folks; I remember this very well, because one of my school friend's 
folks had had one for then a month before, as her Dad had been ill, also. 
One day she came to school with a nev; box of crayons and a candy bar. She 
said her Mother gave her a dime from the money. I asked my Mother for a 
dine, and she said, ' .Vhat for, honey?' I told her about my friend and 
said I wanted to get the sane thing. She said I couldn't have it, because 
we're not keeping the extra money. She said the other people in the ward 
needed it more. She gave the money back to the ward. 

"I won't forget the night before she went to the hospital. She was in 
pain and sitting at the kitchen table working on a Temple apron. She 
said, 'I have got to finish this tonight.* She did, but she never came 
home from the hospital. 

"I remember one fellow that used to be in a large family that lived through 

the field from us. he has told me more than once that if it hadn't been 

for my Mother, he would have gone on a very wrong road, which he had started. 
He now works in the Temple most every day. 



"My Father loved Mother very much, as she was his one and only, and he 
never even thought about getting remarried." 



Aunt Mabel and Lyman 



■Vally, Dick, Arlene, Pauline, Lyman 
Calvin, Clifton, Luella, Sharon, I.a.Mar 





10-1- 



Services for Union 
Resident Held Tuesday 

It is with sincere regret and deep 
sorrow that we report the death of a 
most beloved woman of our ward, 
Mrs. Emma Crittenden, on Saturday, 
.December 14, at 9:19, at the St. 
Marks hospital, following an opera- 
tion. Airs. Crittenden has been a 
resident of Union for a number of 
years and has held several positions 
in the L. D. S. church. She first 
acted as Religion class principal, and 
after doing a wonderful work there 
was called to serve as president of 
the Relief society. Failing health 
caused her to give up her work in 
this capacity. After a few years, she 
again was called to act as president 
or the Y. L. M. I. A., which position 
she held at the time of her passing. 
She was a faithful, true Latter-day 
Saint, always mindful of^the happi- 
ness and comfort of others. Her loss 
win be so keenly felt in the entire 
community because she endeared her- 
self to all who knew her. She leaves 
her husband, Lyman Crittenden, and 
the following children: Alvira, Ger- 
ald, Louella, Pauline, Bettie and Bes- 
sie; her mother, Mrs. Hall, and sev- 
eral brothers and sisters. 

Beautiful and impressive were the 
funeral services which were held for 
her Tuesday, December 17, at 1 
o'clock in the Union ward chapel, 
Bishop Horace Godfrey in charge. 
The opening song, "Tho' Deepening 
Trials," was rendered by members of 
the M. I. A. Arthur Erickson of- 
the bishopric offered the invocation. 
"My Father Knows" was sung by Mr. 
Angus Green. The first speakers 
were Mrs. M. B. Andrus of the stake 
M. I. A. presidency and Miss Iona 
Oborn, second counsellor in the ward 
M. I. A. 

A violin solo, "A Perfect Day," was 
given by Don Nicol, Mrs. Lucy God- 
frey, accompanist. President J. 
George Sharp and Mr. Orson Ryan 
of Logan, a lifelong friend of Mr. 
Crittenden, were the next speakers. 
Mrs. Ethel Millerberg sang "Resig- 
nation," previously requested of her 
by Mrs. Crittenden. President Heber 
Burgon and Horace Godfrey also 
spoke. All speakers paid lovely trib- 
ute to her noble character and won- 
derful work performed, and the clos- 
ing number, "Sweet Hour of Prayer," 
was sung by members of the M. I. A. 
The benediction was pronounced by 
Charles Burgon of the bishopric. The 
pallbearers were Orson Berrett, Glen 
Jensen and Curtis Brady, superinten- 
dency of the Sunday school, and Ken- 
neth Brady, Earl Richards and Glen 
Milne of the M. I. A. superintendency. 
The flower girls were of the Beehive 
and the Junior girls of the M. I. A. 
and numbered 20.' Burial was in the 
Salt Lake cemetery where the grave 
was dedicated by Mr. Crittenden of 
Salt Lake, a brother of Mr. Lyman 
Crittenden. 



Lyman Crittenden 

>?,» Sa " cM ke County-Lyman 



Crittenden, gt, 
6955-9th East, died 
of natural causes 
Sunday, 7 a.m., at 
tits home. Born 
Oct. 12, 1879, 
Hoytsville, S u m - 
mlt County, to 
Chauncey Smith 
and Elizabeth 
Warelng Critten- 
den. Married 
Emma Spackman, 
Oct. 19, 1910, Salt 
Lake Temple, 
Church of Jesus 
Christ of Latter- 
day Saints. She 
died Dec. 14, 1929. 
Assayors helper; 
U.S. Smelter and 
Refinery Co. Active member Union 
Second LDS Ward, Temple worker, 
High Priest, activt choir member 
and home teacher. Survivors: son, 
daughters, Gerald Hall, Mrs. Lloyd 
(Pauline) Hlnnen, Mrs. Edwin (Bes- 
sie) Thomas, all Murray; Mrs. Rich- 
ard R. (Arlene) Porter, Pasadena, 
Calif.; Mrs. Wallace (Luella, Judd, 
Coalville, Summit County; 10 grand- 
children, 13 grest-grandchlldren. Fu- 
neral Wednesday, noon, Union Sec- 
ond LDS Ward Chapel. Friends call 
4760 S. State, Tuesday, 7-9 p.m.; 
at chapel Wednesday one hour prior 
to services. Burial, Salt Lake City 
Cemetery. 



S 




-)2$' 



ALVIRA (ARLENE) HALL CRITTENDEN PORTER 

Husband: Richard Verl Porter 

Children: Richard Verl Porter, Jr. (Rick) 

Alvira (Arlene) Hall Crittenden was the eldest child of Emma Spackman 
Hall and Lyman Crittenden, born 10 August 1911, in Hoytsville, Utah, in 
a two-story brick house with lovely pine trees in front. Grandpa Critten- 
den lived with us, and we had fun times until he had a stroke while he was 
chopping wood one morning and died two days later, as I recall. 

I remember all day trips in a model T Ford to Grandpa and Grandma Hall's 
lovely ranch home in the bend of the Jordan River. It had a flowing well, 
California poppies at the back door, a large mulberry tree in the front 
lawn, and was a big two-story brick home where we would slide down the 
bannister. I remember Uncle Heber Wilde, who lived in Coalville, taking 
me on his milk route and feeding me peppermints. 

When I was about six years old there was a talent contest at the Coalville 
Opera House. Mother dressed me up in a cute pink and white dress and ring- 
lets, and I was prepared to sing "Mickie, Pretty Mickie", but as I opened 
my mouth nothing would come out. After three attempts I received a box of 
chocolates for effort. I've never become a public speaker, as hard as I 
have tried with my experiences. 



Arlene and the Model T Ford 



Arlene, Grandma Hall 
and the twins 





I learned to play the piano and was in several 
recitals, and I also taught piano to beginners for several of my teen years. 
We moved to Union, Salt Lake County, in the spring of 1920 where I attended 
Union Elementary School and Jordan High School, graduating in May of 1929. 
I was Ward Organist for many years, starting with a pump organ that a deacon 
would pump for me. 



-/a.?- 



I entered Nurses' Training at L.D. S. Hospital in August of 1929, just after 
I turned 18. My Mother died on December 14th of that year, and her last 
request to me was to finish my training. It was hard for my younger sis- 
ters to shoulder the responsibility of the home, but they all did well, 
and I went home as often as I could. Pauline had a bad case of pneumonia, 
and I was able to be home to nurse her back to health. I graduated as a 
Registered Nurse in May of 1932 and was out of the habit of going to Church, 
as I worked 12 hour shifts or split shifts. I did special duty, still 12 
hour duty from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. at 50<£ an hour, which was good pay then. 
I worked as an R.N. until 1936 when I went to work in the Disbursing Office 
of the U.S. Government, after seeing a bad accident of teenagers on Easter 
morning. 

In December of 1938 I met Rich- 
ard Verl Porter on a blind date 
on Christmas Eve. Then on the 
24th of November, eleven months 
later, at 8 p.m., after a very 
beautiful courtship with formal 
dinners in our homes, we were 
married at a formal wedding in 
the Episcopal Church. On the 
following Christmas Eve the 
company Dick worked for closed, 
and he was without a job. 
During the summer of 1940 we 
moved to Los Angeles, California, 
and I went to work in a Urologi- 
cal office for Dr. kutzman in 
the Wilshire district. I en- 
joyed walking through McArthur 
Park on the way to and from 
work in the beautiful and 
lovely weather. 

In 1944 Dick was drafted into 
the Air Force, and I followed 
him to Fresno and worked during 
his basic training at Fresno 
Hospital, across the street from 
the Base. He was shipped to 
Florida, and I went to Pasadena and worked in a hospital there, staying with 
Uncle Ed and Leah until Dick was discharged six months later on a medical 
discharge. We moved back to Los Angeles, and I worked for the Red Cross 
Blood Bank. I became active in the Los Angeles Chapter of Women's National 
Aeronautical Association, being President and then National President. 

In 1948 we purchased a home at 35 East Montana Street in Pasadena, and I 
went to work in an Oral Surgeons Office for Drs. Prince and Woodard. A 
dedicated Visiting Teacher started me back to Church, and Dick shortly 
followed and was baptized into the L.D.S. Church on March 5, 1955. 




-J 30 



We have both been dedicated member helping with the Lord's work ever since, 
and are so grateful for our testimonies of the truthfulness of the Gospel 
of Jesus Christ and His sacrifice for us and our sins. 



Arlene 
1932 



Dick and Arlene 
1946 





Our son was born S January 1956 on a Sunday morning at 11:35 a.m. My 
father and sister Luella came from Salt Lake City to be with us when we 
were sealed for Time and all Eternity with our son, Richard V. Jr., in 
the Los Angeles Temple, 20 June 1956. I was Sunday School organist, 
Counselor in Relief Society and President for over three years. My 
Father was called home Sunday morning 8 March 1964. 

In June 1964 we had the privilege of accompanying the Yoval Dancers to 
Israel and had a most impressive trip, "walking where Jesus walked" and 
seeing many places talked about in the Bible. On the return we saw the 
Worlds Fair in New York and the Pageant in Palmyra, for an exciting five 
week experience and testimony building. 

In June 1965 we purchased a house in Vista, California, (being forced to 
move due to schooling for Rick and the smog), at 535 Escondido Avenue, 
with a half acre and many fruit trees. I went to work at Tri-City Hospital 
as a Nurse and worked until Easter 1969. In September 1965 I was called 
as a counselor in MIA, and in September 1966 was sustained as president 
of the Vista Ward MIA. 



-131- 



Arlene 




In November 1969 I was elected to Tri-City Hospital Board by a large mar- 
gin and took office in January 1970. In December 1969 I was called as 
Stake President of MIA in Falomar Stake and sustained January 11, 1970, at 
Stake Conference, two great responsibilities at once. MIA Conferences in 
Salt Lake City in 1970 and 1971-72 were so inspirational, the last being 
just 10 days before President Joseph Fielding Srith's quiet passing. 

On September 24, 1972, at Stake Conference our Stake was divided, and I 
was sustained as President of the Carlsbad Stake Relief Society, and in 
October went back to Salt Lake City for Relief Society Conference. Both 
the 1972 and 1973 Conferences were extremely inspirational with President 
Harold B. Lee. In 1973 both Sister Lee and President Lee spoke extem- 
poraneously, and the urgency of his message was so noticeable. In October 



-I 30-- 



1974 Relief Society Conference Barbara Smith was sustained as General 
President of Relief Society, and Sister Belle S. Spafford was released. 
What a great lady! Spencer W. Kimball was President of the Church, and 
what a great privilege it was to sit at the feet of three great prophets. 
That was the last of General Relief Society Conferences, now being done a 
regional basis. 

Rick left July 12, 1975, for the Perth, Australian Mission. On June 5, 
1977, I was released as Stake Relief Society President, as Dick was called 
to the High Council. On February 26, 1978, the Ward was divided and we were 
in Vista III Ward with Bi^ion Phillip Harris, and I was called as Ward 
Relief Society President. 

On October 18, 1980, we were called as Temple Ordinances Workers and set 
apart by President Horace Godfrey. I worked with the brides for nine months, 
and what a choice experience. In October 1981 I was set apart as assis- 
tant to June Knudson, and in June 1982 was set apart as 1st Assistant Super- 
visor to Blanch Logan by President Rosa, our new Temple President. 

I did not run for re-election to the Tri-City Hospital Board in November 
19S2, and my responsibilities ended in January 1983, after serving twice 
as Board President. 

Rick was married in the Salt Lake Temple to Natalie .t'atts on July 5, 1979. 
He graduated from the Brigham Young University on March 24, 1981. A lovely 
daughter, Kara, was born to them February 18, 1981, in t'rovo, Utah, just 
before Rick's graduation. A son, Ryan Richard, was born on February 17, 
1983, in Colorado Springs, Colorado, where they moved in June of 1982. 
Rick is Sales Office Manager for Man Stone Incorporated, which manufac- 
tures cultured marble products. 



Natalie, 

Rick 

Kara, 

Ryan Richard 



April, 1983 




-133- 



Rick is on a committee in Colorado Springs welcoming and housing the 
Olympic Athletes in the final try-outs, which will determine those that 
qualify for the Olympics. Being so athletic himself, he is excited about 
this opportunity. 

Rick and Natalie were asked to do "signing" for the Deaf in their ward 
for the Church meetings. Natalie was assigned for Relief Society and Rick 
for the Priesthood. 

In April of this year (1983) we visited Rick and Natalie and their family 
in their lovely new home in Colorado Springs, and enjoyed seeing our new 
grandson along with his two year old sister. 



Rick, Natalie, Kara, and Ryan Richard 
April 1983 




73 y- 



GERALD HALL CRITTENDEN 

Wife: Grace Pihl 

Children: Darlene, Terry, and Colette 

Gerald (Jerry) Hall Crittenden was born 2 September 1912 in Hoytsville, 
Utah, the only son of Enna Spackman Hall and Lyman Crittenden. lie gradu- 
ated from Jordan High School in May of 1935, and married Grace Pihl on 
20 December 1941. The marriage was later solemnized in the Salt Lake Temple, 
23 March 1943. He was an Elder in the Church at the tine of his death. 

They had three children: Darlene, born 21 November 1942; a son, Terry, 
born 28 May 1946; and Colette, born 2 October 1950. 



Gerald was a Veteran of World 
War II, attached to the Air Force, 
from 1942 to 1944. He contracted 
"Valley Fever" while stationed in 
Lamoore, California, while repair- 
ing airplane radios, and was later 
released on a medical discharge. 
He was a proud member of the Dis- 
abled American Veterans (D.A.V. ) 
for over thirty years. 

Gerald 



Gerald, Grace and Darlene 





Returning to Salt Lake City, 
Gerald had extensive training in 
carpet repair, surging and seaming. 
He was considered an expert in his 
field, working for Murray B. Marsh 
Company and Adams Carpets. He also 
worked for Salt Lake Hardware com- 
pany. 

He always took pride in his appear- 
ance and enjoyed many varied inter- 
ests: fishing, dancing, bowling, 
T.V., and growing vegetables, which 



/3S- 



he liked to share with his neighbors. He had a beautiful singing voice 
and loved good organ music. 

Gerald died of Respiratory Failure at Murray, Utah, 20 May 1975. 

Darlene is married to Tom McRae, and they have the following children: 
Dennis, Dan, and David. 

Terry is an Electronic Technician, and is married to Diana Soderland. 
He has the following children: Lisa, David, Stephen Paul, aid a step- 
daughter, Marcia. Through "ultra sound" they have learned they will have 
another son, who is scheduled to arrive July 24, 1983 — his name will 
be Joshua. They are active members of the L.D. S. Church. 

Colette is married to Toby Morgas, with the following children: Ronnie, 
David, Denise, and Joana. 



Darlene and Terry 



Colette 





■I3L- 




Tom & Darlene Crittenden McRae 



Dan, David, Dennis McRae 




r^tf^fc. 


i "ami" i 

j 


; 5? 


Pnl^ wt^^Kj^ ■LHUm^^i _< 







Colette & Toby Morgas 
Ronnie & David 
Denise & Joana 



~/37- 



Terry & Diana Crittenden 
Stephen Paul & Marcia 




Terry's children - 1981 

Lisa - 7 years old 
David - A years old 




-/3tf- 



Gerald Crittenden - 1973 
Grandson David 



Gerald H. Crittenden 

MURRAY - Gerald Hall Crittenden, 

62, 53S7 Alpine Dr., died May ». W5, 

in a local hospital 

of respiratory 

failure. 
Born Sept . 7, 

1912, in Hoyts- 

vllle, Utah, to 
Lyman and 
Emma Hall Crit- 
tenden; married 

Grace Plhl Dec. 
20, 1941, In Salt 
Lake City; mar- 
riage later solem- 
nized In Salt Lake 
Temple; veteran 
WW 1 1 , graduate, 
Jordan High 
School, 1WS. 

Survlvlors: wife; son, Terry L. Salt 
Lake City; daughters. Mrs. Thomas 
(Darlene) McRae and Mrs. Barry 
(Colette! Perkins, both Granger; sis- 
ters, Mrs. Richard (Arlene) Porter, 
Vista, Calif:, and Mrs. Lloyd 
(Pauline) Hlnnen, Union, and Mrs. 
Edwin ' (Bessie Mae) Thomas, 

Service Monday noon at 4760 S. State 
St ; -friends call Sunday 6-8 p.m. and 
Monday one hour prior to service. 
Burial, Murray City Cemetery. 





-139- 



LUELLA HALL CRITTENDEN JUDD 

Husband: George Wallace Judd 
Children: Calvin W. Clifton C. 

Luella Hall Crittenden, daughter of Emma Spackman Hall and Lyman Critten- 
den, was born March 12, 1915, at Hoytsville, Summit County, Utah. She was 
the third child in a family of six, and was blessed by William Sargent. 

When she was five years old the family moved to Union, Utah, in March 1920. 
She attended Union grade schools for seven years and two years at Union 
Junior High. She graduated from Jordan High School in May of 1933, being 
listed on the Honor Roll. She also graduated from Primary, Religion Class 
and Junior and Senior Seminary. She was thrilled at doing baptisms for 
the dead in the Salt Lake Temple, and was a member of the Union Ward Choir. 

At the age of fourteen her Mother was called home, and it fell her res- 
ponsibility to keep house for her Father, brother and three younger sisters, 
as her older sister was to finish her nurses training as her Mother had 
requested. 

In the spring of 1932 she met George Wallace Judd, and after a year and a 
half courtship was married, October 12, 1933, in the Salt Lake Temple. 
Two wonderful sons were born to them: Calvin W. , born 4 April 1935, and 
Clifton C. , born 14 December 1944. Clifton was called home 12 April 1955. 







Wally and Luella 



■/</* 



Luella was always active with Church callings: Music Director, Secretary, 
Genealogy teacher in Sunday School, and Primary and MIA teacher and Coun- 
selor, iVard and Stake President in MIA, and was honored with the Golden 
Gleaner Award 21 February 1955. She loved the Youth and MIA, and she was 
Laurel Leader at the time of her illness. She was employed by Bullocks 
Inc., in Coalville, and formerly was a postal clerk at the U.S. Post 
Office in Coalville. 

Luella loved music and sang in duets, trios and quartets for many occasions, 
and played the violin at school functions. She was known by her family and 
friends for her kindness and understanding, being considerate, neat, depen- 
dable, and efficient in everything she did. She was well organized in her 
home as a wife, mother, in her Church activities, as well as for her 
employers. 

Her beloved husband was called home 1 September 1965 from a brain tumor. 
She passed away 4 April 1967 of cancer, in Coalville, Utah. She was sur- 
vived by her son Calvin of Hoytsville and four grandchildren: Frank, born 
27 August 1956; Wayne, born 16 January 1958; DeAnn, born 7 March 1960; 
and LuAnn, born 7 May 1961. 



Clifton and Calvin 



Luella and Wally 








-/47- 



PAULINE HALL CRITTENDEN HINNEN 

Husband: Lloyd Hinnen 

Children: Lloyd LaMar, Sharon Lee, and Adele 

Pauline Hall Crittenden, daughter of Emma Spackman Hall ai d Lyman Crit- 
tenden, was born November 12, 1917, at Hoytsville, Summit County, Utah. 
I was the fourth child of the family of six children. 

.Vhen I was three years old, we moved to Union, Utah, where we had a berry 
and fruit farm. I was eleven when my Mother passed away. Between r.y sister 
Luella and I, along with the help of the twins, Uettie and Bessie, who were 
only six, we kept house and cooked for my Father and brother, Gerald. 

I graduated from Jordan High School in 1935 and married Lloyd Hinnen on 
November 26, 1935. I worked at Remington Arms for two years, and on 
August IS, 1950, started working for Sears Roebuck, finally retiring on 
February 28, 198 2. 

I taught Primary for six years while living in Murray. I was a Relief 
Society Visiting Teacher for four years, while living in our old home in 
Union. .Vhen ny parents' estate was sold, my share included the old house, 
which held many memories. It was finally sold and torn down in 1979, as 
we moved out to Bennion, Utah. I have been a Visiting Teacher here for 
three years. 

I keep busy and find much pleasure in gardening, ceramics, sewing and 
crocheting. 



Lloyd and Pauline 





-JJ/2.- 



Our son, Lloyd LaMar, was born on May 15, 1936. He has been a Salt L* e 
Fireman for 17 years and is captain of his group. he has three sons and 
one daughter: 

Charlene, born June 13, 1958. She has a little girl, Angela, 

born June 23, 1978. 
kirk, born October 17, 1960. 
Craig, born Kovenber 15, 1963. He has a son, Brandon, born 

Novenber 14, 19S2. 
Chad, born December 21, 1966. 
Our daughter, Sharon Lee, was born August 16, 1935;. She had twin daughters 
and three other children: 
Carrie, born June 25, 1956, has a daughter Dottie, born June 2, 

1975. 
Sharrie, born June 25, 1956, has a daughter Trecia, born August 

4, 1972, and a son Gordon, born January 3, 1976. 
Kelly, bcrn February 10, 1959. 
Stacey, born January 16, 1960. 
Arlane (Laney), born March 15, 1961. 
Our daughter Adele was born September 24, 1948. She has two children: 

Danette, born Novenber 13, 1972. She rides her horse in com- 
petition shows and won first place in .Western Pleasure 
June 18, 1983. She has also won 9 ribbons in recent 
competition. 
Jaime, born September 1, 1976. 



Sharon, Adele, and LaMar 



Sharon, LeMar, and Adele 





/V3- 



LaMar 



LLOYD LAMAR HINNEN'S FAMILY 

Chad, Craig, LaMar, kirk 




Charlene Hinnen Johns 

Angela (Angie) Johns 



/yy- 




LaMar & Anna Lee 
Hinnen 

Anna Lee has worked 
as book keeper for 
Ropers for 10 years. 



Mike and Sharon Scudder 

Mike trains horses and 
travels all over with 
them. He has about 20. 




• )iS- 



SHARON HINNEN REYNOLDS SCUDDER' S FAMILY 



Sharon, Sherrie, Carrie 
Stacey, Kelley, Arlane 



APR 64 



Stacey, Carrie, Sherrie, Arlane 
Kelley 




Carrie & Archie Huette 
Dottie 



Sherrie & Doug Scott 
Trecia & Gordon 



Stacey Reynolds & 
Paul Snarr 




\ 



■wt,- 



Sharon and Laney Scudder 
1979 




Sharon has worked 
at Hill Field for 
18 years and is head 
over a warehouse. 

Arlane (Laney) is 
in her last year of 
college, training 
to be a gym teacher. 
She also runs the 
"Dancing Toes Shop" 
at Valley Fair Mall. 



Tauline Hinnen and Family 
Hall Reunion 1967 




-/V7- 



AJJELE IiINN£N BROKER'S FAMILY 




Adele & Bob Brower 
Danette age 10 
Jamie age 6 

1983 



Danette 



Jamie 





■/yff- 



BESSIE MAE HALL CRITTENDEN THOMAS 

Husband: Edwin Thomas 
Children: Gordon D. Thomas 

Bessie Mae Hall Crittenden Thomas, fifth child of Lyman and Emma Spackman 
Hall Crittenden, was born 31 May 1922 at Union, Utah, (a small town about 
ten miles south of Salt Lake City). I grew up on my parent's twenty-one 
acre farm, where my twin sister, Bettie Mae, who was born 35 minutes after 
me, shared in play and chores together. The chores I remenber most were 
herding the cows, picking a variety of berries, peaches and other fruits 
and vegetables in season, weeding, and taking the weekly washing about 
1-i miles away from our home for a lady to launder, after my Mother had 
passed away. However, this job wasn't all work, for my twin and I took 
turns riding in the little red wagon in which we hauled the laundry. 

As I grew older, my twin and I started singing duets in Church and school 
activities. .Vhen we were about thirteen, a neighbor girl friend started 
singing with us, as a trio, and since her first name started with a "B" 
also, we soon became known as "The 3 B's" whenever we sang at school, 
church or local functions. 

About January 1936 I moved, with part of our family, to the Belvadere 
Apartments in Salt Lake City, where I completed my schooling, graduating 
from .Vest High School. 

I married Edwin Thomas, who was 
in the Military Service, so we 
moved frequently, living in a 
number of states and also two 
foreign countries. My husband 
was transferred to the Philip- 
pine Islands in 1948 for one 
year. I traveled for 21 days 
on a ship to join him there. 
This move enabled me to also 
visit Guam and Hawaii. In 
1951 we moved to Moulins, 
France, for three years, 
which was an interesting tour 
of duty, as I was able to 
vacation in Paris, Germany, 
Austria, Switzerland, and 
Luxembourg. I enjoyed being 
married to a career service- 
man, as I was able to see many 
places that I otherwise would 
have never seen, and also meet 
lots of new friends. 




Ed and Bessie 



»Vhen Ed retired from the Air Force in June 1960, we settled in I'tah. 

In October of 1960 we bought a new home in Murray, Utah, where we lived 

for seventeen years. In those years I became very active in Church and 



-/</?■ 



held a number of positions in the Primary and Relief Society Organizations, 

I enjoyed working with the children in Primary, but I think my most re- 
warding work was in Relief Society for eleven years in the South Cotton- 
wood 6th .Vard, where I was Secretary, Second Counselor, First Counselor, 
and Homenaking Family Health Teacher in that span of time. One of the 
most hunbling and thrilling experiences of my life came when I was one 
of nine sisters from our Ward, along with other people in our Stake, and 

II other Stakes, asked to sing as a choir for the Annual General Relief 
Society Conference, October 2, 1974, and the Semi-Annual General Confer- 
ence (afternoon session) on October 4, 1974, in the Salt Lake Tabernacle. 
This will always be remembered as a cherished opportunity for me. 

In 1977 my husband retired, for the second time, from his job at the Salt 
Lake Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank, and we started doing a lot of 
trailering. In July we decided to sell our home and move to ai nny Cali- 
fornia, where we could be near our children. .Ve moved into a new mobile 
home in Apple Valley, California, and since then have enjoyed a leisurely 
life. <ie travel around for about four months out of the year in our 30 
foot 5th wheel Ideal Trailer, and never tire of traveling and seeing new 
places and meeting interesting people. 

I reeret to say I had four baby daughters, each of them stillborn, which 
were born between 1943 and 1956. However, I am blessed with one living 
son, Gordon D. Thomas, born 29 October 1940. 



Bessie and Gordon 



Gordon 





■ISO 



Gordon married Carol Marie Aukland in Spokane, Washington, 20 January 1962. 
From that union we are blessed with three lovely granddaughters. 

Susan Marie was born 18 June 1963. She is Assistant Manager of McDonald's 
fast food restaurant in Victorville, California, and also a part time 
college student. She enjoys playing her clarinet, backpacking, and bow- 
ling in her spare time. 

Patricia Ann was born 11 October 1965. She has just graduated from 
high school and has been accented into the Bio-Medical progran at L'niver- 
city of California - Riverside. Her hobbies are backpacking, bowling and 
racket ball. She played the flute in the school band. 

Brenda Reni was born 8 March 1967. She performs with a Jazz Dance Group 
in high school. She enjoys backpacking, hiking, bowling and reading. 
She also does a lot of baby sitting at the present time. 

They all live just seven miles from us, so this enables us to share precious 
times together. I am blessed with good health, for which I am most grateful. 
I enjoy a variety of hobbies, some of which are bowling, making a variety 
of handcrafts, knitting, crocheting, traveling and trailering. 



Susan, 1'atricia, and Brenda 
1982 




/&' 



BETTIE MAE HALL CRITTENDEN ESKELSEN 



Husband: Kermit Reid Eskelsen 



Bettie Mae Hall Crittenden was born 31 May 1922 at Union, Utah, the sixth 
child of Emma Spackman Hall and Lyman Crittenden. Her childhood and school- 
ing were primarily the same as her twin sister's (Bessie Mae). 

She married Kermit Reid Eskelsen 15 January 1943. Before her marriage she 
worked at Remington Arms Plant in Salt Lake City. She enjoyed music, art, 
sports, and was meticulous in her home and personal appearance. 

She became ill while in San Francisco with her husband, and passed away 
13 October 1944 at Union, Utah. She was endowed and sealed to Kermit in 
the Salt Lake Temple on 6 February 1950. 



Bettie and Bessie 



Bettie and Kermit 





-t5J.< 



Bettie and Kermit 




-153- 




CHAPTER V 

ALMA SPACKMAN HALL 

Wife 
Zina Johnson 

Children 

Joseph Alma 
Emerson Johnson 
Ella 



/SV- 



ALMA SPACKMAN HALL 



My Father, Alma Spademan Hall, was born October 6, 1885, to Emma Spackman 
and John Hall in Salt Lake City, Utah. He was the 5th child in a family 
df 12. I never knew much about my Father, only what my Mother told me, 
along with letters from Aunt Florence and my Father's journal, which he 
wrote while he was on his mission. 

On the evening of June 29, 1906, while he and his friend, D. H. Clayton, 
Jr. were cutting the lawn around the meeting house, Bishop Lewis M. Cannon 
came and shook hands with them and asked them how they would like to go on 
a mission. They told him that they were too young, but he told them to 
think it over and that he would talk to them later. Well, on Sunday, July 
8, he again asked them where they would like to go on their missions, as 
he wanted to send in their names the next day. They told him to send them 
where the Lord wanted them to go. 

On July 12 he received a letter from the First Presidency of the Church 
asking him to make arrangements to sail from San Francisco on September 11, 
1906, to fill a mission to Tahiti, where his brother Ed was already serving, 
.Vhen he returned home from work, he read the letter to his dear parents, 
and very few words were spoken that evening. His father told him that he 
would help, and told him to accept thecall. About one week later he de- 
cided the answer would be "no", because of finances. That night he had a 
dream that President Smith 
came to him and told him 
that if he would go and fill 
a mission and while abroad 
try to do his duty 
that he would not want 
for a thing, and the way 
would be clear before him. 
Before he went to work 
that morning he answered 
the call and told them 
that he would go. All 
the money he had was 
nine and a half dollars, 
but he was sure it would 
increase and it surely 
did. 



Alma' s mission 
picture 




)6S~ 



On Sunday, September 2, he had his farewell at Church. He spent the last 
week at home helping his Father haul his grain and getting things ready to 
leave. Ke left on September ?, 1906, and told his parents, brothers and 
sisters goodbye. He arrived in San Francisco on September 10. He said 
that they walked around the ruins of San Francisco .where the big earthquake 
had hit in the spring of that year. He said it was one of the weirdest 
sights he had ever seen. He left San Francisco on Tuesday, September 11, 
1906, on the Mariposa, a large white steamer which weighed 3,200 tons. 

On Sunday, September 23, 1906, he arrived at Papeete, Tahiti, where his 
brother Ed, who was mission president, his wife Sarah and their 5 week 
old baby boy were there to meet them. He said in his journal that on 
Sunday, September 30, he and his brother £d and Sarah walked to Fratana 
to their Church meetings. Three meetings were held that day, and he didn't 
understand a word that was said. On Saturday, November 3, he spent the 
morning studying and cleaning, and about one p.m. he and Hd and Sarah went 
for their first swim together. They took a little lunch and had a great 
time. 

My Father was a traveling salesman for Cragun Brothers in Ogden, a farmer, 
and a baker, and he worked very hard. He was a very special Father, even 
though I didn't know him very well, as I was very young when he died. My 
Aunt Florence has been very special to all of us, as she has told us many 
things about our fathers that we didn't know, and for this we are very 
grateful. 

Aunt Florence told me that my 
Father brought some things 
home from Tahiti and that he 
and Aunt Josephine dressed 
up in thecostumes and sang 
songs in the old Cannon Ward. 
She also told me that when my 
Father was young he and Grand- 
father Hall would go into the 
canyon and cut their Christmas 
tree, and Grandmother would 
make them take along a yard 
stick to measure the tree. 
She told them to be sure to 
leave room for their six 
inch angel to adorn the top 
branches. She also told 
about them going skating on 
the ice pond on the farm 
that Grandfather had rented. 



Alma 



and 



Josephine 




J 61*- 



On Halloween they would cut tall corn stalks and make a ten to twelve 
foot long tee-pee for the children to walk through, and that the older 
ones had to stoop down to go through it. Many children in the neighbor- 
hood joined them for the fun. Grandfather and Grandmother were at the ei d 
of the tee-pee to frighten them as they came out of it. They always had 
large bowls of popcorn and apples, and even the adults joined with them for 
the fun they had. They had two big walnut trees, and the nuts that came 
from them filled a big wash tub. They would march around it with a little 
salt sack, and my father stood there with a little stick to tap their 
hands if they took more than one at a time. 

They also put sleigh bells on the horses and put a lot of straw in the 
wagon, covered it with a quilt, and Grandmother and Grandfather brought 
out blankets from the house. My Father drove them around to the neighbors 
to take them on long rides. They would sing songs and would stay out for 
one or two hours. Grandmother would always have hot chocolate and popcorn 
for then upon their return. Grandfather would not let the boys put sleigh 
bells on the horses when they went to Church, however. She said that my 
Father kept the horses' coats shiny by using the curry comb and brush, and 
she said he was very good with animals. Aunt Florence said that they had 
a very happy childhood. I thought it was something special when she said 
that there were never any cross words spoken in their home. 




IS7- 



My Father married Zina Johnson on October 2, 1912, in the Salt Lake Tenple, 
and to their union was born three children: Joseph Alma, born June 13, 
1913, in Salt Lake City; Emerson Johnson, born January 14, 1915, in Salt 
Lake City; and Ella born April 19, 1919, in Smithfield, Utah. 



Alma and Zina 



Ella, Emerson, Joseph 




Alma and Zina 
after their 
marriage 



-1 5%- 



My .Mother, Zina Johnson, was born February 25, 1888, to Marion Moroni 
Johnson and Ellen Beardall at Springville, Utah. She was the 3rd child in 
a family of five. Sheworked in Deal Brothers Store in Springville. Her 
parents died when she was 7 years old, so she and her sister and brother 
all lived together. They raised each other, as they didn't want to be 
separated, and their grandparents would come over to see if everything 
was going all right. Their oldest sister had married, and then their 
little brother Francis had died when he was only three years old. They 
had a very hard time, as there wasn't much money, but they all got along 
well all through the years. They lived like the United Order. All I can 
say is that there was lots of love in our family and that everyone worked 
together. 



Zina Hall 



Zina, Alma, Emerson, Joseph 




Ella 




Joseph & Emerson 




l&- 



My Father was the first Fire Chief in Smithf ield, Utah; he worked in the 
Smithfield Bakery, along with his brother-in-law, my Uncle Levi U. Phil- 
lips; and he also did farming with my Uncle Joe Johnson. I can remember 
that my Father used to swing us, as we had large walnut trees with big 
swings hanging from them. He would also play hide and seek with us. 

He was fighting a big fire when he took sick, but he stayed with the fire 
until it was out. Then they rushed him to the hospital, where they dis- 
covered his appendix had broken and gangrene had set in. before he died 
he asked for a drink of buttermilk and some fig newton cookies. He died 
on December 5, 1925, in the Budge Memorial Hospital at Logan, Utah. What 
a sad day it was. Every store closed at the time of his funeral, and 
ever yone spoke well of him. His funeral was one of the largest they had 
ever had there. 

My Mother then went to w> rk in the bakery, and my Aunt Ella Phillips 
helped to raise us. Times were hard, and my Mother had to work, bless 
her dear heart. ;Ve children helped in the bakery, also. My Mother had 
the task of being both Mother and Father to us. She was very special, 
and I know that she helped us in every way doing all that she could for us. 



Alma Hall 



Alma Hall 
in Derby Hat 





-ILO- 



On July 24, 1931, my youngest brother, Emerson, went over to Amalga to be 
with his boy friend, Bud Peterson. They went swimming in the Bear River, 
but Emerson didn't know how and was drowned. He went into the water about 
one in the afternoon, and they had a deep sea diver come and go down into 
the water to find him, but without success. They finally dynamited, and 
it brought up his body the next morning at 8 a.m. It blew two holes in his 
body — it was really sad. lie was only 16 year old at the time. 

My brother Joseph got a real bad heart while running in school sports 
activities. His teacher told him if he didn't run he wouldn't pass him. 
He had not been practicing and it was just too much for him. He did a 
lot of Temple work, and he enjoyed it so much. He was asked to go on a 
mission but couldn't on account of his bad heart. He also had a ruptured 
appendix, and peritonitis had set in, so they couldn't operate on him. 
He died on October V, 1933, and was only 23 at the time of his death. 



Joseph 



Emerson 





-/£<* 



My Mother worked for Wickes Construction Company. She also did lots of 
Temple work and also lots of Genealogy work, and worked in most of the 
organizations in the Church. My Mother took sick and had to stay home. 
She had cancer of the liver, and she surely did suffer so very much with 
it, but she never complained. She was a great Mother, and I do pay respect 
to her for all she did for us, willing to give her all. She was truly a 
great and wonderful person to all who knew her. She was loved by all. 
She passed away August 2, 1945, in the Budge Memorial Hospital at Logan, 
Utah. She was truly missed by all who knew her. 

Zina Johnson Hall 




-J LI- 



ELLA HALL LARSON 



Husband: Loyal Samuel Larson 
Children: Jay Hall Larson 

Ella Hall was born April 19, 1919, at Smithfield, Utah, to Alma Spackman 
Hall and Zina Johnson Hall. I went to school in Snithfield, Utah, and in 
Richnond, Utah, and worked at Wickes Construction Company and Cornets 
Store. I have had a wonderful life but a lot of sadness in my childhood, 
losing my father at such an early age (6 years) and the loss of my two 
brothers. My mother was wonderful to me, which I do appreciate so very 
much. 

I have had many positions in the Church, such as Stake Relief Society 
President, Librarian, Primary Secretary, teacher in irimary, Sunday School, 
and Mutual. At the present time I'm a Visiting Teacher Supervisor. During 
the Fall of 1982 I started a class in oil painting, which I have enjoyed 
very much. 

On June 5, 1940, I was married to Loyal Samuel Larson in the Logan Temple. 

We have had a wonderful married life. Sam was born June 5, 1920, at Mi lie 

ville, Utah, to Alma Oscar and Mary Baker Larson. He was the seventh child 

in a family of ten. He has had 

various positions in the Church, 

also. He had to retire early 

from his job at Kennecott Copper 

Company, as he was in a bad 

wreck and had to be operated on 

to have a whole knee replacement. 

We have a wonderful son, Jay Hall 
Larson, who was born January 27, 
1948, in Salt Lake City, Utah. He 
filled a 2\ year mission for the 
L.D. S. Church in San Paulo, Brazil, 
leaving in 1967. 

He married Janice Wheelwright on 
December 19, 1969, in the Salt Lake 
Temple. To thei r union was born a 
lovely baby girl, Amy Rae Larson, 
who was born August 27, 1976, in 
Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Our families are very special to 
us. It's like they say, "Families 
are Forever". 




-Ihz- 



Ella 



Ella and cousin Mariam 




Ella in front of 
first home 




Ella, Sam, Jay 





Sam and Ella 



m 




-io3- 



Janice and Jay 
Larson 




Amy 
Larson 








V 




Amy 
Larson 





~Jb¥- 



Janice, Ella, Sam at Reunion 1967 (Hall) 
(Jay on Mission) 




George & Helen Hall, Zina Johnson 
Barbara and Ella 



Ella, Sam & Amy 




-Uf- 




CHAPTER VI 



LOUISA SPACKMAN HALL SKOG 



Husband 



John Arvid Skog 



Children 

Arvid Kent 
Emma Louisa 
Ester Doris 
Jackie Junior 



-)U- 



LOUISA SPACKiMAN HALL 

Louisa Spackman Hall was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on May 29, 18S7, 
the 6th child of Naomi Emma Spackman and John Hall. She married John Arvid 
Skog on April 12, 1919. He was a painter and decorator, and Louisa was a 
practical nurse. Their first child, John, was born on their first anniver- 
sary, dying on the same day, so they didn't celebrate their wedding anni- 
versary. A second boy, Arvid Kent, was born the next year on May 7, 1921, 
the "Kent" coming from the grandfather's area in England. 



Louisa 
The three of them sailed to Sweden 
during November and December of 
1921. Arvid had measles aboard 
ship, so the trip was a chore for 
Louisa. Upon arriving at John's 
childhood home, his new wife was 
not accepted too readily because 
of her Mormon Religion, which the 
dedicated Lutherans didn't under- 
stand. The homestead in Hessleholm, 
Sweden, had a straw thatched roof, 
with the cow and horse barn adjoin- 
ing the house living quarters, 
sharing the same heat in winter 
and the smells, also, which upset 
Louisa and young Arvid. Some of 
the different customs of the two 
countries caused friction in the 
family for years. However, love, 
thrift and hard work by both of 
them prevailed in a long and happy 
marriage and a good family life 
for their four children. 

John made several trips between 
Europe and the United States be- 
fore his marriage, working as a 
deck hand and ship's painter for 
his passage. John and a sister, 
Hulda, lived in San Diego and 
Coronado in 1914. She worked as 
a maid in private homes and John 
as a gardener and painter at the 
Del Coronado Hotel. They went 

to San Francisco on 1915. John worked for a painting and decorating com- 
pany that did all the fancy trim on the ceilings and walls of the plush 
theaters, with the dome in gold leaf and hand stenciled flowers and designs. 

An accident disabled John when a Model T. Ford's parking brake gave out and 
ran over him while he was going up a hill on a motorcycle. It practically 
tore his leg off, losing all the flesh on the inner side of his leg. It 




-)L>7- 



healed in about a year and only bothered him when he got very tired. Years 
later he was again painting on high scaffolds and following a team plowing 
on his farm, with no limping on his partial leg. When he moved back to 
Salt Lake City his old employer took him back and let him work in the shop 
mixing paints and caring for equipment. John tired of inside work and 
tried his hand on the railroad track gang, working in the Truckee, Cali- 
fornia, and Nevada areas. 

John was drafted in October of 
1917, but was released at Fort 
Lewis, Washington, because of his 
bad leg. Upon returning to Salt 
Lake City he was drafted again to 
train at Port Douglas, Utah, and 
then released. He was again 
drafted in the spring of 1918 and 
was sent to Virginia to help take 
care of the burying of the many 
service men and civilians dying 
of influenza there. He described 
it as a dirty, stinking calamity, 
a twenty-four hour a day job, with 
little rest and continual rain. 
This epidemic of 1918 caused a 
half million deaths in the United 
States and affected the entire 
world. 

Louisa had taken nursing training 
at Holy Cross Hospital in Salt Lake 
City and worked some at Saint f^arks 
Hospital and in private homes. She 
made a trip with a prominent family 
to their Pasadena, California, home 
for the winter of 1917, taking care 
of the elderly couple. 

After living in a furnished apart- 
ment for a couple of years, they 
boucht a house at 2863 South 7th 
East, Salt Lake City. They had an 
apple orchard and kept a milk cow. 
Louisa took care of a few chickens 
and raised a vegetable and flower 
garden. Two girls were born while 
they lived there: Emma Louisa, 
born 27 November 1923, and Ester 
Doris born 17 August 1926. 




Louisa graduating from 
Nurses' Training 



This house was traded in 1929 as part payment on a farm about 5 miles west 
at 1501 West Claybourne on the west side of the Jordan River, just 2 miles 
south of where Louisa was raised. John continued to paint, and he farmed 
the 30 acres every way he could, raising sugar beets, grains, sheep, horses, 



)&$- 



and, at one time, 14 milk cows. Louisa raised rabbits and chickens and 
her gardens, selling the products to the neighbors and canning lots of 
everything for winter. 

Their home on 
Jackie Junior was born 22 December 1931 at home. Claybourne Avenue 
The Doctor was present, but it war a very trying 
time for Louisa, since the house wasn't modern. 
She carried water from an outside artesian well 
and heated it on a wood stove to wash clothes 
with a washboard. 

Farming was a nightmare the first few years, 

because the farm had been put together from 

small lots sold during the 1926 land boom. 

Probably 100 owners had been foreclosed on 

for mortgages and taxes. Big concrete markers 

had been put in at the corners, 1 by 1 foot 

and 2 feet into the ground. John broke plows 

and harnesses when these were plowed into. The two years before John got 

the farm, some Greek bootleggers had the place. They had stored their 

whiskey in underground rooms, 10 by 10 feet, with heavy planking and a 

foot of dirt over that. As the planks rotted, the horses and cows would 

fall into the holes. Some had to be butchered because of broken legs 

and hips. 




John and Louisa 
about 1953 



There was a large sand pit on 
the property with a good even 
grade of plastering sand. Much 
of this in past years had been 
hauled with team and wagon the 
10 miles to Salt Lake City for 
new buildings. John bought a 
dump truck in 1933 to haul coal 
from Evanston, Wyoming, and Price, 
Utah, to supplement his cash in- 
come, since no painting was being 
done during the depression. 
Louisa's brother Oscar and his 
brother-in-law, George Rollo, 
were also hauling coal and timber 
from Kamas and Price and would 
stay at Louisa and John's home 
between trips. 



John and Louisa were open and 
friendly to all, and many times 
let hobos stay in the barn, 
trading a week or month's board 
and room for work on the farm. 
This lasted for about four years during the depression. John didn't ever 
join the Mormon Church, but he had many friends among the officers of the 




IL?~ 



Church. The firm he worked for painted many of the Church buildings, and 
so he was able to secure a contract for sand to repair the wall around the 
Temple grounds and for some of the new office buildings during 1934 and 
1938. 

The home was modernized when rural electrification came in 1934. This 
surely helped with chores and made life easier, giving better lights for 
school work, having a radio, andwater pumped into the house. As teens, 
the two boys milked cows before school and helped on the farm. 

John gave up farming and started to contract painting post offices and 
telephone relay buildings with his brother Eric. Louisa still wo rked long 
hours gardening and doing crocheting for a hobby. She had many pen pals, 
and through them collected 1000 pairs of salt end pepper shakers, which 
the granddaughters now have. 

Their daughter Louisa married Stirling .Vhittle in 1941 and moved from home 
for awhile. He was in the Army and was sent to Europe, so the folks had 
grandchildren living with them for awhile. Ester left home for a vacation 
in Houston in 1946 and found a Texan, Truett Schultz, to marry. She only 
came home for very short visits. John helped his son Jack move a house to 
the acreage across the street from the family home. Jack was married to 
Jane Potter right after high school and stayed in the area working for 
American Smelters. John and Louisa helped all the children get started 
out over the rough spots in life. 




11 January 1972 

Arvid K.ent Skog 
Ester Doris Skog Schultz 
Emma Louisa Skog .Vhittle 
Jack Skog 



- J 70- 



Louisa and John started to travel by car to visit their scattered children 
and Louisa's oldest brother, John Hall, who had moved to Seattle. When her 
husband couldn't get away from his jobs, Louisa traveled alone to California 
and Seattle. 

John passed away at 77 on November 21, 1967. Louisa then sold the house to 
move to a smaller one close to Jack in Granger, Utah. Jack and his family 
helned with her garden and shopping until she couldn't get around. In 1971 
she moved to a rest home for the last year of her life. She passed away 
on January 8, 1972, at the age of 84. They are both buried at .test Jordan 
Cemetery in Midvale, Utah. 




Louisa 

and 
John Skog 

1965 



Louise H. Skog 

GRANGER — Louise Spackn 
Hall Skog, 84, of 
Granger, died 
Jan. 8. 1972 in a 
Granger nursing 
home of natural 
causes. 

Born May 29. 
1837 in Salt Lake 
Citv to John and 
Emma Spackman 
Hall. Married 
John A. Skoq 
April 12, 1917 in 
Sail Lake Citv 
He died Nov 21. 
1967 Member 
LDS church; 
worked at LDS 
hospital as practi- 
cal nun?. 

Survivors: sons, 
cl.-LQhters; Arvid K., National City. 
Calif i Jack J , Granger; Mrs. Leroy 
(Louise) Jones, Portland, Ore.; Mrs. 
Pru°tt (Ester) Schultz, Houston, 
To , 22 grandchildren; five great - 
qiandchiloren; sisters; Mrs. Ella 
Wide, Coalville; Mrs. Florence Mil- 
ler, Palm Springs, Calif.; Mrs. 
Edwin (Mable) Oison, Lake Wales, 

Funeral Tuesday noon at 4330 S. 
Redwood Road where friends call 
Monday 6-8 p.m. and Tuesday one 
hour prior to services. Burial West 
Jordan Cemetery. 




-ni- 



ARVID KENT SKOG 

Wife: Ruth Lorene Wilson 

Children: Miriam Loette, Cynthia Ann, Karen Ruth, Donnavere 
Dee, Pamela Irene, Ester Louisa, and Arvilla Kay 

Arvid Kent Skog was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on Kay 7, 1921, to 
Louisa Spackman Hall and John Arvid Skog, their first surviving son. 

He was a boy scout and won a trip to Yellowstone Park in 1937. He cane 
down with rheumatic fever on the return trip and spent the rest of the 
summer in the hospital. The doctors did all they could and sent him home, 
but he kept losing weight and apparently was worse. His mother would carry 
him outside for sunbaths and, remembering some old home remedies using 
herb teas, she had his father gather wild sage to give the boy baths. They 
soaked his legs in the sage solution for hours, as well as giving him com- 
plete body baths. He finally recovered and started school again. His 
feet were weak, so in 1939 he had them operated on, causing him to miss a 
half year of school. 

When he graduated from Granite High School, instead of going to the Agri- 
cultural College to become a Veterinarian as planned, he took aptitude 
tests and in 1941 went to Burbank, California, to work for Lockheed Air- 
craft Company. Arvid was called for the draft, but because of his foot 
operation and being in defense work, he was excused. 

Arvid lived with his Uncle John and Aunt Ida Hall for six months in Kent, 
Washington. While there he chopped huge piles of wood for them and helped 
make shake shingles to repair the barn roof, he also painted the inside 
of their cupboards a bright Chinese red while they were away. 

Arvid met Ruth Lorene Wilson in Burbank, California, in September of 1942, 
while working for Lockheed Aircraft. She was working at -American Airlines, 
and they ate at the same restaurant. They both left the area -- Ruth moved 
to Fontana, California, and Arvid went to work in Spokane, Washington, 
qfter having a vacation in Salt Lake City with his folks. The two of them 
corresponded for 5 years, while Arvid traveled all the western states work- 
ing for various aircraft companies. He was on his way to a new job in 
California when he decided to visit Ruth in March of 1947. They were 
married on June 8, 1947. 

Ruth was the daughter of Thurlow Wilson and Hazel Irene Parks Wilson. 
She was born in Elm Hall, Michigan, on July 2, 1922. She had one older 
brother, Carlyle, and one younger sister, Donnavere Wilson Derrick, who 
lives in the old Wilson home in Fontana, California. 

Arvid got a civil service job at Norton Air Force Base in San Bernardino, 
California, after trving the hardware business. Over the years seven 
girls were born to them: 

Miriam Loette, born June 1, 1948. She married Kurt William Endler on 

July 13, 196S. One girl, Angela, was born September 1, 1969; 
she drowned on September 6, 1974. They were divorced in 1976. 



\7Z- 



Cynthia Ann, born September 23, 
14, 1969, a navy man 

Karen Ruth, born July 25, 1953. 
23, 1972. They have 
28, 1973, and Jennife 

Donnavere Dee, born September 1, 
months, after having 
learned sign language 
Jesus Christ of Latte 
adopted. 

Pamela Irene, born November 27, 
November 20, 1977, bu 

Ester Louisa, born March 3, 1959 
of 1976, and was divo 

Arvilla Kay, born December 18, 1 
fortune at the age of 
mento, California, 



1951. She married Steven McN'abb on June 
that she knew in school. 

She married Steven Disler on September 
two daughters, Christina, born December 
r, born June 19, 1975. 

1955. She became deaf at the age of four 
spinal meningitis, so the family all 
. She was baptized into the Church of 
r-day Saints when the new policy was 

1956. She married Frank Lockwood on 
t was divorced on April 6, 1982. 
. She married James Hiland in January 
reed in 1980. 

961, has just left home to seek her 
21. She is working as a clerk in Sacra- 



All three divorced girls have taken back their maiden names. Arvid was 
a scoutmaster for several years, but quit when he had an all girl family. 




Karen Ruth 

Donnavere Dee 
Pamela Irene 

Cynthia Ann 
Miriam Loette 

Arvid and Ruth 
Arvilla Kay 

Ester Louisa 



nz- 



Ruth was secretary of the MIA (Mutual Improvement Association) of the 
Fontana, California, ward of the L.D. S. Church, and Arvid was secretary 
of the Young Men MIA for two years, 1948 and 1949. 

In 1963 a change of pace developed for the family whsi Arvid was sent on 
temporary duty in the midwest to modify ballistic missile sites. After 
school was out for the summer, Ruth moved the seven girls by train to 
Topeka, Kansas, so the family could be together for the next year. This 
was quite an experience for them. 

Still working under civil service, Arvid was assigned as Quality Control 
to Navy programs for missiles and some of the Appolo moon equipment and 
deep sea exploration devices. The family was moved to San Diego, which 
made a big change in their lives, because three of the girls became wives 
of Navy men. 

Arvid retired in 1979 and is trying to organize and keep up with his and 
the fanily's hobbies of stamp collecting, rock collecting, 6 old cars 
and license plate collecting. He and Ruth attend many meetings of clubs 
concerned with these hobbies in 1983. 



Arvid & Ruth's Wedding 
June 8, 1948 




Ruth 

Arvid 

Karen 

Miriam 

Cynthia 



/ 7V~ 



1981 
Steve and Karen Disler 
Jennifer and Christina 



i 


^^/MMM 1 ft k.*r ■■ W 



Jennifer and Christine 




-}7S- 



January 1972 
iojth & arvid 
Don Hall 
.Ella & Sam Larson 



July 1966 

Dick .Vilde 
Donald Kail 
Arvid Skog 




Arvid Skog and Family at Hall Reunion in 1967 




- )1L- 



EMMA LOUISA SKOG WHITTLE JOKES 

Iiusbands: Stirling Nordquist .\fhittle and Leroy Jones 
Children: Esther Louisa, Stirling Litellus, Verner Arvid, David 
John, Janice Irene, Jack Kenneth, and Mary Jame 

I was born November 26, 1923, at the St. Marks Hospital in Salt Lake City, 
Utah, at 10:12 p.m. I was the 4th child born to Louisa Spackman Hall Skog 
and John Arvid Skog. One boy they did not name, as far as I know, was born 
6 years before I was, but he only lived a few days. John Skog was born 
4i years before I was and lived about 2 weeks. Arvid Kent Skog was born 
2\ years before me and is still alive. Ester Doris Skog was born about 2\ 
years after I was. Jackie Junior Skog was born when I was about 7 years 
old. I was baptized into the L.D. S. Church when I was 12 years old, in 
Granger, Utah. 

Our address at the time I was born was at 1008 East 27th South. It was 
across from the Nibley Park Golf course in Salt Lake City. I can remember 
we had a cow and chickens there — it was country land then. The street 
car ran in front of the house down the middle of the street. We lived 
there until I was about 2-J years old. Then in February of 1925 we moved 
out in the country on to a 40 acre farm at 1501 West Claybourne Avenue. It 
was known then as the Chesterfield area, and we drove out Redwood Road to 
get there. Ester was just 6 months old when we moved out on the farm. 

I remember the first day and night I sp^nt on the farm. There was not 
much furniture in yet, just clothing and dishes and matresses. The only 
ones who stayed there that night were Arvid, Dad and I, and Uncle Oscar, 
who was Aunt Hazel's husband. Dad made Arvid and I a bed in a cast iron 
bath tub they had moved there to go into the house. We had dry corn flakes 
for breakfast, asthey had forgotten the milk. Arvid and I didn't care, be- 
cause we were camping out, so Dad said. Mother and Aunt Hazel came the 
next day, along with the rest of the furniture, a cow, and some chickens. 

I don't remember anything too much for the next few years until I started 
school. I remember Mother planting gardens, both vegetables and flowers. 
That's when she started all her beautiful roses. 

Dad had a dump truck he used to haul sand from the sand pits on the place. 
It looked so big to me then, but was only a small 5 yard bed truck. The 
sand was beautiful and white — riverbottom sand they called it. The 
Jordan River ran past the bottom of the farm to the East, and on the North 
side ran Decker's drain, which ran from Decker's lake a mile west of us 
down into the Jordan River. Farmers canal ran through the property from 
the South to the North. We swam in all of them most of the years we were 
all at home. 

Dad used a horse hitched to a scoop scraper, which he guided by hand, to 
dig out the sand. I remember sitting on the banks of the pits watching 
him take up the sand. He loaded it by hand on to the truck until he got 
the pits deep enough to drive the truck under a bank and put it in with the 
scoop. The University of Utah, on the east bench of Salt Lake City, is 



177- 



built from the sand from Dad's sand pits, as well as some of the capitol 
buildings and a lot of the older buildings in Salt Lake City. They wanted 
Dad's sand because there was no trash in it, and it was so pretty and white. 

We went ice skating on Decker's Lake until we started leaving home. My 
first pair of skates were double bladed with wooden shoe plates that Dad 
had brought from Sweden, where they went after Arvid was born. 

Emma Louisa Skog kittle 
Age 2\ 



I 





;T*r wo / iMfc fl ;-. S-t6a*f W^7 / "Mi- •£- *?<*■ 2-/ 



-I7S- 



We raised most of our own food. I remember hoeing sugar beets — both 
thinning the fields and hoeing out weeds. The fields were about a block 
long, and we were naid 15<; per row. We would get 8 to 10 rows thinned or 
weeded each day. rt e thought we were so rich on pay day at the end of the 
week. We would buy a nickel bag of candy once a month. The rest we saved 
and used for Christmas and birthday presents, also Fathers and Mothers 
Day presents, we usually made about $5.00 each during the whole growing 
season. Since we were 6 to 10 years old, that was a fortune to us. Dad 
only grew sugar beets 2 years. He had leased the land from some one else, 
and the fellow sold the land which was used to build 7 houses. Our farm 
set back up Claybourne Avenue, 2 blocks east of Redwood Road. 

Dad was gone quite a bit on painting jobs. Sometimes in the summer we 
went with him, if it was in the state of Utah. We would camp out for a 
week or two while he did his painting. Nights and week ends we got a 
nature lesson from Dad on how to survive and how to enjoy the beautiful 
country we visited. Then the depression hit, and he painted closer to home, 
when he could get jobs. 

Mother and we children worked the farm most of the time, but Dad always 
did the spring plowing. It was done with 2 horses hitched to a hand plow. 
Mother and we kids cut the seed potatoes and planted them as he opened the 
rows with the plow. We grew potatoes, watermelons, cantaloupe, beans, 
tomatoes, corn, red beets, eggplant, onions and many other vegetables. We 
even grew our own pop corn. 

During the depression Dad hauled food around Salt Lake City for the welfare 
people. He was naid $50.00 a month, plus tie gas for his truck. We lived 
well because of the vegetables we raised. We also raised our own meat — 
cows, nigs, chickens, and rabbits, and a turkey for Thanksgiving. Twice 
a month Dad took the dump truck and scrubbed the bed of it with homemade 
lye-soap and water. Then he put a clean white canvas inside the bed of the 
truck and went to some bakeries in town and picked up the old stale breads, 
cakes, donuts, sweet rolls, etc. Then he covered them with another clean 
canvas. When he got home all the neighbors came, and everyone picked out 
the good wrapped ones. We all took some home to eat, and the rest was fed 
to the pigs and chickens. 

Mother made soap, as everyone else did in those days. It was my chore to 
stir it and help her pour it into a large tray to cure. Then We cut it up 
into bars for washing, bathing and dishes. We also made our own breads, 
cheese, butter, and clothing. We canned everything and made our own jams 
and homemade rootbeer. Boy, was that good on a hot summer day! J We had a 
cooler box built around the well outside, where all our butter, rootbeer 
and milk were cooled. The water was ice cold year round. We didn't have 
water in the house until I was about 10 years old, then Dad had it plumbed 
into the kitchen. I remember taking a bath on Saturday nights in a round 
No. 3 wash tub in the winter, and in the summer in the cast iron tub in the 
back yard summer house. This was a framed work house, screened on four 
sides to make it cool. We dropped the canvas walls down when we bathed in 
there. We had a wood cook stove in there, also, so we could cook there in 
the summer time and do our canning. We had a wood cook stove in the kitchen 
inside the house, also, for winter cooking and for heat. 



17 9- 



One of my fondest memories of Dad was every morning he built a fire in the 
kitchen stove, then nut on a pot of coffee, and all the while he was sing- 
ing a song of some kind. The ones he sang were: "Spring Time in the 
Rockies," "Back Home in Utah", "Hallelujah, I'm a Bum", or "J've Been 
Working on the Railroad," Sometimes he sang "Let Me Call You Sweetheart" 
and some Swedish love song. I never could understand the words, as I 
didn't learn Swedish. No matter how bad things were going he could 
still sing and laugh. 

I was a real "torn boy" — hated house work all my life. I would rather be 
outside working in the garden or teasing my 2 brothers and sister, or 
taking care of the animals. But, since I was the oldest girl I had to do 
a lot of the house work anyway. 

Mother was ill a lot, but she never ever let us children go hungry or 
without clean clothing or her love. I couldn't understand then why she 
had me do so much for her around the house. Later, when they told me how 
ill she had been, I understood. 

We all went to Church on Sundays, had ricnics in the summer, went camping 
in the Wasatch Mountains east of town, boating and swimming on Great Salt 
Lake, and we went to Saltair park once or twice a year. We went to the 
Plymouth Elementary school out on 48th South and Redwood Road. I graduated 
from the 9th grade there with high grades, and then went to Granite high 
School for 2 years. We walked or rode a buggy to school for 3 years, and 
rode on a sleigh pulled by a horse in the winter. .Vhen they finally got 
a bus, we walked or ran, if late, 2 blocks down to Redwood Road to catch 
the bus. I remember a couple of winters when the snow was 3 and 4 feet 
deep. We would walk on top of the snow, as it was frozen. When it started 
to melt we would sink to our waists in the snow, until Dad could get the 
scraper out and clear the road. 

■Every Halloween we and all the neighbor kids would dress up for "trick or 
treat". Then everyone came back to our place. We would pile tumble weeds 
and other weeds into a huge stack as high as the house. We put potatoes 
and corn in the husks underneath the pile and set it on fire. We also 
toasted weiners and marshmallows over the hot coals when the fire burned 
down. By then the corn and potatoes were baked. Adults and all were there 
for this feast every year until I was about 12 years old. The ladies made 
hot chocolate for everyone. If the weather was wet, we had a chili feed 
and hot chocolate in the house. There were 6 to 10 families that joined 
us every year. 

Sometimes on winter Saturday nights or on birthdays we had the neighbors 
in for a "get together". We played sit down guessing games. One was called 
"Butcher Butcher". In the summer and fall we played "Run, Sheep, Run" or 
"Hide and Seek", or went swimming in the sand pits. It seems that after 
everyone in the neighborhood got into their teens, we quit doing a lot of 
those things. 

We used an "out house" and took baths in the wash tub until I was about 
15 years old. Then Dad built a bath room in the house. He used to take 
us to Strawberry Lake and Utah Lake on camping and fishing trips. 



I%d- 



I married Stirling Nordquist Whittle on September 2, 1942, while he was 
in the army. We lived on his pay of $30.00 a month for about 6 months. 
Then the army started giving soldiers' wives $50.00 for living expenses. 
We bought an 18 foot trailer house and lived in Jordan, Utah, for 3 months; 
then they sent him to camp Adair, near Salem, Oregon. I joined him H ere, 
and we stayed with his sister until we found an apartment of our own in 
Salem, Oregon. .Ve were there 8 months, then down to Camp Hyder in the 
desert of Arizona. That was the first Christmas I had ever spent without 
snow. We were there until February of 1944; then to Colorado Springs, 
Colorado, for 2 months. Then they sent him over seas to Germany. I went 
home, as I was pregnant with my first child. I had 7 children by Stirling 
and lost 5 by miscarriages. 



Kmma Louisa and husband, Stirling Nordquist Whittle 

1946 




■Hi 



Louisa's Children 

Esther Louisa Whittle Nebenfuhr Blizalda was born August 27, 1944, in Salt 
Lake City, Utah, She married Floyd Gerald Nebenfuhr, November 25, 1967, 
in Seattle, Washington, and was divorced September 15, 1976, in California. 
She married David Gregory Elizalda on April 21, 1979, in Stanton, California. 
Her children: Lucinda Louise Nebenfuhr, born May 16, 1968, in Seattle, 

Washington. 
Jason Arvid Nebenfuhr, born July 21, 1969, Seattle, Washington, 
Jon Christian Floyd Nebenfuhr, born December 20, 1972, Orange, 
California. 

Stirling Utellus (Larry) Whittle Skora was born November 10, 1946, in Salt 
Lake City, Utah, and was adopted out when two years old. He served in the 
Air Force in Viet Nam War. 

Verner Arvid Whittle was born October 20, 1947, in Tacoma, Washington. He 
served in the United States Air Force in Germany. lie married Paula Sue 
McElroy on January 27, 1973, in Seattle, Washington, and was divorced on 
February 2, 1979, in Seattle, Washington. 

His children: Jenny Lynn Whittle, born July 14, 1975, Seattle, Washington. 
James William Arvid Whittle, born December 5, 1976, in 
Seattle, Washington. 

David John Whittle Douphtery, born September 13, 1948, in Tacoma, Washington, 
and was adopted out at 6 months. 

Janice Irene Whittle Douphtery was born August 22, 1949, in Arlington, Cali- 
fornia, and was adopted out at 2 months. 

Jack Kenneth Whittle was born May 12, 1951, in Orange, California. He was 
married to Frances Darlene Strong in Panama City, Florida, while he was in 
the U.S. Air Force. Darlene is from Seattle, Washington. 

Their children: Paul Kenneth Whittle, born February 24, 1973, Panama City, 

Florida. 
Carrie Francine Whittle, born July 24, 1974, Panama City, 

Florida. 
Andrea Marie 'Whittle, born September 13, 1979, Portland, 

Oregon. 
They all live in Vancouver, Washington. 

Mary Jane Whittle was born December 16, 1953, in Orange, California. She 
is not married and does not plan on getting married. She is looking for a 
man like my Dad was. She supports herself, and just last fall took a trip 
to England and Ireland for 4 weeks, 

Verner' s ex-wife kidnapped his 2 children, and he will have to take her to 
court to get then back. 



-ifz- 



Lucinda Louise 
1982 

(Cindy) 



Esther Whittle Elizalda 
1983 





fe 



133- 



Jason Arvid — 193 2 



Jason -- 1977 




Jon Christian Floyd -- 1982 



-/£V- 



Verner Arvid Whittle - 1979 
Jenny Lynn 
James William Arvid 




Jenny Lynn Whittle 
James uVilliam Whittle 
1981 




Verner and Paula Sue 

Jenny Lynn 

1975 




■its- 



Frances Darline, Jack Kenneth Whittle 
Carie Francine, Paul Kenneth 
1978 




Paul, Carie, Andrea 
Great, Grent Grandfather 



Andrea — 1981 





B>U 


P"-" ri 










■ B* .- 


V 


f\r ^ 


^ 






-/&- 



Mary Jane Whittle 
198 2 



Mary Jane Whittle 
1982 







Carie and Paul Whittle 
Children of Jack Kenneth 








J *» 



-/$>- 



ESTER DORIS SKOG SCHULTZ 

Husband: Truett Clark Schultz 

Children: Melody Suzanne, Daniel Truett, David Clark, 
Maureen Doris, kathy Jean, and Trudy kayleen 

I was born on August 17, 1926, in Salt Lake City, Utah, to Louisa Spack- 
nan Hall and John Arvid Skog, their third child. While working as a long 
distance operator for the Telephone Company, my girl friend and I received 
permission from our parents to visit her relatives in Houston, Texas, on 
our vacation. We discovered that our $27.50 a week salary didn't last 
long, so we went to work for the Telephone Company there, instead of asking 
our parents for the train fare back home. Through friends there I met 
Truett Schultz, and six months later I went home, but returned soon to be 
married on July 3, 1946. 

Truett served almost six years in the Second Division of the Army aid re- 
ceived a purple heart for action in World iVar II in Germany. He was shot 
in the legs, and even after 35 years the shrapnel has not all wo rked out 
nor the sores healed completely, which causes him to limp now. He has 
served in the various offices of the local chapter of the Veterans of 
Foreign Wars, and is now president of the local chapter in Spring, Texas. 

Truett cane from a family of 15 children, who were all very close. His 
Mother had six children, but died in 1926 when he was three years old. 
Twelve years later his Daddy rennrried and had nine more children. They 
lived in the country and did logging and farming for a living. They also 
took care of other children who didn't have any 'lace to go. They went to 
school in a one room school house, and the teacher sometimes boarded at 
their hone. 




Danny, Maureen, Melody, David 
Kathy, Truett, Ester, Trudy 
1981 



•m~ 



I kept working at the Telephone Company until my first baby was born, and 
then I stayed home and haven't worked out since. The whole family like 
hunting, fishing and camping out, so we have had lots of good times together. 

My husband worked in the oil fields for 12 years or so. Then he and his 
brother started their own exterminating business, which he had for 20 years. 
Later he sold his part to his son Danny, and then worked part time. We 
lived in Houston until ten years ago, when we moved to Srring, a small rail- 
road town about 27 miles north of Houston, where Truett was raised with his 
family. We have been married 37 years and have six children and nine 
grandchildren. 

Melody Suzanne, born August 30, 1949, married John Lommose Aldridge. They 
have 2 boys, Jessie (14) and Tommy (9). 

Daniel Truett, born January 1, 1952, married Judy Doyle. They have 
Kristofer (7) and Rachel (3). 

David Clark, born September 18, 1954, married Lottie Woodson. They have 
Holly (5) and Dusty (1). 

Maureen Doris, born August 26, 1957, married Carl Cade. They have one 
son, Joshua Cade (1). 

Lathy Jean, born March 30, 1959. They have April Donnell (4) and Tammy (2). 

Trudy Layleen, 12 year old, born February 19, 1971. 

My husband Truett Clark Schultz was born November 11, 1923. 



-/£?- 



JACKIE JUNIOR SKOG 

Wife: Jane Potter 

Children: Roy Allen, Jacqualin Jane, Ronnie J. , Pattie, 
and Shane. 

Jackie Junior Skog, the fourth child of Louisa Spackman Hall and John 
Arvid Skog, was born December 22, 1931, at home in Chesterfield in Salt 
Lake County, Utah. 

He married Jane Potter as soon as they graduated from high School. He 
started working for American Smelters, where he stayed his whole working 
life. 

They have five children: 

Roy Allen, born May 17, 1951. He married Barbara Shaw, and 
they have two children: Amy Lynn born in 1975, 
and Jeffrey Allen born in 1979. 

Jacqualin Jane, born April 28, 1952. She married Rob Barney, 
and they have 3 children: Steven Jason born 1971, 
Kammie born 1975, and David born 1978. 

Ronnie J., born July 6, 1956. He married Peggie Barney and 
they have 2 children: Cody born 1979, and Shanna 
born 19S2. 

Pattie, born February 18, 1958. She married Rick Earl, and they 
have 4 children: Michelle born 1975, Michael born 
1978, Crissy born 1981, and Brent Patrick Claude 
born April 18, 1983. 

Shane, born June 14, 1966. 




Rob Barney, 
(Jacqualin' s husband ) 
Jacqualin 
Jack 
Patty 
Jane 
Ronnie 
Shane 
Roy 

August 1970 



■l?o- 




CHAPTER VII 



ELLA SPACKMAN HALL WILDE 



Husband 



Willard Ileber Wilde 



Children 

Virginia Ella 
Richard Heber 
Josephine 
Judith 



ill' 



ELLA SPACKMAN HALL WILDE 
(Written by her daughter Judy) 

Ella Spackman Hall was born April 26, 1889, to John and Naomi Emma Spack- 
nan Hall, and was one of the 12 children they had. My Grandpa had a small 
farm, and everyone in the family worked very hard to make things go. Mom 
used to tell us how Grandpa dredged the river bottoms for gravel and sand, 
and how they would ride out in the water while he was doing the dredging. 

She told us how they would get up real early in the mornings, around 
4 a.m., to get the vegetables ready to take to market to sell. She said 
her hands would get so cold they would be about frozen off. She told me 
how her Mom made clothes over for them, and how Gmndpa bought any shoes 
that were on sale and how sometimes they hurt when they would wear them, 
because they didn't fit just right. 



I remember her telling me about 
their Christmases, and how one 
Christmas she and Grandma and 
Grandpa went into town in the 
buggy. 'When they went into the 
store, the lady gave Mom a little 
doll which she really treasured, 
as they didn't get much for 
Christmas. Mom went out in the 
buggy to wait for then, and when 
Grandna came out and saw the doll 
he told Mom that Grandma needed 
things worse than Mom needed a 
doll, so he took it back into 
the store and traded it for 
thread and other sewing things 
that Grandma could use. This 
has always hurt me, but I am sure 
Grandpa had to do most anything 
to keep things going. Also, I 
am sure it hurt my Mom, but she 
always said that Grandpa was 
only thinking of Grandma. 

Mom always taught us to "Waste 
not, .Vant not", and I am sure it is 
because she grew up not having 
much. Mom only went to the 8th 
grade in school, but she was a 
practical nurse, and even after 
she was married she went out 
nursing trying to help with the 
family income. 



Ella 




Mom married my Dad, Villard Heber Wilde, on June 21, 1916, in the Salt 
Lake Temnle, when she was 27 years old. I Think I had the most wonderful 



I 92s 



parents in the world. Dad was born April 13, 1888, to Frederick and 
Jemima Clark Wilde, -v'hen they v;ere first married they moved to Cumber- 
land, Wyoming, where Virginia, my oldest sister, was born. 




Heber 
and 
Ella 



Mom didn't have much, even after she was married. She told how they used 
boxes for furniture for awhile. They lived right below the hill, and when 
the coal miners got drunk, they would roll their empty beer kegs down the 
hill, and they would clank into the house. I think the only real furniture 
they had at that time was a bed, stove, and table. 

They later moved to Coalville, and it took about 2 days with the hay wagon 
and horses to make the trip. I remember torn telling me how she snuggled 
Virginia close to her at night to keep her warm. In Coalville Dad worked 



1 93 



with his team at Grass Creek Coal Mine, and he and worn also did the book 
work. Mom also did practical nursing, as it was extremely hard times. D a d 
was night watchman on the railroad during World ,Var II, working on the 
stretch of tracks between Devil Slide and Morgan. He took their dog Jounce 
along to keep him company. He went to the tf.Y.U. for awhile, and later he 
bought Grandpa .Vilde's farm. They had to split the cream pay checks, and 
one time when the check was only 42^, they each got 21<j. 

Four years after Virginia was born my brother Dick was born; 5 years later 
my sister Josephine was born; and then four years after that I was born, 
so Virginia and I were 13 years apart. 

Dick, Judy, Virginia (Josephine had died) 
Heber and Ella 




Mom was really an excellent seamstress, and she made clothes over for us 
kids. Sometimes I couldn't understand why I couldn't have a new piece of 
percale for a dress, but later on I surely did understand. We had lots of 
soup to eat and not too many desserts. I liked to go over to my Aunt 
Dolls, for she always had desserts, and I surely did like them. However, 
when the General Authorities of the Church came out, when Dad was Stake 
President, Mom surely put on a good meal, plus we always had the best china 



/yy- 



on the table along with Mom's silverware. i>he always had her white linen 
table cloth on, also. I will never forget those things. 

I remember one Christmas Mom was sewing like mad, and when I asked her 
what she was doing she said she was just helping Santa. The next morning 
there was a pretty new duster. Mom also made the best fudge, divinity and 
other home made candy anyone could make, and she always made some for 
Christmas. Mom liked to play cards with me and my sister Josephine, when 
she had the time and when we had no lessons for school. 

rt'hen my brother, Dick, went into the Army during iVorld .Var II, my Mom 
helped Dad milk the cows for a counle of years, and then I took over the 
job. I had many good talks with my Dad while we milked the cows. Mom 
had a heart of gold, and although she snoke her niece, she surely had a 
heart for everyone. I remember when Aunt Josephine died and wasn't sealed 
to anyone, Mom had my Dad go and be sealed to her in the Temnle. 

Mom was 41 years old when I was born, and I always remember she had a hard 
time getting around, because she was so crippled with arthritis. In 1956 
we took Mom and Dad back east to visit my sister Josephine, and we also 
took then on trips to California and Canada, which they surely did enjoy. 



A family Christmas Party 




-I9S- 



Dad fell and broke his hip in his later years, and Mom and we children did 
the best we could to take care of him. He died July 29, 1966, at the age 
of 78. He had been a Bishop for 5 years, on the High Council, and Summit 
Stake President for 7 years. At the time of his death he was the Summit 
Stake Patriarch. He also filled a mission in the Midwest. 

Mom also had many positions in the various organizations of the Church, 
including the Stake Trimary Board. In her last years she snent 4 years over 
in the Heber Hospital in the long term care center, since she needed con- 
stant care. She died on October 29, 1974, at the age of 84. I will always 
remember Mom for her love, her hard work, and her famous saying, ,r iv'aste not, 
Want not", which I really believe. I had the best Mom and Dad in the world, 
and hope to live so that someday I will see and be with them again. 



Ella and Heber 
with two great 
grandchildren, 
David and 

Anetta 




Arvid, Ella, Judy 
Betty and Son 
Louise Skog 



- /?£- 



Hall Reunion 1967 
Ella Wilde and her family 




Louise Skog and Ella Wilde 




v : 



-I17- 



Ella H. Wilde 

COALVILLE — Ella Spackman Hatl 
Wilde, gs. died after a long illness Oct. 
59. 1974. in a 
Wasatch County 
hospital. 

Born April 26. 
1889. Salt Lake 
City, to John and 
Emma Spackman 
Hall. Married Wll- 
lard Heber Wilde 
June 21, 1916, Salt 
Lake LDS Tem- 
ple. He died July 
29. 1966. Former 
practical nurse. 

Survivors: son, « 
daughters.;.** 
Richard H . US 
Mountain Green, * ^ 

Morgan County; Mrs. Angus (Vir- 
ginia) Pace, Wanshlp, Summit Coun- 
ty; Mrs. Charles (Josephine) Knowi- 
ton, Ashland. Ohio; Mrs. Sheldon 
(Judy) Crittenden, Coalville; 14 
grandchildren; 20 great- 
grandchlldren; sisters, Mrs. Ted 
(Mabel) Olsen. Lake Wales. Fla.; 
Mrs. Florence Miller, Palm Deseret, 
Calif 

Funeral Saturday 1 p.m., Coafvllle 
LDS Stake Center. Friends call 
Walker Mortuary, Coalville, Friday 
7-9 p.m., Saturday 11 a.m.-12:» p.m. 
Burial, Coalville Cemetery. 





W. HEBER WILDE 
Funeral Tuesday 

Prominent 
Coalville 
Man Dies 





COALVILLE - W. Heber 
Wilde, former Coalville council- 
man and Summit County church 
leader, died Friday in Salt Lake 
City of natural causes. He was 
78. 

He was born April 13, 1888, a 
son of Frederick and Jemima 
Clark Wilde. He was married to 
Ella Spackman Hall June 21, 
1916, in the Salt Lake LDS Tem- 
ple. 

He served a mission in the 
Northern States from 1910 to 
1912 and had been a bishop's 
counselor and held the office of 
bis-hop in Coalville Ward for five 
years. 

He had served as the counse- 
lor in the stake presidency for 
.-.. veral years and was president 
of the Summit Stake for seven 
years. 

STAKE PATRIARCH 

At the time of his death, he 
was the Summit Stake patriarch 
and a temple worker. 

He had served as a member 
of the Coalville City Council. 

After his marriage, he resid- 
ed for two years in Cumber- 
land, Wyo., and then moved to 
Coalville where he had been a 
farmer. 

Surviving are his widow, one 
son, three daughters; Richard 
H Wilde and Mrs. Sheldon (Ju- 
dith) Crittenden, both of Coal- 
ville; Mrs. Angus (Virginia) 
Pace, Wanship, Mrs. Charles 
(Josephine) Knowlton, Nova, 
'/hio; 14 grandchildren; six 
great-grandchildren; one broth- 
er: Joseph E. Wilde, Coalville. 

Funeral services will be Tues- 
day at 1 p.m. in the Summit 
Stake House with Bishop Robert 
M Walker conducting. 

Friends may call at the Walk- 
er Mortuary in Coalville Mon- 
day from 7 to 9 p.m. and Tues- 
day prior to services. Burial will 
be in the Coalville Cemetery. 



I 



■I9t- 



Husband: 
Children: 



VIRGINIA WILDE PACE 
(Written by her sister Judy) 

Angus Tree Pace 
Marlene, Gale, and Kathryn 



Virginia Wilde was born April 22, 1917, in Cumberland, Wyoming, the first 
child of Willard Ileber and Ella Spackman Hall Wilde. She is just 13 years 
older than I am. 

She served as vice-president of the student body at North Summit High 
School, and was active in drama and the band, graduating in 1935. She 
also attended one year at Weber College. 

She married Angus Pace on March 29, 1936, in the Salt Lake Temple, when I 
was just six years old. They had 4 children, 3 of whom are still living. 
Marlene, their oldest child, married Keith Dlonquist, and they have 2 
children, who are both married. Then they had a son that died a few hours 
after birth. One year later she gave birth to another son, Gale. He an d 
his wife, Kathleen, had 5 children. Then years later Virginia had kathryn, 
who married Norman Staples, and they had 3 children; so Virginia would 
have 10 grandchildren, 

Virginia worked hard in the Church and held several different positions 
in all of the organisations. She served as President of the Relief Society 
and Primary and was secretary of the Coalville Stake Relief Society. She 
was also a member of the Wanshir Daughters of the Utah Pioneers. 

Virginia and Angus with Family 



© 





i| 



m • 



}??■ 



I used to love to go up to her home in the summer for a vacation, as I 
didn't have a grandma or grandpa to visit. Virginia had the sweetest 
disposition I have ever seen — she never ever said anything bad about 
anyone. She was just a real sweet person, and I loved her very much. 
iVe surely did have some good visits and many a good talk together. iVhen 
Mon was over in the Heber Hospital, Virginia and I used to go at least 
twice a week to visit, and we surely became close to one another then. 

Virginia got cancer and died within 7 months after knowing of it. She 
was to have been operated on, but was so full of the radium they had 
treated her with, that they had to wait 2 weeks. In that 2 weeks it spread 
so fast through her lungs and all her body they just gave her chemo- 
therapy. It was in the latter part of September when they found her cancer 
and treated her, and she was to be operated on in December, but she died 
on A^ril 19, 1976. She was loved by all. Since then Angus has remarried 
and still lives in the same house. 



Virginia, Angus, 

Marlene and Kathryn 
1966 



Kathryn Staples 

Marlene Blonquist 
May 1981 





ZfiA- 



Marlene and Keith Blonquist with family 

■ 




fl T 




Marlene 's Grandchildren 
Jerimiah and Jessica 
Blonquist - 1982 



Gale and Kathleen Pace 

and Family 





-JLOf 



Judy and Virginia 




Virginia Wilde Pace 




WANSHIP - Virginia Wilde 
Pace, 58, Warship, died April 16 at 
her home Born April 22, 1917, 
Cumberland, Wvo., to Willard 
Heber Ella Spackman Wilde. 
Married Angus Pace, March 29, 
1934, Salt Cake LDS Temple 
Served as vice president of the 
student bodv, for North Summit 
High School. Active in drama and 
Band, graduating in 1915 One year 
at Weber College Served as past 
president of the Relief Society and 
Primary Had taught in all the 
organizations. Past secretary of 
the Coalville Stake Relief Society 
Member of the Wanship DUP 
Survivors: husband, Wanship; son 
and daughers, Mrs. Keith 
(Marlene) Blomouist, Coalville; 
Gale W. Pace, Wanship; Mrs 
Norman (Kathryn) Stables, North 
Salt Lake. 7 grandchildren; 
brothers and sisters. Richard 
Wilde, Mountain Green; Mrs. 
Sheldon (Judith) Crittenden, 
Coalville; Mrs. Charles 

(Josephine! Knowtton, Ashland. 
Ohio. Puneral services will be 
conducted Wednesday at 12 30 
pm In the Wanship Ward Chapel. 
Friends may call at the Walker 
Mortuary. Coalville. Tuesday 7-9 
p m and Wednesday 1 :30 a.m. 

until noon Burial In the Wanship 
cemetery. 



-2.02.- 



RICHARD HEBER WILDE 
(Written by his sister Judy) 

Wives: Elizabeth Irene Rollins and Wilda Birch 
Children: Glenn Richard and Douglas D. 

Richard Heber Wilde was born on February 17, 1921, the only son of Willard 
Heber and Ella Spackman Hall Wilde. He is a dear brother with a heart of 
gold, and would help anyone in need. He has a very likable disposition. 

He worked hard, going to work in the coal nines, on the state roads, on 
the farm, and the Ideal Cement Company. He went into the service during 
World War II. He played basketball and all sports and was "allstate" on 
the basketball team. 

Dick married Elizabeth Irene Rollins, and they were the parents of 2 boys: 
Glenn Richard and Douglas D. They have 6 grandchildren. Doug and his 
wife, Robin, have 2 children. Glenn and his wife, Ann, have 4 children. 

Dick was later divorced, and he married Wilda Birch, He is now retired, 
and they spend their winters in St. George, Utah. 



Hall Reunion 1967 

Back row: Betty, Dick, Ella Wilde, Angus, Virginia, Judy, and 

Sheldon 
Front row: Kathryn, Brent, Bob, Doug, and Diane 




3LD3- 



.Vilda and Dick 

1978 



Judy and Dick 
1981 




Dick and his Mother 



Robin and Doug Wilde 
Briana and Ryan 





2.0¥- 



JOSEPHINE WILDE KNOWLTON 
(Written by her sister Judy) 

Husband: Charles Arthur Knowlton 
Children: James, Evelyn, and Jeanette 

Josephine was born on February 5, 1926, to Ella Spackman Hall and w'illard 
Heber .v'ilde, the third child in the family. She had many trials in her 
life, which included two operations for her appendix. She was always a 
very quiet but real sweet little gal. 

She graduated from North Summit High School in May of 1944 and then went 
to work at Clearfield Naval Supply Depot. There she met Charles Arthur 
Knowlton (from Ohio), who was in the Navy and stationed at Clearfield. 
They were married October 18, 1945, and had 3 children born to them: 
James Charles, born June 14, 1946, in New London, Ohio; Evelyn Marie, 
born January 31, 1948, in Lorain, Ohio; and Jeanette LaVon, born on 
December 30, 1952, in New London, Ohio. They also have 9 grandchildren. 

Josenhine died in A^ril, 1978, in Ashland, Ohio. At the time of her death 
she was a teacher in Relief Society, teaching the Social Relations Lesson. 
As I said, she had many trials in her life, sickness, operations, poor 
health, and not very many of the good things in life. I used to sew and 
make dresses for her, which she surely appreciated. 

Josephine was a very kind, considerate person and was always one to give 
to the unfortunate, even if she didn't have it to give. She loved her 
family very much, and they surely loved her. 



Josephine — 1970 




■a.o&~ 



Jim knowl ton's graduation picture 




Evelyn knowlton's junior picture 



Jeanette knowlton's 6th grade 
picture 





•20b- 



Jim Knowlton, Josephine's husband 
Mabel and Charles Knowlton (son) 



Rex and cvelyn 3ogner (daughter) 
Jiir. Knowlton 




Jeanette (daughter) and Gary Baker 



Josephine's Grandchildren 
April 1978 




-ZD7 



JUDITH WILDE CRITTENDEN 

Husband: Sheldon Crittenden 

Children: Kenneth, David, Joan, Brent, Bob, and Diane 

I was born April 28, 1930, in Coalville, Utah, the last child in our family, 
I guess I had more than the rest when I was growing up, but I still re- 
member Mom still making over clothes for me when I was in high school. 

I graduated from North Summit High School, worked during the summer for 
D. Frank Rees, the dentist, and in the fall went to Utah State University 
at Logan, Utah. I married Sheldon Crittenden in the Salt Lake Temple on 
February 16, 1949, so I only attended college for two quarters. 

We are the parents of 6 children, 4 boys and 2 girls, all still living: 
Kenneth, David, Joan, Brent, Bob, and Diane. They are all married except 
Diane, who just graduated from high school in May, 1982. .v'e have 12 
grandchildren. 



Bob on Mission, i'uerto Rico 



Judy, Sheldon and Family 1981 




Back Row: Brent, Ken, 
and Dave 

Front Row: Diane, Joan, 
and Bob 



-2.6t 



I have worked in several different Church positions, fron Relief Society- 
President to Primary President. I have taught about all the Primary classes, 
as well as the Laurels and 3ehives in Mutual. I have also taught all the 
classes in Relief Society but Cultural Refinement. <e lived in Roy for 3 
years, where I was irimary President of the Second .Vard. The Church has 
surely taught me a lot, and it has given ne more confidence in myself. 

I have had 4 major operations in the last 11 years, one being breast cancer. 
At the present time I an fine. I have always been at home while the kids 
were growing up, but during the last 5 years I have worked for Deseret 
federal Savings and Loan Company here in Coalville. 

I have a real super family, and I love then with all my heart. I have had 
3 sons go on missions: one to the French lielgium Mission, one to Japan, 
and one to Puerto Rico. Two of my sons, Ken and Dave, have graduated 
from the Jrigham Young University, and Dave also received his Masters 
Degree from the University of Utah. Brent will graduate from the Univer- 
sity of Utah this fall of 1983, and 3ob is also attending the University 
of Utah now. My daughter Joan graduated from Trade Tech with a certificate 
in secretarial wrk, Diane nlans to attend Trade Tech this spring semester. 
All the children have married in the Temple, although ken, the oldest, has 
had problems in his life and has been divorced. He is remarried now. vv'e 
are a very close family, and would do anything for one another. .Ve also 
enjoy lots of family get-togethers. 



Sheldon and Judy 



Planing Gorge Trip 1978 




3.0?- 



At the present tine I an a substitute teacher in the Primary, a Visiting 
Teacher, and since Sheldon was just put in as ward Temple Leader, we will 
be attending the Temple regularly. Again I say I love my family and my 
husband with all my heart — they are my greatest joy. I had the best Mom 
and Dad in the world, and although we didn't have much, my Mom surely did 
teach ne a lot. Her motto was "»»aste not, .slant not", and this I truly 
believe and have lived, .ie were a happy family. 

I love the Lord and the Church with all my heart, and I know without a 
doubt that God hears and answers prayers, for he has answered many of 
mine. Sometimes, however, we are told "No", but God knows what is best. 



10 of the 12 
Grandchildren 



Judy, Sheldon 
and Family 

1981 
(Bob on Mission) 




-Z/D- 



Ken, Dave, Bob, Brent - 1976 



Summer - 1978 




Judy and Grandchildren 
1979 




-111- 



1979 
Joan's little girl Michelle 
Ken's little boy Steven 




Judy, Sheldon and Family - 1966 





2.iz. 




CHAPTER VIII 



JOSEPHINE SPACKMAN liALL PAYNE 



Husband 



Frank M. Payne 



JZ/3- 



JOSEPHINS SPACKMAN HALL PAYNE 

Josephine Spackraan Hall (Josie) was born on August 25, 1891, in the 
Farmers .V'ard in Salt Lake City, the Sth child of John and Emma Spackman 
Hall. She was baptized on her 8th birthday, August 25, 1S99, and parti- 
cipated in the many family and Church activities, along with her other 
brothers and sisters. 

She had a lovely soprano voice and did a lot of singing for various activi. 
ties, as well as Church programs. She took vocal lessons from a German 
music teacher and sang with a band at Liberty Park in Salt Lake City. She 
could sing in Italian and Hawaiian. Arlene Crittenden Porter still has 
some of her music she gave her when she and Grandma went to North Carolina, 



Josephine by the 

Mulberry Bush 



Josephine 





•2.)H- 



Josephine painted china professionally at .Valker 3rothers Department 
Store in Salt Lake City, up on a balcony overlooking the store. Arlene 
has a large vase of hers that was cracked from a windstorm; Pauline has a 
water pitcher and a set of china with an initial and gold band that Jo- 
sephine had painted for their mother; and Bessie has a candy dish, also 
painted by Josephine. Arlene said she enjoyed watching her paint, when- 
ever she had the chance. Pauline remembers going with her mother to 
Josephine's studio in Walkers Brothers Store to watch the Charles A. Lind- 
berg parade from her high window overlooking the street. 

Josephine helped move Grandpa and Grandma from the old ranch house in the 
bend of the Jordan River to the Highland Park Ward in about 1920. Arlene 
recalls how much she loved that old house in the Cannon Vard, with its 
flowing well and large mulberry bush, and where we all enjoyed the family 
reunions. Grandpa died while they were living there in the Highland Park 
Ward, December 8, 1923, and Josephine cared for Grandma for the remaining 
years of her life. 

Josephine took Grandma with her when she moved to North Carolina to work 
in a new business. Grandma died there on January 6, 1936, so she brought 
her back to Salt Lake City for burial. Shortly thereafter she went to 
Hawaii to work, while her sister Florence and family lived there. 



She married Frank N. Payne on January 26, 1939, and was sealed to him on 
July 19, 1964. Josephine di ed of a hemorrhage on November 31, 1940, 
while she was still living in Hawaii. 



Josephine — 1916 
at the family hone 
by the Jordan River 




Josephine 
A friend 
Florence 




-2/. 



'1 






CHAPTER IX 



OSCAR SPACKKAN HALL 



Wife 



Hazel Rollo 



Children 

DeEtt 

J. Rollo 



■2.1b- 



OSCAR SPACEMAN HALL 
(Written by DeEtt Hall Winterton) 

Oscar Spackman Hall was born on April 26, 1893, in Salt Lake City, Utah, 
to John and Naomi Emma Spackman Hall. He was baptized and confirmed by 
his Father on April 26, 1901. 

Since I was just 5 year old when my Father died, I don't remember much about 
him. He was known to have been a wonderful man, always ready to help those 
in need. He was nicknamed "Doc Oscar" when he was a young boy, because he 
doctored all the sick animals until they were well. He had long curly hair 
(see picture below), and when he was about eight years old his father cut 
the curls and gave them to his sister Florence. She kept them for years, 
and her daughter finally made doll wigs from them. Father was a born 
mechanic; he was always fixing cars and was very good with his hands. He 
made a pump from old parts, when his Mother needed one. Father also taught 
the other kids how to ice skate, because they all said that he was the best 
skater around. 



Oscar 



and his 

Father 




-2.17- 



When Father was twenty-three years old, he married Hazel Rollo on March22, 
1916, in the Salt Lake Temple. They were married by Joseph F. Smith, Jr. 
About six years later they began their family. They had three children: 
Rollo, born March 11, 1922; Max born October 20, 1925 and only lived 3 days; 
DeEtt, born March 16, 1927. 

In their years of marriage they lived in Riverdale, the state of Washington, 
Huntsville, and Salt Lake City. .vhen they were first married, as far as I 
know, my Father and Mother lived in Riverdale and worked for the Barlow's. 
This gave Father a wage and helped pay for the furniture he bought from 
Barlow's Furniture Store. 



Oscar 



and 



Hazel 




-XIX- 



My Father was in the service in Washington at Fort Lewis. It is presumed 
he joined because of the first world war. While in vVashington there was a 
problem, because Mother looked so young (and the service men were not al- 
lowed to date anyone who was not of age). When they went to the movies or 
to town they were arrested by the M.P.'s. Finally, after being arrested 
so many times, and because Mother was of age and they were married, they 
issued a special arm band to let the M.F.'s know that it was all right for 
them to be out together. Sometime while there Father had an operation, 
and shortly after he was released from the service. 



Hazel and Oscar 



Oscar 




-£/? 



In about 1921 they moved to Huntsville, Utah, where they wo rked on a ranch 
owned by the Harding family. Mother cooked the meals for the ranch hands, 
and Father managed the ranch. At this time Father was also known as a 
trader. He was said to have been the best worker, and even when he went 
trading during the day, if he hadn't finished the work before he went, no 
matter what time it was when he returned, he would make sure the work was 
finished. 



Oscar 









'Vhile in Huntsville he 
helped ^lant nine trees 
around what is now known 
as Huntsville Park. He 
would carry a bucket of 
water to every tree every 
day, so they would grow. 
They did grow and are 
beautiful now. 

They moved to Salt Lake 
City and worked for Aunt 
Lucy Smith (my grandmother's 
sister). Father worked 
managing her farm and rais- 
ing farm animals. A short 
time later Father died from 
burns he suffered in a fire. 
This was on May 4, 193 2. 



Mother was born August 22, 189 4 

in Huntsville, Utah, to Peter 

Francis Rollo and Mary Alice 

•Voods. She was the sixth of 

seven children, having four 

brothers and two sisters. 

Mother was sick quite a lot 

when she was a little girl. 

She had pneumonia several times, 

and the doctors were very 

worried about her and said 

that if she got pneumonia 

again she could die. She 

got sick again, and her 

Mother (my grandmother) 

would make a poultice from cow manure every hour, and they said that is 

what saved her life. The doctors said she also had rheumatic fever. 

Mother graduated from school when she was in the 8th grade. She won a 
spelling bee contest and received a book for winning. She was told she 
was the best speller and reader in her class. To earn money she worked for 
several prople in Huntsville doing housework and cooking meals. 




*^3 



2.2.0- 



Mother loved to dance, and one time when she and her friend were walking 
home from a dance in the winter when it was snowing, they looked down the 
road and thought they saw a man just standing there. They were scared, 
so scared they didn't know * at to do. After talking it over they decided 
to pray, and Mother said by the time they would get there he would be gone, 
or if not they would be protected. After praying they went on, but the man 
never moved. This went on for awhile, but the man was still there, and 
they didn't know vh at they were going to do. They kept on going, and when 
they got to him they noticed it wasn't a man -- it was a jx>st covered with 
snow. They were relieved to find that out, but they said that praying 
gave them the courage to go on. 

Before Mother met Dad she was engaged to someone else, but there were a few 
problems to be ironed out, so she went to helr> her Aunt Lucy, who was due 
to have her baby anytime, and stayed there to help her. rtfhile she was 
there she met Dad and decided that he was the one for her and broke off 
the engagement to the other nan. She and Dad went together for awhile 
and then married. Mother had three children and many miscarriages. After 
Dad died Mother moved back to Huntsville and lived with her mother and 
traveled to Ogden to work, working for nroninent r eople. Later she moved 
to Ogden and lived on 12th Street, then on 2Sth Street, until I was in 
the sixth grade. .Vhen gmndfather became sick we moved and lived with 
them on Iowa Street in Ogden, and Mother looked after him. 



Hazel, Rollo, and DeBtt 




-2.2.1 



DeHtt and Rollo 




-JL2-2-- 



Mother had a stroke in 1950 and I stayed with her in Ogden; then in 1959 
we noved to Roy, Utah. Mother died on the 25th of April, 1965, in Ogden, 
Utah. 

Mother was always so busy taking care of her family and working trying to 
make ends meet after Dad died, that many experiences in her life ar.c! much 
of her life was not told. There were a few times, however, that we would 
sit together before going to bed and she told us these things. SometiF.es 
she would also tell us ghost stories, which we loved to hear. 



Hazel R. Hall 

ROY-Mrs. Hazel Rollo Hall, 70, of 5574 

i. 2100 W., died Sunday night at the Dee 

Hospital after a stroke. . 

Mrs. Hall was born Aug. 22, 1894, in 

Huntsville, a daugh- 

ter of D eter Francis 

and Mary Woods Rollo. 

She lived in Hunts- 
ville until 1929, ; alt 

lake Jty one year, 

Ogden 30 years and 

in Roy the past six _ 

years. 

On March 22, 1916, : 

she was married to ■ 

Oscar Spackman Hall 

m the Salt Lake LOS 

Temple. He died May, 

8, '932, in Salt Lake | 

City. 

She had been a ! 

saleswoman for F. W. ! 

Woolworth Co. She 
was a member of the Roy LOS Fourth Ward 
and had been a Relief Society, Sirday 
School, theology and Primary leacher and 
ward chorister. She was a member ot 
Daughters of the Valley. 

Surviving are one son, J. Rollo Hall, 
Ogden; one daughter, Mrs. Norman (DeEtt) 
Winterton, Roy; 11 grandchildren, one bro- 
ther George P. Rollo, and one sister, Mrs. 
Isaac (Mary) Smith, both of Kamas, Utah. 

Funeral services will be held ihursday 
at 11 a.m. at Lindquist and Sons Colonial 
Chapel with Bishop Ivan J. Bambrough of 
Ihe Roy Fourth Ward officiating. Friends 
may call at the mortuary Wednesday from 
7 to 9 p.m. and Thursday prior to services. 
Buria.' in Hnutsville Cemetery. 




XZS 



J. ROLLO HALL 
(Written by his sister, DeBtt Hall Winterton) 

Wives: Betty Porter and Pearl Elwood 

Children: Gary, LaNaun, Jeanine, Nadine, Maxine, Daryl, 
and Roxanne 

J. Rollo Hall was born on the 11th of March, 1922, in Ogden, Utah, to 
Oscar Snackman Hall and Hazel Rollo. He was the oldest of three children. 
He was a very protective big brother and always took care of his sister 
constantly. Wherever Rollo was, there was his baby sister. We shared the 
housework on Saturdays. Rollo loved to tease, but no matter how much he 
did, he always showed me that he loved me by taking care of me when Mother 
wasn't there. 

Like his Father, Rollo was very good with his hands and liked to build. 
He also liked to collect lizzards and keep them in shoe boxes under his 
bed, as my Mother found out one day. Rollo loved football and was on the 
school team, but because he did not keep his graces up in school, they 
told him he could no longer play on the team. 

Rollo had a hard time through his life, not having a Father around. He 
would play truant, and the truant officer said all he needed was a man, 
a father image to help him construct his energy. The officer tried to 
help the best way he could and bought Rollo some wood to make a bookcase 
for him. He did a beautiful job, and to this day that truant officer 
still has the bookcase. 

After this Rollo got work on a milk route, delivering milk all over Ogden. 
He would get up early in the morning, deliver the milk, come home and rest 
for awhile and then go to school. After school he would go to the bowl ing 
alley on 23rd Street and set un pins for three alleys, working there until 
late at night. He was the only one who could ever set up three alleys 
at one time. Rollo worked very hard as a young boy, and in his teens he 
also worked on a farm. 

In 1942 Rollo married Betty Porter, on the 6th of February in Ogden, Utah. 
They had two children, Gary and LaNaun. Gary served a mission in Texas 
and was married in the Temple. LaNaun was also married in the Temple. 
Later Betty and Rollo were divorced. 

In 1951 Rollo married Pearl Blwood, on the 4th of November in Washington 
Terrace, Onden. They had five children: Jeanine, Nadine, Maxine, Daryl, 
and Roxanne. 

Rollo' s son Gary recalled the following experiences: "During the hunting 
season of 1958, Dad and I and a friend of Dad's went hunting in the area 
that Dad called Cottonwood Canyon. We went up on a Friday, the night be- 
fore the hunt. Dad had a big army tent that would sleep about 10 men. 
It was big enough to even have a stove in it, but we didn't have a stove 
for it. We used a portable barbecue pit to cook our supper on. We then 



-22.4- 



used the heat from the coals to heat the tent during the night. In the 
middle of the night Dad's friend got up and accidentally knocked the pit 
over and started the floor of the tent on fire. >Ve hurried and put out 
the fire, and later found out that we could have died from the poison 
gas of the coals. 

"The opening morning of the hunt we were sitting watching for deer, when I 
heard a noise behind me. I looked around and saw a doe and a fawn. I 
tried to call to Dad, but the deer heard me and took off. Later in the day 
Dad shot his deer. 

"The next day I had to be to Church to give a talk. So Dad drove me down 
to the end of the canyon, where his wife, Pearl, picked me up and took me 
home. On the way back up the canyon to their camp, they saw a Bob Cat by 
some sheep corrals. Dad got out of his truck and shot the Bob Cat. He 
had it skinned and mounted and gave it to me before he died." 



Rollo Hall and Family 
Hall Reunion 1967 

Front Row: Janine, Nadine, Maxine, Roxanne, Daryl 
Back Row: Gary, David, LaNaun, i-oraine, Pearl, Rollo 




-225- 



Rollo served in the Army, joining when he was 18 years old. He cid his 
training at Fort Benning, Georgia, after which he was shipped over seas. 
He was in Patton's 3rd Army, and he went in on the 2nd wave on D-day 
invasion. Rollo was wounded several times and received a purple heart, 
oak leaves and a star. He said the only reason why he was alive is because 
he was left handed. He was on the bazooka, and the enemy always tried to 
shoot the person who was firing, and because he was left handed he always 
was the loader. 

Rollo died February 1, 1974, in Ogden, Utah. 



J. Rollo Hall 
age 19 




■3.jlU>- 




3ack Row: 

Laraine Hall 
Gary Mall 
David Hall 

i^ront Row: 

Calvin Hall 
Brady Hall 
Brandon Hall 



LaNaun Hall Swift and 
Gary Swift 

Children: Shereen, 11 years old 
Tonya, 10 years old 
Ryan, 5 years old 
Michelle, 2 years old 




-> -*> 



7 




D£ ETT HALL ,VINT£RTON 

Husband: Norman Duke Winterton 

Children: Vernon Hall, Bryce Edward, Neil Hall, Dale Norman 

I, DeEtt Hall, was born on the 16th of March 1927 in ^Jgden, Utah, the 
youngest of 3 children born to Oscar Snackman Hall and Hazel Rollo Hall. 
I was told that when I was born I was a small baby of roughly 5 pounds. 

The first thing I can remember as a young girl was sleeping upstairs at 
Grandmother Rollo' s house in Huntsville. I could hear the brook running, 
and I remember I loved to listen to that brook. It must have sent me to 
sleep every night, because the next thing I knew it was morning. 

I would help Grandmother 
sell eggs and butter to 
the people who lived in 
the summer homes across 
the Ogden river. Grand- 
mother would get in the 
boat, and I would push 
it across the river. 
Vhen we got home we 
would pet cleaned up 
and walk up the highway 
to a little store that 
sold ice cream and candy, 
and Grandmother bought 
me a treat. At this time 
my Mother was working in 
Ogden, and she would 
travel to and from there 
every day. 

I remember in the summer time I would go with Uncle John when he would plant 
or plow the fields. I would sit on the plow or mower with him and play, or 
when I was tired he would hold me in his arms and I would sleep. I had a 
carefree type of life there in Huntsville, and it was fun. I didn't have 
to do much, except for bringing in the wood and getting the water, and when 
Grandmother heard the chickens cackling she would have me go and get the 
eggs. 

When I was six years old we moved to 12th Street in Ogden, and then a 
little while later to 28th Street, I went to Lewis Elementary School, 
and was an average student at school. When I was in first grade I became 
very sick with one thing after another — measles, mumps, whooping cough, 
and bronchitis, and the doctor said maybe a heart murmur. The next summer 
I went to stay with Aunt Mary in Kamas to recuperate. 

I remember later when I got home from school I would have to make a fire 
and start supper, so when Mother got home from work it was ready. It 
was always so lonesome and cold. Since I was alone a lot after school, 



DeEtt Hall 



-Jl^-2- 



I cleaned for Mother and would never tell her I had done it. She would 
say, "There has been a good fairy here today," and I thought that was neat. 
I also at that time liked to play Movie Stars on the window sill behind 
the blind. I would dress up in Mother's clothes and let the blind roll 
up and pretend I was on a stage by dancing and singing. I always wanted 
to be a secretary, so I would play that, too. 

Christmas was hard for us, because we always got just what we needed, 
and it seemed like Santa never came. One time we asked Mother how come 
Santa never came and left toys for us. When she explained to us that there 
wasn't any Santa, we understood. There was one Christmas I wanted a doll 
real bad, and Mother got an older doll and had it fixed up just like new. 
On Christmas morning I found the doll under the tree, the most beautiful 
doll I had ever seen. It was so pretty I didn't want to play with it, so 
I took the books out of the bookcase and put her in it. 

When I was about ten years old Grandmother Rollo bought me a bike. I went 
everywhere on that bike — it was the greatest thing that happened at that 
tine. To earn money I wou]d tend children and clean houses until I was 
old enough to work at the stores. Then I went to work for Woolworths. 

•Every summer when I was a teenager, Mother had me go to Kanas to stay with 
Aunt Mary (my mother's sister) and Uncle Ike, so I wouldn't be alone so 
much. Aunt Mary was like a mother and I'ncle Ike was the father I never had, 
This was my home away from home. 

I met Norman Winterton in Kamas at a dance one summer during Fiesta time. 
After that we dated every summer, and the rest of the year we would write 
to each other, unless there was a special dance and Norman would come to 
Ogden to take me. There was one special dance I remember well, Norman's 
Junior Prom, with the theme, "There's a City Called Heaven", we had a 
real nice time, and Norman learned the song, "There's a City Called Heaven" 
and would sing it to me all the time. I loved to dance. I knew Norman 
for six years before we were married. In July 1945 we got engaged, and 
on Sentember 20th of that year we were married in the Salt Lake Temple. 

Norman worked for the Winterton' s on the farm, and we lived in Woodland 
until the next spring. Then we moved to Roosevelt to help on the farm 
there. In July 1946 we moved to Ogden and lived with my Mother and 
Grandmother. Norman started at the second street defence depot (D.D.O. ) 
Vernon was born in 1947, and after that Norman went to work at Hill Air 
Force Base. We also had Bryce and Niel while living in Ogden. I took 
care of my Grandmother until she died in early 1947. 

We started to build a house in Roy City, helping with everything we could 
to lower the cost. We moved into our new home in September 1959, taking 
Mother with us, because she couldn't take care of herself since her stroke 
in 1950. In 1962 we had Dale, and in 1965 Mother died. 

In November 1965 Vernon joined the Air Force, trained in Texas, and went 
to Bentwaters, England A.F.B. While there he served a part time mission 
in Inswich. He married in 1969 and has two children,, Paul and LaNette. 



2-2.?" 



Bryce served a mission in 1952 in Delaware Maryland. He is not married yet. 
Niel served a mission in 1974 in Dallas, Texas. He married Judy Goodwin 
and has three children: Katy, Elijah, and kaleb. Dale served a mission in 
1981 in 3aton Rouge, Louisana. He is not married yet and hopes to go back 
and finish his education at the University of Utah. Both of the boys that 
are married were married in the Temple. 

I have served in several positions in the Church, as Primary and Sunday 
School teachers, in the Primary Presidency, and on the Stake Board. The 
most important position to me was being a teacher. 



Standing: Dale, Vernon, Neil, and Bryce 
Seated: DeEtt and Norman .Vinterton 




230 



Dale, Norman, DeEtt Winterton 
tfryce and Vernon 




Neil, Judy and Children 
Katy, Elijah, Kaleb 




-231- 



Hall Reunion 
1967 

Bryce, Norman 
Neil, DeHtt 
Dale 




Barbara and Vernon 
Paul and LaNette 




J2.3Z- 




CHAPTER X 



FLORENCE SPACKMAN HALL 



Husband 



Jesse Miller 



Children 

June 

Dorsey Jo 
Jesse Robert 
Anne 



X33- 



FLORENCE SPACkMAN HALL MILLER 

On March 30, 1895, Florence Spackman Hall was born to John hall and £mna 
Naomi Spackman Hall in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was the ninth child in a 
family of 11 children. They enjoyed a very happy home life and partici- 
pated in many activities that are mentioned in the biographies of her parents, 

On March 30, 1903, when Florence was eight years of are, and living in the 
Cannon Ward, she was baptized into the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints. 



Florence attended Central School on South State Street in Salt Lake City, 
Utah. The school had four rooms upstairs for grades 5 through S and four 
rooms downstairs for grades 1 through 4. They had fire drills to see how 
fast and orderly the children could leave the building. In those days 
the fire engine was drawn by big horses, and the fire bell was rung by a 
fireman pulling a rope. 

In 1916 Florence received her R.N. after three years of training at St. Mark's 
Hospital in Salt Lake City, Utah. She worked as a nurse for 46 years. 





~Z3f- 



During the flu epidemic of 1918, many patients needed special care, 
because there was a shortage of hospital facilities, Florence and seven 
other nurses opened the old Judge Mercy Hospital, which had been condemned 
for demolition. The pre-med and other students from the University of 
Utah were asked to help care for the patients. 

On July 26, 1918, Florence married Jesse Hzra Miller; Bishop bavey of the 
Cannon -Vard performed the ceremony. Their marriage was later solemnized 
in the Hawaiian Temple on May 2, 1940, where they were sealed for Time 
and Eternity. 

Their first two children, June and Dorsey Jo, were born in Salt Lake City, 
Utah. In 1926 the family moved to Brentwood Heights, California, where 
Jesse Robert and Ann were born. 



Jesse, Florence, June 
1920 



Jesse Miller 
.Vorld War I 




■jLZS 




Jesse Ezra Miller was employed 
as a stenographer for the Denver 
and Rio Grande Western Railway. 
Ke worked in the superintendent's 
office. In 1932, after a long 
illness, he passed away. As a 
matter of interest, some of his 
ancestors cane to America on the 
Mayflower-. 

In 1935, Florence and her four 
children moved to Honolulu, 
Hawaii. She worked as a surgical 
nurse in the dispensary at Dole 
i ineapple Company. She also 
worked at Queen's Hospital in 
Honolulu. She met many wonderful 
people while living in Hawaii. 

In 1940, Florence and her children 
returned to California. June came 
later with her husband, kenneth 
Furmidge. During World War II 
Florence worked in the dispensary 
at Consolidated Aircraft Company 
(Convair), a defense plant in San 
Diego. She lived in La Jolla 
with her children. She sometimes 
worked as a relief nurse at 
Scripps Clinic. 



Later, Florence worked at other hospitals in the Los Angeles area. She 
often worked at Glendale Hospital and St. Joseph Medical Center in Burbank, 
California. 

-Vhen Florence was a young girl, her parents advised her and her sisters 
to prepare themselves for the future, so they could always support them- 
selves and their families, if the need should arise. Florence was grateful 
for her parent's advice when she became a widow in 1932. Her nursing 
school training enabled her to support herself and her family during the 
depression and in later years. 

".Vithout God's help, I could never have raised my children alone. I 
remember how I prayed and thanked Him so they would not go to bed hungry, 
even though bread and butter and cole slaw were all they sometimes had," 
she said in a letter. Florence appreciated the many times her brother Ed 
brought her food from his market. 



■2.Zt> 



Florence has been blessed to have the opportunity to watch her four children, 
eight grandchildren and four grent grandchildren grow and develop and 
succeed in their various occupations. 

In spite of difficult tines, she has had nany pleasant experiences and 
happy memories. 



Florence in her garden 
1958 




Florence and great grandchild, Sean 




-23 7- 



Florence 
Christinas 
1962 




Florence and daughter Ann 
1963 




Florence as a girl 




•23 2- 



JUN£ MILLER WDOWIAK 

Husbands: Kenneth Furmidge, D. Ross Lederman, -Edward .Vdowiak 
Children: Kenneth Furmidge, Jr. (Rusty) 

June Miller was born on August 20, 1920, in Salt Lake City, Utah. She was 
the first child of Florence Spackman Hall Miller and Jesse Hzra Miller. 
The family moved to Brentwood heights, California, In 1926. June's father 
died in 1932. The family moved to Honolulu, Hawaii, in 1935. 

June in 1944 




-231- 



June married Kenneth Furmidge, and had one son, Kenneth Furmidge, Jr. 
(Rusty), who was born on April 6, 1943. Rusty and his wife, Doris, have 
two daughters: Keli Lee iVessberg (from Doris's former marriage), who was 
born on October 19, 1965, and Sean Furmidge, who was born on May 13, 1972. 

June divorced Kenneth Furmidge and later married D. Ross Lederman, whom 
she also divorced and who passed away in 1973. 

June married Edward Wdowiak, who had been a friend of the family. He was 
good to everyone and treated June's mother as if she were his own mother. 
It was a terrible shock to the family when he died suddenly of a massive 
heart attack in 1976. 

Rusty, June, Ann, Florence -- 1957 or 1958 




4ft 



Doris, Sean, Rusty 



Keli Lee 





ZVO 



Through the years, June h?s worked as a model , a secretary, escrow 
officer and real estate broker. 

Rusty and his family live in Joshua Tree, only a block away from June. 
This gives her an opportunity to see them frequently and to enjoy her 
grandchildren. 




June in 
1949 or 1950 



1976 
Rusty, Keli, Doris, Sean 



1976 
June, Sean, Keli 




H *VW^< 



" 



--2.V/- 



DORS£Y JO MILLER 

Husbands: Kenneth Russell, Robert Varney 
Children: Linda, Patricia, Mari Jo, Shirley, Robert, 
Michael, and Daniel 

On March 28, 1925, Dorsey Jo Miller was born to Florence Spackraan Hall 
Miller and Jesse Ezra Miller in Salt Lake City, Utah. In 1926, the family 
moved to Brentwood Heights, California. In 1935, after the death of her 
father, they moved to Honolulu, Hawaii. 

Dorsey Jo was a dress designer and worked under Edith Head at Fox Studio. 
Later, she and her husband, Kenneth Russell, owned the Pinafore Shop in 
Honolulu. She did exclusive designing and making of children's clothes. 
She now designs bags, hats, etc. for Palm Springs and Kona shops. 

Dorsey married Kenneth Russell in 1940 and later divorced him. She 
married Robert Varney in 1963 and later divorced him. At the present 
time (1983), she lives in Hawaii under the name of Jo Dorsey. 



Dorsey - 198 2 
Carthaginian Ship 
at Maui 



Dorsey - 1982 




-2.42- 



Dorsey Jo about 1944 



















*>" 



2.43- 



Dorsey has seven children. The oldest child, Linda Russell, was born on 
September 9, 1950. She graduated from California State University, Long 
Beach, with a major in Graphic Arts. Now she has her own office in Texas, 
where she lives with her husband, Tom Lund, whom she married in 1973. 

Patricia (Patsy) Russell was born on February 9, 1952. She received a 
scholarship that enabled her to study nursing at Walter Reed Hospital. 
She has an R.N. , and M.S. degree and Nurse Practitioner in Orange, Cali- 
fornia. She and the physician she works with teach their patients about 
nutrition and Holistic Medicine. She also teaches at Cal State, Long 
Beach, one day a week. 

Mari Jo Russell was born on December 26, 1952. She studied early Child- 
hood Education in college and had only one more year to complete when she 
decided to get married. Mari Jo was married to Merle Glessner on January 
10, 1981. Their daughter, Julie, was born on March 20, 1982. 

Shirley Russell was born on August 20, 1955. She is a Registered Nurse 
and works at Queens Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii. 




Shirley 
Mari Jo 
Patsy 
Linda 



Robert (Bob) Russell was born on January 18, 1957. He owns the Sun Spot 
in kona, where they make flags for ships that come into the harbor at 
kona from all over the world. Bob Russell married katherine S. n/elch 
on September 7, 1982. 

Michael (Mickey) Varney was born on August 8, 1964. He assists the chef 
at a hotel in Kona. 



-^yy- 



Daniel (Danny) Varney was born on November 15, 1965. He is involved in 
sports at Mel. inley Hif;h School in Honolulu. He has earned four ribbons 
for track, lie joined the Air Corps and will go into the service in August 
1983, after he graduates from high school. 




Mari Jo and Merle 
and his brother 

Their wedding day 
January 10, 1981 



Mickey 

at volcano 




Zl¥S- 




January 198 3 

Kathy and Bobby 
Julie and Audrey 



January 1983 

Bob holding Audrey 

Julie in front of 
Shirley 
Dan smiling 




-jLiu- 



Patricia (Patsy) Russell 1963 



Patsy, liicrh School Graduation 
1970 





M a ri Jo Russell 1963 




-o2^7- 



JESSE ROBERT MILLER 

I was born in Brentwood Heights, California, August 18, 1928, the only 
son of Florence Spackman Hall Miller and Jesse E z ra Miller. We moved to 
Hawaii in 1935. nfe enjoyed swimining at the beach at Waikiki, and also 
enjoyed visiting the Bishop Museum to see the feather capes and other 
things from early Hawaii. 

.Ve returned to California in 1940. When we were children, my sister Ann 
and I bought bus passes and traveled around the city on the bus. .Ve 
visited Westlake Park, where we rented a boat. We also vi sited the amuse- 
ment parks at the beaches and the LaBrea Tar Pits. 

3ob - 1946 




■oZVtf- 



I lived in Utah for three years, from 1941 to 1944. 

After graduating from La Jolla High School in 1946, I enlisted in the 
Army Air Force and went to Radar School in Florida. I worked as a radar 
technician for a year and a half in Japan. I was stationed at Yokota 
Air Force Base at Ushiama (about 50 miles from Tokyo). 

After three years in the service, I went to Washington D. C. ai d attended 
Capitol Radio Engineering School for two years. Then I returned to 
California. 

For twenty-six years I worked as an electronic technician at Lockheed 
Aircraft in Burbank, California. 



-3.W- 



ANN MILLER 

My parents, Florence Hall Miller and Jesse Ezra Miller, moved from Utah to 
California in 1926. I was born in Brentwood Heights on January 10, 1931, 
the youngest of four children. My sisters, June and borsey Jo, had both 
been born in Salt Lake City, Utah. My brother, Bob, was also born in the 
community of Brentwood Heights (now part of Los Angeles, and now called 
Brentwood). 

Our hone was only a few miles away from Santa Monica and the Pacific Ocean. 
■Ve enjoyed living close to the beach and the park in Santa Monica. 

My mother was a registered nurse. She received her training from St. 
Mark's Hospital In Salt Lake City, Utah. During the depression there was 
not much demand for private duty nurses. In Hawaii there were more oppor- 
tunities for nurses, so we moved to Hawaii in 1935, when I was four years 
old. My mother worked in the dispensary at Dole iineapple Company and also 
at Queens Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii. 



We enjoyed living in Honolulu, Hawaii for five years. 
California in 1940, when I was nine years of age. 



We returned to 



Ann, June, and Bob 




sVe lived in or near Los Angeles for most of the years when I was growing 
up. '.ve lived in the San Fernando Valley most of this time. We also lived 
in La Jolla, when my mother worked in a defense plant in San Diego during 
^orld War II. She served in the dispensary and provided treatment for the 
employees who were injured while working. 

After I graduated from North Hollywood High School, I attended the Uni- 
versity of California at Los Angeles and Brigham Young University in Provo, 
Utah. I graduated from Brigham Young University with a major in English. 
I also attended the University of California, Berkeley, and graduated from 
the School of Librarianship. 



-«2.i~* 



For ten years I was employed as a reference librarian in a public library. 
Then I returned to school and took courses that would enable me to become 
a teacher. I was employed as a special education teacher and worked with 
handicapped children. I also taught fourth grade. 

f>Sy life has been interesting. I have enjoyed my work and the many places 
that I have visited. I am looking forward to the future and expect to 
have many more challenging experiences. 



Ann — 1970 



Ann — 1977 





Patricia (Patsy) Russell 
Ann Miller 

Mari Jo Russell 




■^LSI- 




CHAPTER XI 



HENRY GEORGE SPACEMAN HALL 



Wives 

Ethel Woolsey 
Helen Kathryn West 



Children 

Donald Woolsey 
Richard Woolsey 
Kenneth Woolsey 
LeRoy Woolsey 



2SZ 



HENRY GEORGE SPACKMAN HALL 

Wives: Ethel Woolsey and Helen Kathryn West Dormer 
Children: Donald, Kenneth, Richard, and LeRoy 

Henry George Spackman Hall was born in Sal t Lake City, Utah, on 7 December 
1898 to John Hall and Naomi Emma Spackman Hall. He was baptized into the 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on 7 December 1906. 

He married Ethel Woolsey on 17 January 1920 in Ogden, Utah, and they were 
sealed in the Salt Lake Temple 6 June 1928. Ethel, daughter of Lucinda 
Luella Roberts and Reuben Andrew Woolsey, was born 4 July 1900 in Kanosh, 
Millard County, Utah. 

They had the following children: Donald Woolsey, born 31 August 1921, in 
Salt Lake City; Kenneth Woolsey, born 22 November 1928 in Los Angeles, 
California; Richard Woolsey, born 17 December 1930 in Long Beach, Cali- 
fornia; and LeRoy Woolsey, born 23 March 1935, also in Long Beach. 

Donald, George, Ethel 

Richard, Kenneth (LeRoy on next page) 



/^ 




XS3- 



LeRoy 




George was mechanically in- 
clined and loved to work on 
old cars. He and a friend re- 
built the car pictured below. 

George and Ethel were later 
divorced, and George married 
Helen Kathryn West Dormer, on 
4 October 1938 in Santa Anna, 
California. She had the fol- 
lowing children: Robert Donner, 
Marjorie Donner Mayes, Shirley 
Donner Floyd, and Barbara Donner 
Wolf. Ethel later married George 
Henry Smith. 

At one time George was a vacuum 
cleaner salesman; he was in the 
grocery business, owning a su- 
per market and liquor store; 
and he had a 140 acre ranch 
east of Barstow, California. 
He rode one of his horses in 
the Rose Parade. George and 
Helen belonged to the Bell 
Ringer Square Dance Club. 

George was also a veteran of 
World War I. He died after a 
car accident in a Pasadena 
Hospital 16 September 1963, 
at the age of 64. 




t 



-2S¥- 



George 



Ethel and George 




■ 




George 




George S. Hall 

BARSTOW, CALIF.— George Spade- 
man Hall, 64, Barstow. died Monday 
in a Pasadena hospital. Born in Salt 
Lake Citv. Married Helon Donner. 
Veteran, World War I . Member, 
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-dav 
Saints, Bell Ringer Sauare Dance 
Club. Survivors: widow, Barstow; 
sons, Don, LeRoy, Richard, all Salt 
Lake Citv; stepson, Robert Donner, 
Seal Beach; stepdaughters, Mrs. 
Marlorie Maves, Downev; Mrs. Shir- 
lev Flovd. Lomita; Mrs. Barbara 
Wolf, Sourhgate; 21 grandchildren; 
I three great-grandchildren. Funeral 
| was Thursday, 2 p.m., Lomita LDS 
I Ward Chapel. Burled, Inglewood 
I Park Cemetery. 



zss-- 



George, Ethel 
Donald 



One of the boys with dog. 




JL.5lt>- 



DONALD WOuLSEY HALL 

rtives: LaRue Nelson, Jean Linton, and Karen Luce 
Children: Donald, Kathleen, Mark, rtendy, and Michael 

Donald Woolsey Hall was born in Salt Lake City, Utah, on August 31, 1921, 
the first of the four sons of Henry George Spackman Hall and Ethel idoolsey 
Hall. 

He attended the Hawthorne School, and when he was about 5 years old his 
family moved to California. Later they moved back to Salt Lake City, and 
his parents were divorced in 1934. When he was a little older he helped 
his Uncle John Hall on his milk route, and was later able to help on an- 
other milk route which paid 5(y a day instead of the 25£ he had been getting. 
Later on Donald did roofing and carpentry work, and finally went into the 
contracting business for himself. 

In 194S he had to have a very serious back operation, as a result of a 
very unfortunate experience in his early life. He lost 6 inches of his 
spine, and they grafted 12 inches of bone from his left leg. He had to lie 
on a hard board in the hospital for 32 days. Five days after the operation 
he literally died for 20 minutes, being able to look down and see his body 
lying there. He had been told by two Orthopedic surgeons that he would 
never walk again, but the Elders of the L.D.S. Church administered to him 
and he revived. He is not only able to walk again, but is able to do heavy 
work. Before his operation he had been paralyzed 3 times, he had been told 
in his Patriarchial blessing that he would live a long and useful life. 
When his Father was in a car accident and not expected to live, Donald 
chartered a plane to take the family to Pasadena, California, to see him. 

Donald was married to LaRue Nelson and had two children, Donald and Kath- 
leen. Later he married Jean Linton and had a son, Mark. Now he is married 
to Karen Luce and has two children, Wendy and Michael. 



Donald & Wendy, 9 davs old 

■■■■ 



Karen & Wendy. 1 month old 




-3-S7- 



Karen wrote the following brief history of their life together so far. 
Don and Karen met through some mutual friends, John and Margaret Peterson. 
At Margaret's suggestion, Don was to call Karen on Thursday night, March 11, 
1976, to set up our first date for Saturday night. Don called at 9:30 p.m., 
and before we knew it, it was 4:30 a.m. Friday night we talked for 4 hours. 
The big night came, but guess who was late? He was l| hours late for our 
blind date. 

After a whirlwind courtship, we were married on June 4, 1976, in the Salt 
Lake Temple. Our marriage day was one big exciting day — late to the 
Temple, late for the wedding breakfast, Karen looking all over for nut 
cups, and finally late for the reception. 

That first summer was full of many funny things happening to us. Then on 
May 16, 1977, .Vendy Luce Kail made her debut 5 weeks early, fie are very 
fortunate to have her, as we almost lost her twice the first 24 hours of 
her life. She is now a very healthy 6 year old, with many things going 
on. She is in the 4-K with her pony, "Scout"; she has had 3 years of tap 
dancing, 2 years of ballet, and is now in clogging. 

On September 6, 1979, Michael Luce Hall made his debut on his Mother's 
40th birthday. Michael has just finished his first year of tap dance 
and Pre-school. He loves going with his Daddy. 

I feel we are a very fortunate family and especially having these two 
healthy children in our later years. 




Karen & Donald 
Michael & .Vendy 



-J2J5t- 



Wendy Hall 








-JL£9- 



Michael Hall 




3.UO' 




Kathleen & 
Donald Hall 



Donald Hall 
with son Don 
& Family 

Hall Reunion 
1967 



4K 



^ 



aL-.** 




~2L\- 



KENNETH WOOLSEY HALL 

(Written by his wife, Helen) 



Wife: Helen John 

Children: Thella, Julieanne, Lorraine, Marilita 

Kenneth Woolsey Hall wps born in Long Bench, California, on November 22, 
1928, to George Spackman Hall and Ethel Woolsey Hall. His Mother died on 
February 24, 1956, in Salt Lake City, and his Father died in a Pasadena 
hospital on September 16, 1963, after a car accident. 

Kenneth, Ethel, Richard, I.eRoy (baby), Donald in back. 







Ken served in the Korean War on the front line for nine months. He had a 
lot of faith pronoting stories about the experiences that he had while he 
was over there. He also spent some time with his Father in Long Beach. 
He has worked at Hill Air Force Base for 18 years. 



2.LZ 



Kenneth Woolsey Hall 




-J.&3- 



He went on a mission to the Southwest Indian Mission, under President 
Golden R. Buchanan, who was my Foster Father for all these years. He had 
a wonderful experience while there. I met him when he first came into the 
field. I remember when the Elders brought three new missionaries to the 
Mission Home. I had been there for three years with my Foster Parents. 
Then I saw him again a year or so later at the Mission home when I was also 
a missionary. He was transferred to the same district as I was, and I was 
released from my mission after three or four months. Then we met again at 
the Missionary Reunion, and several months later we were married. 

Ken worked in building construction for several years and then got a job 
with the Civil Service at the Hill Air Force Base in 1965 and has been 
there ever since. When he retires in a few years we are planning on moving 
to Arizona. We botli like it there, so we hope we can fulfill our dreams. 

My family has been having family reunions there on the farm in Arizona for 
a few years. We met about three times before my Dad passed away, but we 
are all hanpy that it started while he was still with us. He really thought 
that was great to see all of his children at one tine once a year. This 
last July we counted to see how many grandchildren he had, and it was over 
ninety, with fourteen or fifteen great grandchildren. Five of us girls had 
a chance to go to school and four of us were on the Indian Placement Pro- 
gram. I have a sister Gladys living in Chile, who sent two boys on a mis- 
sion, Alvin and Danney .v'atchman. We are really scattered now. 

I, Helen John Hall, was born seven miles west of Tuba City, Arizona, in 
Cocomino County on Anril 9, 1929. The place was the farm the family had 
for many years. It has a spring and about twenty acres or more. My great 
uncle helped my great grandmother buy the place from some Mormon pioneer 
family. Thecost was a silver concho belt. Apparently the pioneers were 
ordered by the government to leave, so they moved on. It's not very far 
from Lee's Ferry, about sixty miles, and I am sure this took place during 
the early part of the 1900' s. 

My Father, Willie John, and Mother, Rose Tucker John, were married about 
1920 there on the farm. They had nine children and adopted four more, born 
to her sister Fay, who was my Father's second wife. Altogether I had six 
brothers and six sisters, so it was a big family. Irene John Hall is one 
of my sisters and is married to LeRoy Hall, Ken's brother. They live in 
West Valley right now. 

My father was a wonderful caring man, who helped anyone who needed help. 
One Christmas he bought a nan a coat, because he knew he needed one. Also, 
he returned an $M.OO check to the government, because he thought someone 
might need it morethan he did. He supported a big family with what was on 
hand. He didn't have any schooling, so jobs were not available to him. 
He worked hard on the farm to have enough food for year around. My Mother 
wove Navajo rugs and sold them to tracers on the reservation, who in turn 
gave her a bag of flour, about 25 lbs., and some sugar and coffee and salt. 
I would say she made a rug about eight by four feet every two weeks. We 
also had dried corn in the winter, so that was what we were reared on. 



-2.toH- 



Helen John Hall 




V * 
4 







2.Li> - 



Rose and Willie John 




2.LL, 



During the war my Father got a defense job in Belnont, Arizona, for about 
a year, and then he was sent to Long Beach, California, and worked on the 
dock there until the war was over. He never held another job, except in 
the beet fields in Richfield, Utah, in 1946-47. It was seasonal work, but 
he didn't seem to mind -- in fact, we were all happy to have him home after 
being gone so long during the war. <Ve had a wonderful relationship with 
our Father. I would say he was very wise and reasonable. He passed away 
in October of 1980, when ninety-nine years old. He still had his natural 
teeth and didn't wear glasses either. He died in his sleep. One day at 
age 97 while he was riding his horse, he felt something warm. Some matches 
in his back pocket had caught fire as he was riding. He was burned on the 
side of his back and part of his leg. When the Doctor took care of him, 
he couldn't believe his age, since his skin on his body was so smooth. 

I was on the Church Indian Placement Program for ten years. It started in 
September of 1947, and I was taught the Gospel by Stake Missionary Fay 
Woolsey in Richfield, Utah, and was baptized by Heber G. Woolsey in June 
of 1948. At the time we didn't realize they were going to be relatives. 
We met each other again at a family reunion in 3ennion, Utah, several years 
ago, and have stayed in touch since then. 

Helen John Hall, first Indian Placement Student (see next page) 




Pboto by John Hart 

Rrst foster parents, Golden ond Thelma Bucha^k* or* fJ^T^^^^ 
Avery Crouch, who suggested program m 1 947, and Helen John Hdfl, «ght, first IndKK, student. 



-<2.67- 



Indian students gather, 
recall birth of placement 



Both the small beginnings and great results of the 
Indian Student Placement Service were evident at the 
second annual Indian Placement reunion held March 
2&36atBYU. 

Elder Ha rtman Rector Jr. ofthe^irst* Quorum of the 
Seventy and executive administrator of the Southwest 
Area addressed the gathering at a dinner March 25. 
Workshops were held the following day. 

The HO placement and former placement students, 
their families, caseworkers, and B YU and Church lead- 
ers at the reunion were but a fraction of these who have 
been involved over the years in the placement of some 
18,500 students. Yet, among them were the handful of 
people who p ioneered the program hi HM7 

They were seated at one end of a dinner table — 
Helen John 'Hall, a Navajo and the first placement stu- 
dent; Amy Avery Crouch, the woman wno'first suggest- 
ed the program; and Golden and Tbelma Buchanan, the 
first foster parents. President Spencer W. Kimbal 1 , who 
initiated -the first placement, was represented by Ed- 
ward L Kimball, his son. Those involved a short time 
later were He be r an d Fay Wolsey and Miles Jensen. 

Helen John H all was 17 and was with her family 
working in sugar beet fields in Richfield, Utah, when 
she was told by her father that she couldn't leave to 
attend school. She'd gone sobbing to Amy Avery (later 
Amy Avery Crouch) who had shown her hospitality ear- 
lier. Helen later asked if she could pitch a tent in the far 
corner of the yard so she could attend school. 

Sister Avery, touched by the. request, approached 
Golden Buchanan, then president of the Richfield stake, 
and asked if he knew of a foster home for Helen Pres. 
Buchanan was also impressed He considered the possi- 
bilities of hu n dr eds of Indian yearns staying with mem- 
bers Pres. Buchanan wrote a proposal to Elder Spen- 
cer W Kimball, then of the- Council of the Twelve and 
recently assigned to the Lamanites 

Elder Kimball read the let ter and immedia t ly took a 
train to Richfield, wnrre he asked the Buchanans to 
become Helens foster family They accepted. 

Prom that qu iet li eg in amgj the Indian Stuaent Place- 
ment Service started It was adopted as a formal 
Church pi ogr am in 19S4 

A Richfield stake missionary, Fay Wolsey, later 
12— TEHUR ft \*B* te m Mn*S &G\UU\UG APRIL 



taught Helen and two of her friends the gospel. Heber, 
Fay's husband, baptized them. Miles Jensen, a bread 
deliveryman, became the first Indian placement case 
.worker. His tenacity became legend in southern Utah. 

Pres. Buchanan, now 80, said although be was over- 
whelmed by the success of the placement program, it is 
but a "small portion of what the Lord has in mind for 
these people." 

Helen John Hall: had clasped hands and exchanged 
smiles and memories with ber foster family and Amy 
Avery Crouch during dinner She later told those at the 
reunion that she had been supported by her foster fam- 
ily in all she had tried to do "Where would we be if 
there were no placement?" she asked 

Elder 'Rector, in his address at the dinner, paid trib- 
ute to those involved in 1 the early program and said, 
" T h e y rece i ved the mspira ti on f rom the Lord; this is the 

Lord's program." 

"When the Lord wants you to do something and you 
do all yon can, you usually only do about 10 percent and 

He. puts in the other 90 percent." 

He told the Lamanites that the Lord "is mindful of 
you and your bloodline It is a commitment that must 
be met It is not going to be easy, but we didn't expect it 
to be. It takes a lot of work to bring about fulfillment of 
prophecy." 

He said all involved in the program must be "filled 
with love for each other. 

Dale T Tingey, speaking at a workshop the following 
day, urged 'Indians to trust, in the 'Lord, learn to take 
counsel from others and have personal courage. He 
cited the example of courage of one young Indian who, 
jast ordained a priest, promised his foster parents he 
would never drink alcohol again. Upon his return to the 
reservation, associates ganged up on him and tried to 
force him to drink They took him down and poured the 
liquid on his face and tried to pry his mouth open 

"I don' t care if you kill me," he toH them. "lam not 
going to drink." Through Ihs example, related Tingey, 
one of his assailants was so i mpr e sse d that he became 
an active member Both young men later filled 



Also speaking a t the renmon were Mary Platero and 
BabeBilke 

17,1WBB 



-J-k%- 



Ken and I have been married twenty-six years now. ,Ve were married in the 
Salt Lake Temple on August 8, 1957, and we have four wonderful girls. 
Right now I am in the Fifth iVard Relief Society, and Ken is First Counselor 
in the Bishopric, vie have been serving in the Fifth <v'ard for almost three 
years now. tv'e were called to help over there, as it is the only Indian tVard 
in the Valley. It covers the whole Salt Lake Valley, and it has been a 
wonderful experience for the family. 

Thella, our oldest daughter, is a senior at B.Y.U. this year, majoring in 
Graphic Illustration and Designing. She went to Elementary Hawthorne 
School here in Sd t Lake City, also Lincoln Junior High and South high School. 
She was in the National Teen Age Cotillion Club when she was in High School 
and was named Miss Congeniality. She worked as a volunteer at Primary Hos- 
pital for awhile, and was at B.Y.U. for two years before she went on a mis- 
sion to theMissouri St. Louis Mission, under President Norman '.V. Olsen. 
After she came home she worked for ZCMI for awhile and is now back at R.Y.U. 
finishing her school. She is a very good seamstress and also a very good 
cook and loves doing it. She is my right hand cook when she is home. Je 
love her and her cooking. She was born in Sa]t Lake City on May 14, 1958. 

Julieanne Hall, our second daughter, is the only one that was born in 
Arizona. She was born at Tuba City on July 30, 1960. She just returned 
from her mission April 8, 1983, the Oklahoma Tulsa Mission, under Presi- 
dent Pat B. Brian, and is back in school at the B.Y.U. She also attended 
Hawthorne, Lincoln, and South High. She was a member of the Pep Club there, 
and after that she got to play baseball and work at the Multi-purpose Com- 
pound one summer. She was also a member of the group called the Lamanite 
Generation at B.Y.U. and was able to tour and perform with them in the 
Southern States and Canada. Right now she is a junior and majoring in 

(continued following picture) 



Picture on next page: Helen, Ken, Thella and Partner 

National Teen Age Cotillion Club 
State Capitol Building 
1976 



3.1,7- 



I 41 A A 


1 1 








«■**■ jrf*j 


■ » • - 


c^.^^bL 




^ 
^ 


V] 


a"b P^^ 







Julieanne 



Nursing. She also went on the 
Survival Trip with a group 
from the B.Y.U. lier hobby, 
I would say, is sports — it 
seems that she is always on 
a team somewhere for church 
or school, and really likes 
it. She was also in the high 
school choir and was able to 
travel to Hawaii for the com- 
petitions, where they placed 
second in the nation. One 
year South High won the silver 
award in Washington D.C. She 
is an adventurous person and 
will dare to do things I 
wouldn't dare try. 



Lorraine is our third daughter. 
She was born here in Salt Lake 
City in the L.D.S. Hospital 
on July 26, 1961. She was a 
big baby, pretty, and always 
contented wherever she was. 
She attended the same schools 
the other girls did, and was 
also a member of the Pep Club. 
She is also going to B.Y.li. 
and a member of the Lamanite 
Generation. She toured in 
Canada with the group, and 
last year went to Mainland 
China with them. She had a 
wonderful experience over there. They visited Hawaii, Taiwan, Phillipine 
Islands and China and were gone for six weeks. That in itself was a wonder- 
faul education for them. Brother Keal Maxwell and his wife went with them, 
also. Lorraine is a senior and is also najoring in Nursing. She is engaged 
to a wonderful boy from Hawaii, and they are planning to be married on 
December 2, 1983, in the Salt Lake Temple. They will be going back to Hawaii, 
and the Hall family also plans to go there for the reception, hopefully. 
She is living home for the summer and will start classes in September at 
the University of Utah. She also was second attendant to Miss Indian B t Y.U. 
in 1981. She has fulfilled all her duties well. We are happy that she has 
enough interest in her academic outlook to "hang in there" all these years. 




Marilita, our youngest is at B.Y.U. also. This is her third year, aid she 
is majoring in Economics. However, she is going to leave that on hold, 
since she has decided to go on a Mission. She is getting her papers ready 
and will probably leave some time in August. There she hopes to fulfill 
her heart's desire. She was born July 31, 1962, and also attended Hawthorne, 
Glendale Junior High and graduated from South Hiph School. She and her 
sister Julie also went on the Survival Tri'.i from B.Y.U. in 1981. They had 
a wonderful experience. She was also in the Pep Club at South High and took 



-3.7/- 



first runner-up to Miss Indian B.Y.U. in March of 1983. She was a Seminary 
officer in high school and also a member of the school choir that traveled 
to Florida to the High School Competition for U.S.A. They didn't win that 
year, but said it was fun. 

.Ve are all doing fine and are happy to see our family grow. Ken and the 
girls had a chance to help with sand bagging during the flood. .Ve also 
have an Anglo girl living with us. She is a very wonderful person and a 
joy to have around. .Ve have all learned to love her. .Ve joke about it — 
we tell people she is on placement program - reversed. .Ve think she is a 
very special person. She sings, dances, exercises, and works two jobs so 
she can get back to B.Y.U. in September. 



Lorraine 



Lorraine, second attendant 
to Miss Indian B.Y.U. 1981 




272.- 



Ken and Helen Hall with Marilita. first runner-up to Miss Indian ii.Y.U.1983 




-2.73- 



RICHARD WOOLSBY HALL 

Richard Woolsey Hall was born on December 17, 1930, in Long Beach, Cali- 
fornia, the third son of George Spackman Hall and Bthel Woolsey Hall. He 
was a good-natured, hard-working boy, who liked to pull jokes on his 
brothers and his friends. 

He towed cars and also worked in a cafe in Big Cottonwood Canyon. He 

and his brother Kenneth were in the Korean War, working on heavy artillery. 

Richard died in a Salt Lake Hospital of burns received in an explosion, 
as he was cleaning a tank at Dugway Proving Grounds, Toole, Utah. It was 
on September 7, 1958, when he was only 27 years old. 




Blast Victim's 
Funeral Set 

Funeral services for Richard 
Woolsey Hall, 27, 603 Brown- 
ing Ave., will be conducted 
Thursday. 

Services will 
be held at noon 
at 2350 E. 13th 
South. 

Friends may 
call at the place 
of services 
Wednesday from 
7 to 9 p.m. and 
Thursday prior 
to services. Bur- _ 
ial will be in Mr. Hall 
Salt Lake City Cemetery. 

Mr. Hall died in a Salt Lake 
hospital Sunday night of burns 
received in a gasoline explo- 
sion at Dugway Proving 
Grounds, Tooele. The accident 
occurred Aug. 19, when a high- 
octane gasoline tank exploded 
as he was cleaning it.. 

He was born Dec. 17, 1930, 
at Long Beach, Galif., a son of 
George and Ethel Woolsey 
Hall. 

Survivors include his father, 
Barstow, Calif.; three brothers, 
Donald W. Hall, Kenneth W. . 
Hall, Salt Lake City; LeRoy( 
W. Hall, with U.S. Army, Ft." 
Carson, Colo.; a maternal 
grandmother, Mrs. Luella Rob- 
erts Woolsey, Salt Lake City. 



all- 




RaHio.TV Log 
Page H-16 



y, Utah — Sunday Morning — June 9, 1957 




Mission of Mercy 
to BUtzrs 

■ Spieia; tn. rnf tribune 

BRIG£fe*5N— A missie* of 
meref^toraed i n t a flaring 
flametrp Saturday about 4 
p.m. in Big Cottonwood Can- 
yon. 

It all started when Richard 
Hall, about 27, Brighton, 
drove a pickup truck up the 
road to give a stalled motorist 
a push. 

Suddenly the pickup, owned 
by E. V. Glines, Silver Fork 
Lodge operator, burst into 
flames. Spilled .^.soline on 
the truck ignited — no one 
knows just how— and within 
seconds the truck was envel- 
oped in flames. 

The truck was destroyed. 

What about the vehicle that 
was stalled? 

In the excitement, no one 
seems to know. 



What started out as » mission qi mercy to 
help a stalled motorist, turned into flam- 



ing trouhlo. Richard Hail tries to put out 
ffre. (Photo, Borg* Aftfersoa. TrRrane Staff.) 



-2 75"- 



LEROY WOOLSEY HALL 

Wife: Irene Cqrnelita John 

Children: Roberta, Ronaine Leta, Roy Woolsey, Ronald John, 
Robert John, Roger .Voolsey, Rodney .Voolsey. 

LeRoy Woolsey Hall was born 23 March 1935 in the Signal Hill Hospital in 
Long Beach, California, to Henry George Spackman Hall and Ethel Moolsey 
Hall. 

When I was just 5 months old my parents separated, and Mother brought us 
children back to Salt Lake City, where we lived with my Grandmother '.Vool- 
sey. Mother had to go to work, so 1 didn't see much of her, and I didn't 
have a chance to know my Father. Mother worked at the Deseret Mills, 
making garments for the Church. Three of the boys slept on the couch in 
the front room of my Grandmother's house. 

I was baptized into the L.D. S. Church 29 January 1944, and attended the 
Hawthorne School, walking about 1 mile each way. .Vhen I was about 9 years 
old we moved to the home on 6th East and Browning Avenue. I also attended 
Lincoln Junior High and South High School. I was in several Spanish plays 
at school, and worked on the stage crew for the operas that were staged 

there. 

LeRoy 

and family 

1973 







3.70- 



LeRoy Woolsey Hall - 1956 




\ S** 



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"*^^^^^^£* 



I 



Ik 



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-OJ71- 



When I was very young, Mother washed clothes in a ringer type washer, with 
a knob on top of the ringer to make the ringer tight or loose. On the side 
of the roller was an arm with which you pulled the top roller down and 
locked the two rollers in place. You could hit it and it would open up, 
but it was hard to open if the top knob was tightened too tight. You had 
to hand feed the clothes into the roller. One day I got ny left hand 
caught in the roller, and it rolled my hai d and arm all the way up to my 
shoulder. My Mother had a hard tine to get my arm out, and when she did 
she took ne to the hospital. I was blessed that ny arm was not seriously 
injured. 

One summer day when I was riding ny bike I had to cross Main Street on 17th 
South, and I was on the southwest corner standing over ny bike waiting for 
the light to change, when a semi-truck turned around the corner where I 
wps standing. .Then the truck got half way around the corner, I lost ny 
balance and started to fall over. I had fallen half way over by the time 
the truck went by. Looking back on what happened I would have to give 
credit to ny guardian angel for holding me up until the truck went by me 
around the corner. After the back wheel went by, I fell to the ground. 
I did not think any more about it until about 25 years later, when one day 
a friend was talking about it. She said she was standing on the opposite 
corner the day this happened to me. She said it was a miracle I was not 
run over by the truck. She could not understand why I did not fall until 
the truck went by. To her she said this was a testimony that God lives 
and was protecting me. 

I was called to serve in the Southwest Indian Mission (I was my brother 
Kenneth's replacement there) from 1956 to 195S. I remember 2 very spiri- 
tual experiences while on ny mission. One day I went off by myself to 
pray about the truthfulness of the Book of Mormon. After praying for a 
long tine, I felt the presence of a Heavenly messenger, who touched ny 
head. It frightened me, but there were no words spoken -- I could just 
feel his presence. I knew ny prayers were answered. 

Another tine I had climbed a high M.esa to pray. I have always had a fear 
of high places, so when I went to climb down it seemed so steep I felt I 
couldn't make it. I prayed for help to get down, and suddenly I felt an 
arm on each side of ne as I climbed down, and as soon as I rot to the 
bottom, they let go. Again my prayers were answered. 

•Vhen I returned from ny mission I worked with ny brother Don in his con- 
tracting business. Then I was drafted into the Army and spent 2 years 
training at Fort 3enning, Georgia. 

One day I met Irene Carmelita John at my brother ken's house. She was 
Ken's wife's sister. .Ve didn't like each other at first, but later started 
going together. We corresponded while I was in the service and were soon 
married, on 29 December 1958, at Ken's home while I was on furlough from 
the Army at Christmas time. Our marriage was later solemnized in the Salt 
Lake Temple on 22 June 1962. 



JL7Z- 



IRENE AiND LEROY 






Irene was born 15 January 1934 in aVillow Springs, Arizona, daughter of 
.Villie John and Rose Tucker John. She remembers herding sheep with her 
family during a severe winter in about 1956, on the reservation near the 
Colorado River in Arizona. iVhile the family was all asleep in the tent, 
Irene woke up and saw a woman standing by her feet. She told Irene that 
they should get out of the area as soon as possible, because a big storm 
was coming. Early the next morning they packed up and moved out with the 
sheep. That day it snowed 2 feet where they had been camped. It was a 
good thing they left when they did, because the sheep will not move when 
they are wet. They were so thankful for the warning they had received 
from a Heavenly messenger. 

Irene has such great faith. Another time when we were taking a short-cut 

from Bryce Canyon to Lake Powell, we came to a road that had been washed 

out and no one was able to get through to the other side. I was about to 

turn back, when Irene said, "here's your faith?" That gave me the courage 
to try, and we finally made it. 

.Ye decided to move to Georgia after our first child was born, and on our 
way to Denver our fuel pump started leaking. In trying to fix it my thumb 
got caught, and the fan belt pulled my thumb around the generator, which 
tore my thumb off so it was just hanging. We had to drive 45 miles to a 
Doctor, who said he couldn't help me. I had no pain during that drive, 
but the Doctor gave ma a pain shot and sent me by ambulance to an Army 
hospital 60 miles away, where they fixed my thumb. Today it is all right. 
Irene and the two children (one adopted daughter of Irene's) returned to 
Salt Lake City, and I went on to Georgia to finish my Army service. 



<Z7?' 



While in Fort Benning I taught a Sunday School class, and since it required 
a lot of study, the fellows called me the "Preacher". Since I was the only 
Mormon in my group, I was ridiculed, but still many of them came to me for 
advice. 

Back in Salt Lake City, in 1960, I taught a Book of Mormon class to the 
investigators, and 3 out of 5 were baptized. Later I was called by the 
Branch President, through the First Presidency, to be the Branch Clerk of 
the Moroni Branch (Indian), first in Connerton, and then in West Jordan, 
for S years. Then I was called to be the first Counselor for 2 years. I 
also worked with the Indians in the Title 4 program in the Granite School 
district, which helped the parents help the students to get a better educa- 
tion with tutoring, etc. My grandfather, Reuben Woolsey, had been an in- 
terpreter for the Indians. They trusted him and thought so much of him 
they named a knoll for him — the Woolsey Knoll. 

While serving in the Moroni Branch we had to travel 20 miles each way for 
all of the meetings. One Thursday evening as we were returning from the 
branch meeting, with the children in the old army truck, we ran out of 
gas at the top of the Kearns hill and had to coast all the way home. We 
were fortunate to hit both green lights and made it home safely. Later 
on we tried it again to see if it could easily be done, but couldn't. 
Again we knew we had been protected. 

While working with the Indian branch, we had permission to use the B.Y.U. 
program entitled, "From Eagles Bed", and, using our own people, including 
some of our own family, we made a tape and film strip, which was well 
received during the 4 years we presented it. Another film strip our family 
participated in was similar to "Man's Search for Happiness", but it answered 
the questions and was used by the missionaries to bring many families into 
the Church. Through the years I have helped stage many programs for the 
Church in which my children have participated. President Horace Knowlton 
said he felt inspired to call me to work in the Moroni Branch to work with 
the Indians. I am now a Seventy and teach 2 classes: the Priesthood 
.Hjorum and "Every Member a Missionary". 

We have the following children: Roberta, who was Irene's daughter by a 
former marriage and adopted by us. She was born 4 April 1955 in Reno, 
Nevada, and is married to Mark l.orthen. They have a daughter, Carmelita 
Rose Anne Wort hen. 

Romaine Leta was born 20 September 1959 in Salt Lake City, and was married 
to Randy Brent Christensen on 15 June 1979. They have one child, Jaron 
Brent Christensen. Romaine was called to demonstrate with the Indian sign 
language ''Go, My Son", and the "Lord's Prayer" at a Stake Leadership 
meeting. She was also asked to do it at the Toole girls' camp. 

Next we had 5 boys: Roy Woolsey, born 3 November 1961 in Salt Lake City; 
Ronald John, born 2£ March 1963 in Murray, Utah; Robert John, born 2S March 
1963 in Murray, Utah; Roger Woolsey, born 6 October 1964 in Salt Lake City; 
and Rodney Woolsey, born 15 April 1974 in Granger, Utah. 



-JLZ0 



One day our youngest son, Rodney, while looking at Romaine's new baby, 
said, "Jaron is « Indian, I'm \ Indian, and Roberta is full Indian. Does 
that mean I'll be a full Indian when I grow up?" 

Another bit of humor. One day Roger hit his brother Robert. After talking 
with him and explaining why he shouldn't do that, Irene said, "Remember, 
Heavenly Father is watching you." Later they heard another scream. Roger 
had hit Robert again. When asked why, he said, "1 looked out the window, 
and Heavenly Father wasn't watching, so I hit him." 

Our family have enjoyed a lot of camping trips together. They all like to 
sleep out, either under the open sky or in a tent. The boys like to catch 
frogs and tease their sisters. We always have a good time together. 

Many years I have taken my oldest son, Roy, deer hunting, along with a 
friend and his family. We would take the old Army truck and pull down 
some of the dead pine trees for a bonfire, crossing about 5 at a time. 
The fire w^uld last all night long. We always got a deer, but we would 
never hunt on Sunday, ifwe were out over a week-end. Instead, we would 
hold church services and go for a ride, but we would never do any hunting 
on that day. 

On our family camping trips we would enjoy playing games around the 
camp fire -- football or "Tin Can Shinney". The family all enjoy each 
other and have had many good times together. 



In Arizona 
With prandf ather' s horse. 




JLSI- 



On Camping Trip 



• 




•9. 




Visiting on the 

Reservation in 
Arizona 



--Z&2.' 



Roberta 



Komaine 





Roy 



Romaine & husband, 

Randy Brent Christensen 

Jaron Brent 




1 V 




--2.tf.3- 



Robert (twin) 



Ronald (twin) 





Roger 



Rodney 





-jlM- 



Three Brothers, Donald, Kenneth, LeRoy 
and Families 





Uhllr«. So^r x 



-3JZ5-- 



LeRoy, Irene and Family 

Hall Reunion 1967 



>V» 








LeRoy, Irene and Fanily 
1973 





-PS 



v 



i I 



/PV 



■* 



~ 3-.<lL 




CHAPTER XII 



MABLE SPACkiVAN HALL 



Husband 



Charles Edwin Olsen 



Children 

Patricia 
Barbara 



~£.$7- 



MABEL SPACKMAN HALL OLSEN 

(Written by Arlene Crittenden Porter) 

Mabel Spackman Hall was born July 18, 1900, in the old homestead we all 
loved so much (in the bend of the Jordan River) in the Cannon .Vard in Salt 
Lake City. She was the youngest child of John and Naomi Emma Spackman Hall, 
She was baptized into the L.D. S. Church on her 8th birthday, July 18, 1908. 

She was an idol of mine, being only 11 years older than I. She went away 
to school, so we didn't see her too often. I remember her small but very 
beautiful wedding at the hone in Highlaid Park, 1249 Whitlock Avenue, on 
the 24th of June, 1926. She married Charles Edwin Olsen, who was a school 
teacher from New York and who was later an athletic coach at Columbia Uni- 
versity. Mabel also taught school when she went back there after their 
marriage. 

Mabel as a young teacher and bride. 




-2.28- 



They had two daughters, Barbara Jane, born June 29, 1927, and Patricia 
Jean, born on December 19, 1929. Barbara married Charles Hodgkins on 
June 23, 1950, and had 3 boys and 1 girl. Patricia married William kaest- 
ner on March 16, 1957, and they had 3 girls and 1 boy. Since Barbara's 
husband specialized in international law, they have lived abroad a good 
deal of the time — in Australia, Italy, the Phillipines, and England, 
where he was an attorney for Coca-Cola Export Company. At one time Barbara 
was the fashion editor for McCalls Magazine. Once during the late 1950' s 
Mabel modeled a dress for middle aged women, and her picture appeared in 
that magazine. 

Mabel only came .Vest twice after she married. Once she brought her two 
little girls and visited us briefly in Union, and the other time she came 
alone in July, 1951, and visited us and her brother Ed in Pasadena. She 
was so intrigued with the Jacaranda trees all covered with purple blossoms. 
I know she loved her garden, because she sent seeds to some of her nieces 
with whom shecorresponded. I never saw her after that, but I phoned her 
occasionally. She was always very interested in hearing about her family 
in the West. 

They spent the winters in Florida and their summers in Maine by a lake. I 

always wanted to visit them, but never did. However, my sister Bessie Mae 

and her husband, Ed, went to see them in Florida, but they were not home 

at the time. However, they did get to see their cute little white and yellow 

cottage. 

Ted had diabetes and had to have a leg amputated, which caused him to spend 
his last years in a nursing home. He died October 14, 1978, at theage of 81. 
Mabel died a year later on December 12, 1979, in the same nursing home in 
Somers, New York, having suffered many years with arthritis. 



Mabel and Ted 



1968 




-229- 



Mabel and brother -Ed 
1951 



Mabel and Arlene 
1951 




■ 








-J.90- 



Tatricia (Kaestner) Olson is a graduate of Colby Junior College in New 
York and has been doing secretarial work at the high school. She recently 
moved to Portland, Maine, to be near their family summer home. She loves 
fishing and all outdoor activities. She has the following children: 

Jeanne, who is working in a bank in Patterson, New York. 
Carl, a business major at Syracuse University in Syracuse, 

New York. He will graduate in December, 1983. 
Anne, who graduated from State University in New York and is 

teaching at Onondaga Community College and for the 

N. Y.S. Department of Environmental Conservation. 

(N.Y.S. — New York State). She teaches Outdoor 

Recreation and is considering coming out .Vest to 

continue her education. 
Dianne is going to Cornell University in New York, and is 

studying Industrial Labor Relations. 
The family all love to ski and participate in outdoor activities. 

Barbara Olson Hodgkins is a successful sculptress and has been living in 
London, England, since 1976. She has had a showing of her work in London 
and plans to have one in the United States soon. Her Children: 

Charles 

Jane 

Robin, her son who will be married in August (1933). 

Barbara will be coming to the United State for the 

wedding. 

Thomas 

The above information was obtained when Anne kaestner visited Salt Lake 
City on June 5, 1983. .Ve spent a lovely afternoon together getting ac- 
quainted, visiting Temple Square, having lunch at hotel Utah, and seeing 
the river on State Street (the result of floods from the heavy winter snows 
melting too fast). Anne is a lovely girl, and we are hoping she will come 
to Salt Lake City to continue her education at the University of Utah. 



3.9/- 



CHATTER XIII 



GENEALOGY AND MAPS 



-Z9Z- 



TO THE DESCENDANTS OF JOHN HALL AND NAOMI EMMA SPACKMAN HALL: 

LeRoy Woolsey Hall has prepared these genealogical records from information 
on family group sheets in his possesion and submitted by Arlene Crittenden 
Porter. He hopes you will overlook any mistakes he may have made. 

In order to have the proper sequence on the Pedigree Chart, he used his 
own family records as an example to be followed, as you substitute your 
own family name at the beginning of the chart. 

He would appreciate receiving family group sheets of your parents, as well 
as your own family, in order to compile a complete genealogical record of 
our Hal 1 family. 

There are other records available through him, as well as at the Salt Lake 
Genealogical Library of the L.D.S. Church, so you are invited to contact 
him at the following address, if you are interested: 

LeRoy .V. Hall 

4058 tv'estlake Avenue 

Granger, Utah, 84120 (West Valley, Utah) 

Phone 968-1277 



■oZ.?3- 



THE PERCENTAGES SHOWN REFER TO COPIES OF PARISH REGISTERS (CHRISTENINGS. MARRIAGES AND BURIALS) 
THAT ARE AVAILABLE AT THE GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY. 



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ENGLISH CHANNEL 



MAP OF ENGLAND AND WALES 

-2.94- 



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■3^^- 



GiAPTER XIV 



MISCELLANEOUS PICTURES 



30? ~ 




Grandma Hall 
and 

Josephine 



Some of the 

Grandchildren 




-3/0- 



George on Furlough 




Florence, George, f'.abel 



Florence 









-31/- 



Mabel (ripht) and friend 





Florence 





-3)2. 



Florence & George 
Emma's twins 



Florence 





Emerson, Joseph and Dad, Alma 




■3/3- 




Old Hall home, 21st 
South and 9th .Vest by 
the Jordan River. 
Picture taken by Ann 
Miller after Hall re- 
union, 1967. Arvid 
Skog pictured in front, 
Home had been vacant 
and partly burned and 
torn down. There is 
now a commercial build- 
ing there. 



Ella and Louise at Hall Reunion 
Roy, Utah, 1967 




■3/Y- 



Hall Reunion at Roy, Utah, 1967 





-3 IS- 



Kail Reunion at Roy, Utah, 1967 





-3IL- 




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